Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Archive for the ‘Canada’ Category

Canada is #1 in the world because…

What comes to mind when you think of Canada? The imposing rugged wilderness of the Rockies? Maple syrup and Tim Hortons? Ice hockey? Hat-clad, horse riding Mounties? Famously friendly inhabitants?

Wherever your mind takes you about Canada, it seems that the rest of the world agrees with all the good stuff. Take a look.

The world’s most admired country

The Reputation Institute’s 2015 Country Reptrak® Survey has revealed that Canada is the world’s most reputable country – beating 54 other nations to the top spot. In particular, Canada scored highly for its effective government, absence of corruption, friendly and welcoming people, and welfare support system.

The Institute surveyed approximately 48,000 residents of G8 countries to gather the data for their rankings. Survey respondents ranked the reputations of the world’s 55 wealthiest nations on a variety of environmental, political and economic factors.

This highlights how Canada still remains a popular choice for people looking to move countries.

Check out the full report here.

Clifton Hill, Ontario - by Gary Burke, courtesy of Flickr.com

Clifton Hill, Ontario – by Gary Burke, courtesy of Flickr.com

The world’s safest country

Your well-being is influenced by your feelings of personal security and how unlikely it is you’ll be physically assaulted or become a victim of crime. In Canada, the chances of you being assaulted are incredibly low.

The OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) Better Life Index focuses on the well-being of inhabitants across countries, rather than looking at economic statistics and cold data. Their most recent findings showed that 1.3% of people in Canada reported being an assault victim in the past 12 months. This is the lowest rate in the OECD, where the average is 3.9%.

So expect a safer, happier you if you make the move to Canada – see how else Canada scores in the Better Life Index.  For a sneak peek, it ranks above average in housing, well-being, health status, income and wealth, social connections, environmental quality, jobs and earnings, education and skills, and civic engagement.

Call Canada home

If you’re keen to make the move to one of the world’s best countries, don’t miss our Working International Job Expo next March in the UK.  As always, we’ll have a section devoted exclusively to Canada, with Canadian employers and exhibitors there to help you find a job, and learn more about visas.  In the meantime though, you can still search for a job online and find out more about Canadian visas.

You tell us

What do you think Canada is #1 in the world for? Find us on Facebook and share your thoughts with us.

Spirit Island, Canadian Rockies - by Ann Badjura of Ann Badjura Photography, courtesy of Flickr.com

Spirit Island, Canadian Rockies – by Ann Badjura of Ann Badjura Photography, courtesy of Flickr.com

Immigration news round-up – October 2015

This month, Australia has recently launched a work and holiday arrangement with the People’s Republic of China and a new online visa label system. In Canada, there’s a mixed bag of news – from holds on some visa schemes to increased thresholds for other schemes. With all these changes, you could benefit from some Canadian visa advice – see who can help.

Plus in New Zealand there’s great news for overseas agricultural workers seeking seasonal work, plus some handy information about what you can and can’t bring into the country.

Flag - Australian

Australia

Work and Holiday arrangement with the People’s Republic of China now live

As of 21 September 2015, up to 5,000 educated young Chinese nationals per year will be able to take advantage of the Work and Holiday visa arrangement between Australia and the People’s Republic of China.

The visa allows young Chinese nationals to have an extended holiday of up to 12 months in Australia, where they can undertake short-term work or study.

If you’re a Chinese national visit the Australian Embassy Beijing website to see if you’re eligible. Or find out more about Australia’s working holiday visa scheme.

Electronic visa record replaces passport labels

Traditionally when you received your Australian visa, a label was fixed into your passport. However, from 1 September 2015, you’re no longer able to request and pay for a visa label.

Instead, you access your visa record through the free Visa Entitlement Verification Online (VEVO) service. When you scan your passport at the airport, it’s linked automatically to this service and will let passport officials know your visa status.

This change reflects the Australian Government’s agenda to make their services more accessible and convenient to their clients through the provision of secure online services. VEVO is also efficient, reliable and provides real-time information about your visa.

This demonstrates Australia’s commitment to a overhauled, more streamlined and efficient visa system. More information is available at the Department of Immigration and Border Protection.

Flag - Canada

Canada

Fast track your move to Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia, on Canada’s east coast, has just announced they will be able to fast track another 300 migrant workers who qualify under the express entry visa scheme that’s aimed at skilled workers.

It also means that Nova Scotia can nominate a total of 1,350 immigrants in 2015 under their provincial nominee program – almost double the previously allowed 700.

Nova Scotia remains a popular choice for skilled workers. In 2014, 2,670 newcomers settled in Nova Scotia – more people than have ever arrived in the past 10 years. Nova Scotia clearly offers a lot to would-be Canadians too – Statistics Canada show a retention rate of 71 per cent for immigrants that landed in Nova Scotia between 2007 and 2011.

If you’d like to take advantage of this fast track entry to Nova Scotia, take a look at some job opportunities – having a Canadian job offer may help your visa application. Or find out more about Nova Scotia’s nominee program.

Alberta and British Columbia release updates to their Provincial Nominee Programs

Canadian provinces manage their own visa schemes, called Provincial Nominee Programs (PNP). They all have their own rules, requirements and application thresholds. Alberta and British Columbia have both released updates to their programs:

Alberta

Due to a 10,000-application backlog, no new applications will be accepted to the Alberta Immigration Nominee Program until January 2016. However, if you’re interested in moving to Alberta, you can still apply through Canada’s express entry visa scheme.

British Columbia

Applications to the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BCPNP) Skills Immigration stream and Express Entry stream have been put on hold until early 2016, due to application thresholds being met.

However, the Health Care Professional, Northeast Pilot Project and Entrepreneur Immigration streams will continue to accept applications.

Find out more about the BCPNP.

Skill shortages felt across Canada

A new survey by CareerBuilder.ca shows the impact of skill shortages on Canadian businesses:

  • 29% of survey respondents (almost three in 10 employers) have jobs that have been unfilled for 12 weeks or longer.
  • Three quarters of those respondents say this has negatively impacted upon their companies.
  • 31% of respondents said that un-fillable job openings lead to work not getting done – with 22% saying their companies are losing revenue.

With Canadian businesses feeling the pinch of a lack of skilled workers, this may be good news for skilled workers wanting to move to Canada – watch this space.

Flag - NZ

New Zealand

Overseas agricultural contractors able to work easier in NZ

By 1 June 2016, seasonal workers from overseas could find it easier to temporarily work and live in New Zealand. A new visa deal means that rural contractors can more simply bring in overseas workers to help them over the busy summer harvest season.

Rural Contractors New Zealand (RCNZ) president Steve Levet estimates that the industry requires around 900 seasonal staff from overseas each year. In New Zealand there is a shortage of suitably skilled operators able to handle highly sophisticated machinery – so they look overseas for the skills they need.

These overseas workers – traditionally from Ireland and England – have good mechanical skills and are already up and running, meaning they don’t require extensive training.

About the new scheme

With a less rigorous process than what currently has to be followed, under the new scheme RCNZ would apply for Approval in Principle on behalf of all its members.

Then their members can apply online for a visa for the person they’re recruiting without having to meet any of the current requirements, which include having to advertise and going through Work and Income New Zealand first.

No further details are available at this stage – we’ll keep you updated. If you’re not already on our New Zealand mailing list, sign up [Link to: NZ newsletter sign up] and you’ll be the first to know.

Arriving in New Zealand – What you need to know

Whether you’re just visiting or are coming to New Zealand permanently, there are things you need to know.

For starters, do you need a visa? If you’re going on holiday, you might not – see if you need a visitor’s visa.  If you’d like to work and live in New Zealand, you will – read more about NZ visas.

What you can’t bring in to NZ

Pretty standard stuff, but this list includes:

  • Hazardous materials.
  • Endangered species (without a permit).
  • Weapons (without a permit).
  • Objectionable publications, including videos and digital images, or
  • Controlled drugs.

What you have to declare

New Zealand has very strict biosecurity rules – not surprisingly as any rogue flora or fauna can wreck havoc on its unique ecosystem. This means you have to declare the following items when you arrive:

  • Food of any kind – this even includes any food, especially fruit, you might have picked up on the plane or coming through duty free.
  • Plants or parts of plants (alive or dead).
  • Animals (alive or dead) or their products.
  • Equipment used with animals.
  • Camping gear, golf clubs and used bicycles – even muddy walking boots.
  • Biological specimens.

Anything you declare will be examined to check it’s ok to bring into NZ. This may include it being cleaned or treated before being allowed in.

The fines for not declaring any of the above are very high – and not worth the risk.

For more information about what you can (and can’t) bring in New Zealand, visit the New Zealand Government website.

Migration to New Zealand reaching its peak

New Zealand has always been a popular choice for skilled international workers but now, finally, the figures seem to be nearing their peak. A recent report by Westpac, a NZ bank, shows that migration to NZ is slowing.

One reason that could be behind this is the approval process for a resident visa, which favours applicants who have a job offer in New Zealand. Another is that NZ’s residence approval targets remain at 45,000 – 50,000 a year, which simply has not kept up with the demand.

Finally, Westpac estimated that Auckland (prime location of choice for most migrant workers) is not keeping up with the housing demand, which is under pressure from both migrant arrival and natural occupant increase.

So, if you’re thinking of coming to New Zealand, make sure you consider other parts of the country before you make the move.  It’s not impossible to get your metaphorical foot in the door in Auckland, but making sure you’ve ticked key boxes (like getting a job prior) will help you get ahead.

The Best 3 Ways to Move to Canada

You’ve imagined tellng your current boss that you’re leaving for Canada. You’ve researched where you want to live. You’ve started the job search. But you’re still not sure how to actually make the move from the computer screen to Canada.

Sound familiar?

We’ve compiled our top three ways to make your move to Canada a reality this year.

canada lake

Work in an in-demand industry, and land a job before you go

An obvious start, but make sure you’ve researched what jobs are actually in demand in Canada. You’ll get extra points on your visa application if you have a qualifying job offer from a Canadian employer.

We’ve compiled a post about Canada’s latest skill shortages – check it out to see if your occupation is needed in Canada.

If your occupation is on there, start your job search. You can try Working In Canada’s job board which is frequently updated.

If your occupation isn’t on the list, there are other visa options available to you – see ‘Get clued up on Canadian visas’ below.

Meet Canadian employers face-to-face

Or, even better than a job board, you could visit the Working International Expo. This October we’re coming to London and Dublin (our boutique, Canada-only show) with Canadian employers recruiting for a range of job skills and industries.  Attending an expo is a great way to meet these Canadian employers face to face. You’ll get the opportunity to sell your skills and experience and you may even interview while you’re there.

consider a move outside the big cities

Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver are really popular with would-be Canadians, so think about making the move to some of the smaller provinces. The provinces experience critical skill shortages (meaning they’re more likely to look internationally for the skills they need) but still offer the incredible lifestyle and landscape of Canada’s major cities (arguably more so, as they’re less populated).

Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) operates currently in these provinces:

  • Alberta
  • Manitoba
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Yukon
  • British Columbia
  • New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia
  • Saskatchewan
  • Ontario

PNP applications are given preference over other skilled visa applications (like the Federal Skilled Worker stream) by Citizenship & Immigration Canada, as they look to find the skills the provinces really need.

Get clued up on Canadian visas

There are multiple visa options into Canada for skilled workers, entrepreneurs, business owners, students, family members, and more.

The best way to understand the different routes into Canada and the options available to you is to get specialist visa advice.  At the Working International Expo, we’ve got Canadian visa experts (like Brazolot Migration Group) on hand to guide you through your different options and the visa process.

You can also explore Citizenship & Immigration Canada’s website to determine your eligibility.

Show your commitment

Canadian employers want to see an understanding about what relocating to Canada will really mean to you – and they want to see your commitment to making your new life work.

Have you ever visited Canada?  Do you have family in Canada?  Will you be bringing all your family with you to Canada? Or will all of your family be back home? How will you adjust to your new life?  Are you in it for the long haul or will you turn around and head back home after only a few months?

Consider the above questions and be sure that a move to Canada is right for you.

…It is? Great, going to the Working International Expo is a good way to show your commitment and enthusiasm. You can research all your visa options, meet potential employers and sort your move – from arranging professional movers to opening a bank account.

Make the move to Canada this October

You can arrange your move to Canada this October without leaving the UK or Ireland. The Working International Expo is coming to London, Dublin (our boutique, one-day expo featuring Canadian employers only), and Manchester, starting in a fortnight!

See you there!

Aurora Borealis, Canada

Canada’s Express Entry System Simplified

We really like this little infographic on Canada’s new Express Entry system.  It makes migrating to Canada look easy!

infographic-expressentry

It can be almost this easy – find your dream job with a little help from Working In Canada, and breeze through the immigration process with the help of one of our immigration experts (like Canada Immigration Partners).

Infographic supplied by Mathew & Miho at Canada Immigration Partners, Vancouver

Canada’s Express Entry System – Part 2

The second article in a series of three on Canada’s Express Entry system, written by Miho and Matthew of Canada Immigration Partners (Vancouver).

Express Entry – Reviewing The Scoring System

In the second part of our three-part series on Canada’s new Express Entry system, we look at what you need to succeed. We examine the Comprehensive Ranking Score (CRS) system and discuss the advantages of a validated Canadian job offer showing you how you can be ranked at the top of the pile.

Also in this part we provide analysis on the draws thus far and our opinions on how low we could see the Express Entry cut off score go in 2015.

Gastown, Canada

Why Express Entry?

The purpose of Express Entry is to select immigrants who demonstrate desirable characteristics such as language, recognized credentials and specific skills sets, which are known to be beneficial for the settlement and integration of new immigrants and for effective contribution to the Canadian economy. As a result of Express Entry’s active selection, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is able to control applications for permanent residency allowing for faster processing times. CIC claims that 80% of applications will be processed in six months or less. 

Your first point of consideration for Express Entry will be whether or not you qualify under a Federal Immigration category. If yes, then your next step is to assess if you have a competitive CRS score, the optimization of your CRS score and whether you have a Canadian job offer. This could mean the difference of being selected and not being selected.

Your “core human capital” score is calculated based on your age, education, language and work experience. The maximum score for this section is 600 points.

You can double your score if you have a ‘validated job offer’ in the form of a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) or Provincial Nomination (PN), giving you an additional 600 points. The former means a Province has nominated you because of the skills you can bring to Canada, and the latter means that your new Canadian employer has proven that there is a genuine labour shortage and that a Canadian citizen cannot be found to fill the position.

In theory, with a validated job offer, the maximum anyone can receive is 1200 points with a perfect CRS score. To-date, the lowest score required to receive an Invitation to Apply has been 453 points out of a possible 1200 points.

Reviewing The Requirements

You will need to provide information about your marital status (single, married or common-law) as well as any dependents you might have (children). You will also be asked about your education and work experience as well as your language skills. Canada has two official languages: English and French, so speaking one or both of these will give you a higher score. 

When it comes to immigration, one of the Government’s main concerns is to ensure that its citizens are not losing employment opportunities to foreign workers. By having a LMIA or Provincial Nomination with your application you are showing the need for your immigration, as it will benefit the Canadian economy.

The Lower the Score, the Higher the Invitations

Citizenship and Immigration Canada has set the 2015 target for economic class immigration at 185,000 applicants. Accounting for family members, a conservative estimate is that 90,000 to 100,000 people will need to receive an Invitation To Apply in 2015 in order for the Federal Government to reach its targets. This means as the year progresses and they still have tens of thousands of invitations to submit, the cut off score must decrease in order to allow for these invitations to be processed.  

This is what we have been seeing month-over-month. At the beginning of the program, the cut off CRS was over 900 points, yet less than 800 invitations were sent out. And the more draws they went through, the lower the score (on average). We have also seen that as the score decreased (as low as 453 points), more invitations were submitted (over 1600).

What Does This Mean For New Applications?

It means as we near the fall and winter, we are likely to continue to see the CRS decrease as an overall trend, though by smaller increments and we may even see the CRS go below 400. As a result, we will likely see the number of invitations continue to increase, enabling the government to meet their annual quota.  

Although the CRS score requirement is trending down, you still need to ensure you have the highest score possible. Because this is a ‘pool’ system, like a lottery, you still want to make sure you have a high score, as you don’t know what the cut off score will be.

Remember To Be Honest!

The Comprehensive Ranking Score (CRS) is there to rank all the different applicants based on several criteria. The higher your score the better your chances of receiving an ‘Invitation To Apply’ for residency in Canada.

If you receive an ‘Invitation To Apply’, then it is your duty to submit proof of all the information you’ve claimed on your online application, as well as other documentation. Should it become evident that you have embellished or misrepresented your skills, experience or education you could receive a 5 year ban from applying to be a permanent resident in Canada. But be warned, the reality is once the government knows you’ve misrepresented yourself, it is very difficult to have a successful application.

So, the most important thing to take away is that your Express Entry online application needs to be entirely truthful and accurate otherwise you will come into some issues down the road.

Do I Qualify?

In the last six months we have received inquiries from people around the world wondering if they have what it takes to submit an Express Entry online application. The reality is Express Entry is not for everyone. There is a way to determine if you are eligible for Express Entry and if it’s an option for you, or if you should pursue other immigration avenues.

You can take our free online assessment to determine if your score will place you high enough in the pool of applicants, or if you should consider other options. Alternatively, you can always call us to schedule a one-on-one consultation and either Miho or Matthew of Canada Immigration Partners can assess your eligibility for Express Entry and immigration to Canada.

 

More Information / Contact

Click here to see how Miho and Matthew of Canada Immigration Partners can help you.

– Written by Miho and Matthew of Canada Immigration Partners, for the Working In Blog

The Jobs in Demand In Canada

On 1 January 2015, Canada launched its most exciting immigration overhaul yet – Express Entry.  A smarter and more streamlined process, it aims to get the skills and experience Canada needs into the country quicker than before.

If you’re one of 347 eligible occupations and meet certain criteria, you could successfully move, live and work in Canada and start living the Canadian dream.

Quebec

Are you eligible for Express Entry?

To be able to apply for Canada’s Federal Skilled Worker program, you need to use Express Entry. To be eligible for Express Entry you must meet all of the below criteria:

  • Your occupation is on the eligible occupation list (see below) and have one year of continuous full-time paid work experience or the equivalent in part-time continuous employment within the past 10 years;
  • Your work experience must be classified by Canada’s National Occupational Classification system as Skill Type 0 (Managerial Occupations), Skill Level A (Professional Occupation) or Skill Level B (Technical Occupations and Skilled Trades);
  • You must score sufficient points under the skilled worker point grid that has six selection factors including language skills, education, age, and work experience. The current pass mark is 67 out of 100;
  • You must undergo language testing to prove your English or French language skills;
  • You must have enough funds to allow you to settle in Canada;
  • You must successfully pass a background security check and medical exam.

How Express Entry Works

If you’re interested in applying for Express Entry, here’s how the process works:

  1. Fill out an online profile that includes details of your language test scores and work experience. There is no charge to do this.
  2. Your application then goes into a pool with other applicants where you’ll be ranked against other applicants. You can remain in the pool for up to one year.  If after a year you haven’t been invited to apply, your application will expire.
  3. If you’re a top candidate, you will receive an invitation to apply.
  4. If you’re invited to apply, you can apply online for permanent residency.

The current processing time is six months or less.

Eligible Occupations

Before you apply for Express Entry, you need to make sure that your occupation is on the eligible occupation list. There are 347 occupations on this list – for the full list, check out our separate blog entry.

Where to go for Help

To help you through the Express Entry process, there are places you can go:

You can also start your job search today, for jobs located in Canada – good luck!

Great Bear Rainforest

Canada’s Skills Shortage List – the Eligible Occupations (listed 1-347)

map-of-canada

As at today’s date (19 August 2015), there are 347 jobs on Canada’s Skills Shortage list.  You will need to be skilled in your chosen area in order to apply via Express Entry, to obtain a visa to live and work in the country (your skill levels will be assessed later in this process).

  1. 0011 Legislators
  2. 0012 Senior government managers and officials
  3. 0013 Senior managers – financial, communications and other business services
  4. 0014 Senior managers – health, education, social and community services and membership organizations
  5. 0015 Senior managers – trade, broadcasting and other services, n.e.c.
  6. 0016 Senior managers – construction, transportation, production and utilities
  7. 0111 Financial managers
  8. 0112 Human resources managers
  9. 0113 Purchasing managers
  10. 0114 Other administrative services managers
  11. 0121 Insurance, real estate and financial brokerage managers
  12. 0122 Banking, credit and other investment managers
  13. 0124 Advertising, marketing and public relations managers
  14. 0125 Other business services managers
  15. 0131 Telecommunication carriers managers
  16. 0132 Postal and courier services managers
  17. 0211 Engineering managers
  18. 0212 Architecture and science managers
  19. 0213 Computer and information systems managers
  20. 0311 Managers in health care
  21. 0411 Government managers – health and social policy development and program administration
  22. 0412 Government managers – economic analysis, policy development and program administration
  23. 0413 Government managers – education policy development and program administration
  24. 0414 Other managers in public administration
  25. 0421 Administrators – post-secondary education and vocational training
  26. 0422 School principals and administrators of elementary and secondary education
  27. 0423 Managers in social, community and correctional services
  28. 0431 Commissioned police officers
  29. 0432 Fire chiefs and senior firefighting officers
  30. 0433 Commissioned officers of the Canadian Forces
  31. 0511 Library, archive, museum and art gallery managers
  32. 0512 Managers – publishing, motion pictures, broadcasting and performing arts
  33. 0513 Recreation, sports and fitness program and service directors
  34. 0601 Corporate sales managers
  35. 0621 Retail and wholesale trade managers
  36. 0631 Restaurant and food service managers
  37. 0632 Accommodation service managers
  38. 0651 Managers in customer and personal services, n.e.c.
  39. 0711 Construction managers
  40. 0712 Home building and renovation managers
  41. 0714 Facility operation and maintenance managers
  42. 0731 Managers in transportation
  43. 0811 Managers in natural resources production and fishing
  44. 0821 Managers in agriculture
  45. 0822 Managers in horticulture
  46. 0823 Managers in aquaculture
  47. 0911 Manufacturing managers
  48. 0912 Utilities managers
  49. 1111 Financial auditors and accountants
  50. 1112 Financial and investment analysts
  51. 1113 Securities agents, investment dealers and brokers
  52. 1114 Other financial officers
  53. 1121 Human resources professionals
  54. 1122 Professional occupations in business management consulting
  55. 1123 Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations
  56. 1211 Supervisors, general office and administrative support workers
  57. 1212 Supervisors, finance and insurance office workers
  58. 1213 Supervisors, library, correspondence and related information workers
  59. 1214 Supervisors, mail and message distribution occupations
  60. 1215 Supervisors, supply chain, tracking and scheduling co-ordination occupations
  61. 1221 Administrative officers
  62. 1222 Executive assistants
  63. 1223 Human resources and recruitment officers
  64. 1224 Property administrators
  65. 1225 Purchasing agents and officers
  66. 1226 Conference and event planners
  67. 1227 Court officers and justices of the peace
  68. 1228 Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers
  69. 1241 Administrative assistants
  70. 1242 Legal administrative assistants
  71. 1243 Medical administrative assistants
  72. 1251 Court reporters, medical transcriptionists and related occupations
  73. 1252 Health information management occupations
  74. 1253 Records management technicians
  75. 1254 Statistical officers and related research support occupations
  76. 1311 Accounting technicians and bookkeepers
  77. 1312 Insurance adjusters and claims examiners
  78. 1313 Insurance underwriters
  79. 1314 Assessors, valuators and appraisers
  80. 1315 Customs, ship and other brokers
  81. 2111 Physicists and astronomers
  82. 2112 Chemists
  83. 2113 Geoscientists and oceanographers
  84. 2114 Meteorologists and climatologists
  85. 2115 Other professional occupations in physical sciences
  86. 2121 Biologists and related scientists
  87. 2122 Forestry professionals
  88. 2123 Agricultural representatives, consultants and specialists
  89. 2131 Civil engineers
  90. 2132 Mechanical engineers
  91. 2133 Electrical and electronics engineers
  92. 2134 Chemical engineers
  93. 2141 Industrial and manufacturing engineers
  94. 2142 Metallurgical and materials engineers
  95. 2143 Mining engineers
  96. 2144 Geological engineers
  97. 2145 Petroleum engineers
  98. 2146 Aerospace engineers
  99. 2147 Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers)
  100. 2148 Other professional engineers, n.e.c.
  101. 2151 Architects
  102. 2152 Landscape architects
  103. 2153 Urban and land use planners
  104. 2154 Land surveyors
  105. 2161 Mathematicians, statisticians and actuaries
  106. 2171 Information systems analysts and consultants
  107. 2172 Database analysts and data administrators
  108. 2173 Software engineers and designers
  109. 2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers
  110. 2175 Web designers and developers
  111. 2211 Chemical technologists and technicians
  112. 2212 Geological and mineral technologists and technicians
  113. 2221 Biological technologists and technicians
  114. 2222 Agricultural and fish products inspectors
  115. 2223 Forestry technologists and technicians
  116. 2224 Conservation and fishery officers
  117. 2225 Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
  118. 2231 Civil engineering technologists and technicians
  119. 2232 Mechanical engineering technologists and technicians
  120. 2233 Industrial engineering and manufacturing technologists and technicians
  121. 2234 Construction estimators
  122. 2241 Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
  123. 2242 Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment)
  124. 2243 Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics
  125. 2244 Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors
  126. 2251 Architectural technologists and technicians
  127. 2252 Industrial designers
  128. 2253 Drafting technologists and technicians
  129. 2254 Land survey technologists and technicians
  130. 2255 Technical occupations in geomatics and meteorology
  131. 2261 Non-destructive testers and inspection technicians
  132. 2262 Engineering inspectors and regulatory officers
  133. 2263 Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
  134. 2264 Construction inspectors
  135. 2271 Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors
  136. 2272 Air traffic controllers and related occupations
  137. 2273 Deck officers, water transport
  138. 2274 Engineer officers, water transport
  139. 2275 Railway traffic controllers and marine traffic regulators
  140. 2281 Computer network technicians
  141. 2282 User support technicians
  142. 2283 Information systems testing technicians
  143. 3011 Nursing co-ordinators and supervisors
  144. 3012 Registered nurses and registered psychiatric nurses
  145. 3111 Specialist physicians
  146. 3112 General practitioners and family physicians
  147. 3113 Dentists
  148. 3114 Veterinarians
  149. 3121 Optometrists
  150. 3122 Chiropractors
  151. 3124 Allied primary health practitioners
  152. 3125 Other professional occupations in health diagnosing and treating
  153. 3131 Pharmacists
  154. 3132 Dietitians and nutritionists
  155. 3141 Audiologists and speech-language pathologists
  156. 3142 Physiotherapists
  157. 3143 Occupational therapists
  158. 3144 Other professional occupations in therapy and assessment
  159. 3211 Medical laboratory technologists
  160. 3212 Medical laboratory technicians and pathologists’ assistants
  161. 3213 Animal health technologists and veterinary technicians
  162. 3214 Respiratory therapists, clinical perfusionists and cardiopulmonary technologists
  163. 3215 Medical radiation technologists
  164. 3216 Medical sonographers
  165. 3217 Cardiology technologists and electrophysiological diagnostic technologists, n.e.c.
  166. 3219 Other medical technologists and technicians (except dental health)
  167. 3221 Denturists
  168. 3222 Dental hygienists and dental therapists
  169. 3223 Dental technologists, technicians and laboratory assistants
  170. 3231 Opticians
  171. 3232 Practitioners of natural healing
  172. 3233 Licensed practical nurses
  173. 3234 Paramedical occupations
  174. 3236 Massage therapists
  175. 3237 Other technical occupations in therapy and assessment
  176. 4011 University professors and lecturers
  177. 4012 Post-secondary teaching and research assistants
  178. 4021 College and other vocational instructors
  179. 4031 Secondary school teachers
  180. 4032 Elementary school and kindergarten teachers
  181. 4033 Educational counsellors
  182. 4111 Judges
  183. 4112 Lawyers and Quebec notaries
  184. 4151 Psychologists
  185. 4152 Social workers
  186. 4153 Family, marriage and other related counsellors
  187. 4154 Professional occupations in religion
  188. 4155 Probation and parole officers and related occupations
  189. 4156 Employment counsellors
  190. 4161 Natural and applied science policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  191. 4162 Economists and economic policy researchers and analysts
  192. 4163 Business development officers and marketing researchers and consultants
  193. 4164 Social policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  194. 4165 Health policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  195. 4166 Education policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  196. 4167 Recreation, sports and fitness policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  197. 4168 Program officers unique to government
  198. 4169 Other professional occupations in social science, n.e.c.
  199. 4211 Paralegal and related occupations
  200. 4212 Social and community service workers
  201. 4214 Early childhood educators and assistants
  202. 4215 Instructors of persons with disabilities
  203. 4216 Other instructors
  204. 4217 Other religious occupations
  205. 4311 Police officers (except commissioned)
  206. 4312 Firefighters
  207. 4313 Non-commissioned ranks of the Canadian Forces
  208. 5111 Librarians
  209. 5112 Conservators and curators
  210. 5113 Archivists
  211. 5121 Authors and writers
  212. 5122 Editors
  213. 5123 Journalists
  214. 5125 Translators, terminologists and interpreters
  215. 5131 Producers, directors, choreographers and related occupations
  216. 5132 Conductors, composers and arrangers
  217. 5133 Musicians and singers
  218. 5134 Dancers
  219. 5135 Actors and comedians
  220. 5136 Painters, sculptors and other visual artists
  221. 5211 Library and public archive technicians
  222. 5212 Technical occupations related to museums and art galleries
  223. 5221 Photographers
  224. 5222 Film and video camera operators
  225. 5223 Graphic arts technicians
  226. 5224 Broadcast technicians
  227. 5225 Audio and video recording technicians
  228. 5226 Other technical and co-ordinating occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting and the performing arts
  229. 5227 Support occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting, photography and the performing arts
  230. 5231 Announcers and other broadcasters
  231. 5232 Other performers, n.e.c.
  232. 5241 Graphic designers and illustrators
  233. 5242 Interior designers and interior decorators
  234. 5243 Theatre, fashion, exhibit and other creative designers
  235. 5244 Artisans and craftspersons
  236. 5245 Patternmakers – textile, leather and fur products
  237. 5251 Athletes
  238. 5252 Coaches
  239. 5253 Sports officials and referees
  240. 5254 Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
  241. 6211 Retail sales supervisors
  242. 6221 Technical sales specialists – wholesale trade
  243. 6222 Retail and wholesale buyers
  244. 6231 Insurance agents and brokers
  245. 6232 Real estate agents and salespersons
  246. 6235 Financial sales representatives
  247. 6311 Food service supervisors
  248. 6312 Executive housekeepers
  249. 6313 Accommodation, travel, tourism and related services supervisors
  250. 6314 Customer and information services supervisors
  251. 6315 Cleaning supervisors
  252. 6316 Other services supervisors
  253. 6321 Chefs
  254. 6322 Cooks
  255. 6331 Butchers, meat cutters and fishmongers – retail and wholesale
  256. 6332 Bakers
  257. 6341 Hairstylists and barbers
  258. 6342 Tailors, dressmakers, furriers and milliners
  259. 6343 Shoe repairers and shoemakers
  260. 6344 Jewellers, jewellery and watch repairers and related occupations
  261. 6345 Upholsterers
  262. 6346 Funeral directors and embalmers
  263. 7201 Contractors and supervisors, machining, metal forming, shaping and erecting trades and related occupations
  264. 7202 Contractors and supervisors, electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
  265. 7203 Contractors and supervisors, pipefitting trades
  266. 7204 Contractors and supervisors, carpentry trades
  267. 7205 Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades, installers, repairers and servicers
  268. 7231 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
  269. 7232 Tool and die makers
  270. 7233 Sheet metal workers
  271. 7234 Boilermakers
  272. 7235 Structural metal and platework fabricators and fitters
  273. 7236 Ironworkers
  274. 7237 Welders and related machine operators
  275. 7241 Electricians (except industrial and power system)
  276. 7242 Industrial electricians
  277. 7243 Power system electricians
  278. 7244 Electrical power line and cable workers
  279. 7245 Telecommunications line and cable workers
  280. 7246 Telecommunications installation and repair workers
  281. 7247 Cable television service and maintenance technicians
  282. 7251 Plumbers
  283. 7252 Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers
  284. 7253 Gas fitters
  285. 7271 Carpenters
  286. 7272 Cabinetmakers
  287. 7281 Bricklayers
  288. 7282 Concrete finishers
  289. 7283 Tile setters
  290. 7284 Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers and lathers
  291. 7291 Roofers and shinglers
  292. 7292 Glaziers
  293. 7293 Insulators
  294. 7294 Painters and decorators (except interior decorators)
  295. 7295 Floor covering installers
  296. 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades
  297. 7302 Contractors and supervisors, heavy equipment operator crews
  298. 7303 Supervisors, printing and related occupations
  299. 7304 Supervisors, railway transport operations
  300. 7305 Supervisors, motor transport and other ground transit operators
  301. 7311 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
  302. 7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics
  303. 7313 Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
  304. 7314 Railway Carmen/women
  305. 7315 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
  306. 7316 Machine fitters
  307. 7318 Elevator constructors and mechanics
  308. 7321 Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics and mechanical repairers
  309. 7322 Motor vehicle body repairers
  310. 7331 Oil and solid fuel heating mechanics
  311. 7332 Appliance servicers and repairers
  312. 7333 Electrical mechanics
  313. 7334 Motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics
  314. 7335 Other small engine and small equipment repairers
  315. 7361 Railway and yard locomotive engineers
  316. 7362 Railway conductors and brakemen/women
  317. 7371 Crane operators
  318. 7372 Drillers and blasters – surface mining, quarrying and construction
  319. 7373 Water well drillers
  320. 7381 Printing press operators
  321. 7384 Other trades and related occupations, n.e.c.
  322. 8211 Supervisors, logging and forestry
  323. 8221 Supervisors, mining and quarrying
  324. 8222 Contractors and supervisors, oil and gas drilling and services
  325. 8231 Underground production and development miners
  326. 8232 Oil and gas well drillers, servicers, testers and related workers
  327. 8241 Logging machinery operators
  328. 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers8255 Contractors and supervisors, landscaping, grounds maintenance and horticulture services
  329. 8261 Fishing masters and officers
  330. 8262 Fishermen/women
  331. 9211 Supervisors, mineral and metal processing
  332. 9212 Supervisors, petroleum, gas and chemical processing and utilities
  333. 9213 Supervisors, food, beverage and associated products processing
  334. 9214 Supervisors, plastic and rubber products manufacturing
  335. 9215 Supervisors, forest products processing
  336. 9217 Supervisors, textile, fabric, fur and leather products processing and manufacturing
  337. 9221 Supervisors, motor vehicle assembling
  338. 9222 Supervisors, electronics manufacturing
  339. 9223 Supervisors, electrical products manufacturing
  340. 9224 Supervisors, furniture and fixtures manufacturing
  341. 9226 Supervisors, other mechanical and metal products manufacturing
  342. 9227 Supervisors, other products manufacturing and assembly
  343. 9231 Central control and process operators, mineral and metal processing
  344. 9232 Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
  345. 9235 Pulping, papermaking and coating control operators
  346. 9241 Power engineers and power systems operators
  347. 9243 Water and waste treatment plant operators

The Skills in High Demand in Australia

Whether it’s calling one of the world’s most liveable cities home (hello Melbourne), exploring some of the most famous skylines (hi Sydney) or losing yourself (not literally we hope) in the stunning job opportunities in the outback, Australia offers a lot to potential new Aussies.

If you’ve got the skills and experience Australia needs then you could be moving, living, working and playing there soon. See if your skills are in demand in Australia.

Sydney Harbour

About the Skilled Occupation List (SOL)

The SOL is updated regularly to reflect the changing needs of Australia. You need to nominate an occupation on the SOL if you’re applying for:

  • Independent points-based skilled migration and you’re not nominated by a state or territory government agency – this is SkillSelect
  • A Family Sponsored Points Tested visa
  • A Temporary Graduate visa (subclass 485) – Graduate Work stream

About SkillSelect

SkillSelect is how Australia chooses which applicants to invite to apply for a visa. To apply you submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) online. You’ll then go into a pool of other applicants where you’ll be ranked on things like your work experience, skills, age and language abilities.

Depending on your ranking in the pool of applicants, you may then be invited to apply for a visa.

Find out more about SkillSelect.

The skills on the SOL

There are currently 191 occupations on the SOL. If you need a skills assessment as part of your visa application, you need to contact the assessing authority directly to get this. They will provide all the necessary forms and information you need and there will be a cost for this.

View the SOL, along with details of the relevant assessing authorities.

The Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List (CSOL)

If you’re applying for a visa under these programs:

  • Points-based skilled migration and you’re nominated by a state or territory government agency under a State Migration Plan
  • The Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS), and you’ve been nominated by an Australian employer to fill a position in an occupation that appears in the CSOL
  • The Temporary Work (Skilled) visa – subclass 457
  • The Training and Research visa (subclass 402)

You need to find your occupation on the CSOL, not the SOL.

View the current CSOL.

Get help with your Australian visa

To help you through the Australian visa process, you can:

You can also start searching for your new job today – good luck!

Canada’s Express Entry Immigration System – Part 1

Following our blog last month, we received a number of queries on the new Express Entry system – a new immigration process which came into effect in Canada in January 2015.  Our partners in Vancouver, Miho and Matthew of Canada Immigration Partners, have written a step-by-step, three-part guide on how to use this new system, should you wish to apply for a Canadian visa.

Express Entry Overview

Vancouver Waterfront

Immigrating to Canada via Express Entry

The Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada has developed a new online application system, to assess those seeking permanent residence in Canada.

The system, which was launched in January 2015, is specifically designed to selectively control the flow of immigrants to Canada, providing faster processing times for those who qualify for an Invitation To Apply and responding to the needs of the Canadian labour market. 

Express Entry is best used by people with verifiable work experience, educational and professional credentials, as well as language proficiency (English and French) that will help them settle and contribute to Canada’s society and economy as a whole.  To qualify for Express Entry you must be eligible under at least one of three Federal Immigration programs: Federal Skilled Worker Program, Federal Skilled Trades Program or Canadian Experience Class.

There are Many Steps in the Process

The online application system is only the first step in the Express Entry process. Once your application is submitted, you will be entered into the pool of candidates. Your application will be scored and based on that score, the top candidates will be offered an Invitation to Apply for permanent residence. This can take up to 12 months to receive, if at all.  The second step can only be completed once you receive your invitation, and you have only 60 days (two months) to do so, or you forfeit the invitation. 

Your Express Entry application is valid for 12 months, and there is no limit as to the number of people who can submit an Express Entry application – but there is an annual limit to the number of people offered an Invitation to Apply for permanent residence.  For 2015, that number is set for 185,000 economic class immigrants and their families.  Once that number is reached, the quota will reset for 2016.  If you are not offered an invitation within 12 months, you will be invited to resubmit your Expression of Interest application again.

What Will the Express Entry Application Ask?

The application profile will require you to submit truthful and verifiable information about your employment skills, work experience, language ability, education, as well as any other details that may help the government assess your employability and your overall contribution to Canadian society.

Your profile will be scored against other candidates in the pool based on the Comprehensive Ranking System.  This system is designed to determine your eligibility based on your skills and experience as described above.  Those with the highest scores will be issued an Invitation to Apply for permanent residence first.

Can You Guarantee I Will Be Picked from the Pool?

 The truth is, no one can guarantee that you will be picked from the pool of candidates. But you can improve your chances by securing a validated Canadian job offer. These come in two forms:

(a) Nomination from a Province or Territory

(b) Labour Market Impact Assessment

If your application includes one of the above, you will automatically score 600 points out of a possible 1,200 points. But remember, education, work experience and languages also play a mandatory part in your score.

Long Road

Free Online Assessment

If you are unsure of how you would score, you can take a free online assessment to help guide you and to determine if Express Entry is right for you.

Please visit the CIP website to complete our short eligibility form. Please note: this is an initial assessment to see if you qualify for a Federal Immigration Program and Express Entry. A more detailed evaluation should be performed before submitting your official application to the government.

Important Note 

Submitting an online profile for Express Entry does not automatically qualify you to receive an Invitation to Apply for permanent residence in Canada. Once you submit your profile, and your profile is accepted into the pool of candidates, your profile will be ranked.

This is an ‘active selection’ system which means once you have been ranked amongst your peers, the Canadian Government will continue to select candidates on an ongoing basis.  This means you could wait up to 12 months before finding out if you have been selected to receive an Invitation to Apply.  However, you might not receive your Invitation to Apply, which means you will have to resubmit another Express Entry application.  If you do receive an invitation, this is just the first step and you must still meet all other requirements under Canada’s immigration law.

What Happens After I Receive An Invitation To Apply?

If you have received an Invitation to Apply, congratulations!  You are on your way to becoming a Canadian permanent resident. However, you’re not quite there yet.  Once you receive your invitation, you only have 60 days (2 months) to respond by completing an electronic application for permanent residence.

Because of this time constraint, it is very important that you start getting your response ready immediately, as many of the requirements can take several weeks to receive back (like a police check, for example).  The team at CIP Consulting has developed a process whereby 90% of your application is complete when you submit your Expression of Interest, which means you won’t have to stress about completing the electronic application.

Once your electronic application for permanent residence has been submitted, the department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada will try to process your application within six months or less.

Learn More About Express Entry

Applying for Canadian permanent residence is a time-consuming and challenging process.  If you would like to speak with an immigration expert, please contact Miho or Matthew of Canada Immigration Partners at 1.888.508.5308, or visit us online to learn more about how we can help you.

– Written by Miho and Matthew of Canada Immigration Partners, for the Working In Blog

CIP-logo-web

Immigration News Roundup – July 2015

We keep a lookout for recent immigration changes in Australia, Canada and New Zealand so that you don’t have to. This month discover Australia’s migration trends over the past year, and see whether you’re in demand in South Australia.  Find out about two new Canadian immigration schemes, and see how a licensed immigration adviser can help with your New Zealand online visa application.

Australia

Australia’s Migration Trends 2013–2014

The Australian Department of Immigration and Border Protection has recently released a new report called Australia’s Migration Trends 2013–2014. Some of the key statistics from the report are that in the 2013–2014 programme year:

  • 207,947 permanent migration visas were granted – a decrease of 4.2 per cent on the previous year.
  • This included 190,000 places under Australia’s migration programme.
  • Of the migration programme’s 190,000 visas:
    • 128,550 visas (or 67.7 per cent) were granted through the skill stream.
    • 61,112 visas (or 32.2 per cent) were granted through the family stream.
    • 338 visas (or 0.2 per cent) were granted under the special eligibility visa category.
  • The place where most people moved from was India, with 39,026 places (that’s a 20.5 per cent share).
  • This was followed by the People’s Republic of China (26,776 places) and the UK (23,220 places).
  • Demand for the Temporary Work (Skilled) (subclass 457) visas decreased significantly. Grants for these visas fell 22.0 per cent which may be due to the government’s February 2014 review of the 457 process.

Check out the full report for further details.

Revised South Australia State Occupation List

On 1 July 2015, Immigration South Australia published a revised State Occupation List. Visit Immigration South Australia to view the new list. This list gives you an idea of what skills and jobs are in demand in South Australia. New English requirements for South Australia There have been some changes to the English requirements for some occupations on the South Australia State Occupation List including:

  • ICT occupations – Proficient English is required in each band score (or an overall score of Proficient Plus, i.e. IELTS 7.5 overall).
  • Engineering occupations – Competent Plus English (or an overall score of Proficient, i.e. IELTS 7 overall).

The State Occupation List contains the changes to the English requirements for other occupations.

Canada

Express Entry points requirement decreasing

The new Express Entry system for skilled migration to Canada involves creating a pool of potential applicants, who are invited to apply for a visa through a regular draw. Applicants are awarded points based on certain criteria, like their skills, experience, language capabilities, work history, etc. Two recent draws in June 2015 have seen the level of applicants’ points decreasing yet the number of invitations to apply for a visa increasing. This means meeting the requirements for skilled entry to Canada may be getting a little easier.

New immigration schemes for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia

Two eastern Canadian provinces, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, have recently announced new immigration schemes that are looking for skilled newcomers from overseas. The streams are aligned with the federal Express Entry systems. Although you don’t need a job offer from a Canadian employer to make an application, you must be eligible for either the:

Follow the links to find out more about the New Brunswick Express Entry Labour Market Stream or Nova Scotia Experience: Express Entry.

New Zealand

‘Apply on behalf’ now live

Immigration New Zealand has launched a new service called ‘Apply on Behalf’. This means that licensed immigration advisers and other people exempt from licensing, like lawyers, can now apply for visas online on your behalf. This means they can:

  • Start a new online application for a Student, Work or Visitor visa
  • Complete the application in much the same way as you can
  • View submitted applications and upload supporting documents

This means you could benefit from expert support when it comes to completing your visa application online – and it’s one less thing for you to do. Visa-and-Passport

Seven things you’ll need when applying for an Australia, Canada or New Zealand visa

Australia, Canada and New Zealand have plenty of differences. From national pastimes (one loves cricket, another ice hockey) to national animals (one has moose and the other has kiwis). Or from temperature extremes (the bone chilling Canadian -63 degrees and the Australian sweltering 53 degrees) to local slang (don’t forget your bathers in Australia and to say “chur” in New Zealand).

But, when it comes to filling out your visa application, they do share some similarities.

Regardless of which country you want to move to – Australia, Canada or New Zealand – there are certain things you’ll need when it comes to applying for your visa:

  1. A valid passport

Let’s start with the obvious: you need to have a valid passport that’s not due to expire for at least six months.

You may be required to send your original passport with your application, or provide a certified copy. This means someone needs to witness your original documents and sign, stamp or endorse that the copies are true copies of the original documents. People who can certify copies must be authorised by law to take statutory declarations, like lawyers or court officials.

  1. Evidence of good character

Depending on the type of visa you are applying for, you may need to prove that you’re of good character. This may take the form of a list of questions that you need to tick ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to. These questions could include criminal convictions you may have or whether you’ve been involved in terrorist activities.

You’ll normally also need to provide a recent police certificate that shows whether you’ve got a criminal record.  The police certificate should be less than six months old for NZ visas; less than twelve months old for Australia visas; and for Canada visas the police certificate requirement is dependent on the type of visa you are applying for.

You’ll need to allow time for this process – UK police certificates can take up to 10 working days and also incur costs that you’re responsible for covering.   In the UK, police certificates are handled by ACRO.

  1. Acceptable standard of health

You will need to prove that you have an acceptable standard of health – each country has different definitions of what this means.

Depending on which visa type you’re going for, you may also need to undertake medical tests. This is compulsory if you’re applying for permanent visas, but may also apply for some temporary visas too. These thorough medical checks may include:

  • X-rays
  • Full blood tests
  • Urine tests
  • Full family history

The medicals can only be performed by approved doctors, and when you provide results they should be as recent as possible. These tests can take time – not only in booking an appointment, but waiting for your results. They also cost money which you’ll need to pay.

  1. Recent passport photos

For New Zealand and Canada visas, you’ll need to supply some recent passport photos with your application. They’ll need to comply with certain regulations, like size, background colour, and what you’re allowed to wear or not.

They may also need to be signed as a true likeness by a witness.

Recent passport photos are not required for Australia visa applications.

  1. Specific policy requirements

There are plenty of different visa types for each country. However, regardless of the visa you apply for, there will be specific requirements you should be aware of. They could include having:

  • A valid job offer
  • Certain qualifications (which you’ll need to prove through university transcripts and school certificates)
  • A certain amount of savings
  • Key skills
  • Family or partner sponsorship
  1. Money for the fees

Whichever country and visa you apply for, there will be fees which you’ll need to pay. For an idea of costs, check out:

  1. Patience

Most of all, you’re going to need patience. Applying for a visa can be a lengthy, and at times frustrating, process.

Keep reminding yourself why you’re doing this and hang in there.

Where to go for help

To help you through the visa processes, there are plenty of places you can go.

Each country’s immigration website

Australia, Canada and New Zealand all have very comprehensive websites full of information about the different types of visas they offer, plus the processes involved:

Migration experts

There are many migration experts who can share their experience and expertise to help you get a visa. If you’re considering living and working in Australia or New Zealand, Migration Planners could help.

Additionally, as of June 2015, licensed immigration advisers in New Zealand can now apply online on your behalf for certain types of visas. Using an online system could help to speed up the visa process. It also means it’s one less thing for you to worry about as the experts will handle your application for you.

If you are considering moving to Canada and want expert migration advice, see our list of Canadian preferred partners on our website.

Are you thinking about making the move?

Share any concerns or questions you may have by commenting below – we’ll see if we can help.

Five Very Good Reasons to Move to Canada

Canada has 33 million inhabitants and is a world-class country that offers a vast array of scenic, cultural, and intellectual wonders. Even so, it regularly flies its maple leaf overseas to let the world know that it needs more skilled and experienced people to make it really hum.

So why would you pack your bag and make the move?

vancouver2

  1. Everyone wants to live there

If you move to Canada, you can live in one of the world’s most liveable cities. Three Canadian cities appear in The Telegraph’s list published last week: Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/property/pictures/9477990/The-worlds-10-best-cities-to-live-in.html?frame=2311063

  1. Job opportunities

Canada needs skilled people which means that there are many interesting and challenging job vacancies.  The Canadian jobless rate has been unchanged at 6.8 percent for the fourth consecutive month in May 2015. And in May 2015, the economy added 30,900 full-time jobs and 27,900 part-time jobs.

  1. Clean air, green surroundings

The air quality in Canada is amazing according to the World Health Organization which put forward a report on the global air quality. Despite being one of the largest countries in the world, Canada enjoys a very low population density. Huge tracts of land are covered by forests, and its population is largely concentrated towards the more temperate south of the country. Clean air is all you will breathe in their nation, which takes great pride in the preservation of its wildlife, and he enormous forests act as natural air filters. http://www.insidermonkey.com/blog/the-10-countries-with-the-cleanest-air-in-the-world-331264/#Cfe7gsc7dTQgfYPP.99

  1. Be part of huge scenery

Consider the Nahanni National Park Reserve which spans almost 12,000 square miles. At the 62nd parallel, it is the land of the midnight sun in Canada’s Northwest Territories. It covers the vast plains and limestone karst lands of the Ram Plateau in the Mackenzie Mountains. You can descend into Canada’s deepest ancient river canyons, reaching 3,000 feet, untouched since the last ice age.  (http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/canada/keith-bellows-favorite-canada-places/)

Nahanni National Park

5.  Canadians are really polite

Experience Canadian nice as soon as you reach customs: the US border guards are gruff and all business, the Canadians, by contrast, are unfailingly polite. The Canadian press is rife with examples of niceness in action. For instance, the National Post reports that when second-year law student Derek Murray left the headlights on all day Wednesday in his silver Acura, he returned to his parked car to find the battery drained and a note on his windshield. “I noticed you left your lights on,” the note said. “The battery will probably not have enough charge to start your vehicle. I left a blue extension cord on the fence and … a battery charger beside the fence in the cardboard box. If you know how to hook it up, use it to start your car.” The note went on to explain exactly how to jump-start the vehicle. “Good luck,” it said.  http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/edmonton-stranger-leaves-kind-note-and-battery-charger-for-student-who-forgot-to-turn-car-lights-off




Sounds amazing.

Working In can help you move there.

http://www.workingin-canada.com/

5 reasons to make the move now

If you subscribed to our email newsletter, chances are you’re seriously considering packing up your life and moving, working, living and playing in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

But you haven’t done it quite yet.

So this month, we’re telling you why you need to make the move – now.

1. Winter is coming

people-314980_1280

If you’re in the northern hemisphere, winter is coming. Unlike Game of Thrones, it doesn’t mean murder, mayhem and naughty stuff but, as a lot of Working Inners can attest to (being British expats ourselves), winter isn’t a desperately fun time. Short days, an abundance of darkness, and bad weather inevitably leads to a six-month long hibernation. Not fun. However over in Australia, Canada and New Zealand…

2. An enviable lifestyle

busselton-51434_1280

As spring blooms in the southern hemisphere, its enviable lifestyle comes to the fore. Now, for the next six months, Aussies and Kiwis are making the most of the long, hot, sunny days – whether that’s surfing, hiking, BBQ-ing, beaching, ocean swimming… the list goes on. It may also be coming into winter in Canada, but Canada does winter really well. With its blankets of snow, it’s a winter wonderland – no more hopping on a plane to reach the slopes for skiing and snowboarding, it’s on your doorstep. If you’ve ever wanted the picture perfect Christmas day, now’s the time to get over to Canada.

3. The opportunities are booming

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New Zealand came through the global financial crisis pretty unscathed, reflected in its “rock star” economy. Now there are plenty of exciting opportunities abounding – from helping to rebuild Christchurch, to citywide rail electrification projects, and multi-million dollar infrastructure investment. Australia is continuing to climb out of its downturn and more and more jobs are coming to the market, while Canada’s economy remains strong and, more importantly, continues to grow.

4. Chart-topping success

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Every single year, scores of surveys are released – the world’s best cities, the happiest places to live, the world’s best countries… and every single year, Australia, Canada and New Zealand feature highly. This is especially true for Canada – it’s got one of the world’s best reputation’s internationally [see page 17] as a place to do business and live, with Australia and New Zealand not far behind. The countries’ cities rank highly for liveability (8 out of 10 cities in the 2014 Economist Intelligence Unit’s world’s most liveable cities were in Australia, Canada and New Zealand). All three countries feature highly in the latest world happiness report. Whereas British expats reckon they’re healthiest and wealthiest in… yep, you’ve guessed it. Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Go on, you deserve to be happy and wealthy too – make the move.

5. It’s never a good time

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So why move now, rather than next year or beyond? Because, frankly, it’s never a good time to move – you’ll always be waiting for your cousin’s wedding or for your little one to start school. Like having a baby, there is never an ideal time to move country.

So you might as well to do it now.

Convinced? Start searching for your new job and life in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

Naturalised Canadian Citizenship Climbs To An All-Time High

Canada’s Citizenship and Immigration Minister, Chris Alexander, has announced that the country has welcomed its 100,000th citizen of 2014. This more than doubles the number of new citizens sworn into the Maple Nation than had been done by this time in 2013, adding further support to the claim that Canada is a firm favourite with skilled migrants looking to make their move.

Coming from over 200 countries, the 100,000 new citizens were interred at over 1,000 ceremonies taking place across Canada. This ceremony is the final step before becoming a bona-fide Canadian citizen.

To speed up the decision-making process with regards to citizenship, the Canadian Government is proposing changes in Bill C-24, the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act. According to the Government of Canada website, it is hoped that these changes will bring the average processing time for citizenship application to under a year and that the current backlog will be reduced by more than 80 percent by 2015/16.

Indeed, since 2006, Canada has attained the highest sustained levels of immigration in the country’s history, averaging 250,000 new migrants each year. On top of this, more than 85% of those eligible permanent residents become citizens, and since 2006, Canada has welcomed almost 1.5 million happy new Canadians.

“Our Government is making significant improvements to the citizenship program, and this high number of new citizens admitted so far this year demonstrates that our changes are working. Canadian citizenship is a pledge of mutual responsibility and a shared commitment to our values rooted in our history. Our Government is proud to welcome the 100,000 new citizens who have joined the Canadian family so far in 2014, and we look forward to welcoming many more new Canadians in future citizenship ceremonies across our great nation.”

Chris Alexander, Canada’s Citizenship And Immigration Minister

You can read more about attaining a Canadian visa via our website Workingin-canada.com, amongst a raft of other information, such as jobs lists, lifestyle opportunities and testimonials from ex-pats that have already moved.

Fight or flight: what to expect when you arrive in a new country

You’ve been excitedly planning your move for months but now you’ve landed and you’re not feeling so sure. Don’t worry – these feelings are absolutely normal and part of what’s known as the settlement curve.

In fact, there are six distinct stages most people go through as they settle in a new country – here’s what to expect over your first 18 months to two years.

The settlement curve

 

Diagram source: Immigration New Zealand Settlement Services.

Stage one: forethought

This stage is all about the excitement of planning with lots of positivity about your move to your new country. It’s important to have realistic expectations about your new home country, however, so now’s the time to look into jobs, get an idea of cost of living and research where you’re going to settle.

Stage two: fun

You’ve arrived and it’s brilliant fun. New people, new places and new experiences mean you’re feeling really positive about your new home.

Stage three: fright

Uh-oh. Something’s happened. It might be something major (a family member has fallen ill) or something small (you’re stuck in traffic for the fifth day in a row) – whatever it is, it’ll make you feel frustrated which in turn makes you feel unhappy.

Stage four: flight

Ok, something has happened – and you don’t have a strong network of friends or family to call on yet in your new home country. This is the point that you may decide to move on or return to your country of origin.

Stage five: fight

Time to embrace your inner Rocky. This is your turning point – you become realistic about what it’s like to live in your new country and make a conscious decision to stay and build your life here.

Stage six: fit

Welcome to everyday life. By this stage, your challenges are more about the usual day to day stuff people think about, rather than being about living in a new country. You’ve now decided to stay which helps you to feel like you ‘fit’ in. Congratulations – you’ve made it!

Dealing with the six stages

First off, remember that everyone who has ever been in your position will have experienced these emotions at some point. Understand that it’s completely normal and natural and try some of these tips to help you deal with your emotions:

  • Keep talking – to your other half, your family or your employer. Sharing your fears will help you deal with them.
  • Get out and about – the couch may be calling but that’s not going to help you feel more settled. Go for a walk, get some fresh air, make the most of that new lifestyle you were after. Remind yourself why you wanted to move.
  • Get involved – join your colleagues at the next social gathering, sign up to a gym, research local clubs – anything that gets you mingling with people and involved with your new life. Say yes to every offer that comes your way.
  • Research settlement services – there’s organisations dedicated to helping new migrants feel happy in their new homes. Check out Settlement Support New Zealand, find settlement services in Australia or search for immigration services in Canada.

Have you made the move? Did you experience a rollercoaster journey through the settlement curve? What helped you?

Top 10 hot jobs sectors in Canada for UK jobseekers

UK unemployment figures for April 2013 revealed that 2.56 million people were out of work – 7.9 per cent of the working population. Many people are looking elsewhere for job opportunities and because other European countries continue to have their own unemployment problems, increasingly jobseekers are turning their attention to North America and in particular pursuing job vacancies in Canada.

Specific sectors of the Canadian job market are experiencing growth and it is these areas that are attracting skilled UK workers.

Energy

With 2.3 projected job openings for every jobseeker by 2020, job vacancies in Canada for mining, oil and gas supervisors are likely to be most in demand, particularly in the oil-rich areas such as Fort McMurray in Alberta.

Construction

One of the fastest growing job markets in the country, Canada is in need of able construction workers, especially welders and electricians, and construction managers. As a result of the current shortage of skilled labour, Canadian immigration has been targeting British workers.

Information technology

Technology continues to advance rapidly and jobs in IT are plentiful for those with the right knowledge and up to date skills. Online business and industry specialist Canadian Business ranks software engineers and computer engineers among the top 30 jobs in 2013 in terms of projected growth and salary levels of employees.

Manufacturing

Although some types of manufacturing have seen a decline in recent years, there are plenty of job vacancies in Canada for those in engineering, including aerospace engineers, civil engineers, mechanical engineers and industrial technicians.

Catering

Canada is a popular tourist destination – in 2011 there were 15.6 million international visitors and the UK represented Canada’s largest inbound overseas market. For this reason, jobs in catering in hotels and restaurants are popular among British workers.

Leisure and hospitality

Linked to the growing hospitality industry, foreign workers often are able to find jobs with a difference as skiing instructors in the Canadian Rockies or at the country’s most popular resort in Whistler, British Columbia.

Railways

Jobs for railway and transportation supervisors already feature in the Canadian Business list of top 50 jobs and the number of vacancies is set to increase in 2020, when there will be 1.24 job openings for everyone seeking employment in the field.

Health services

Head nurses and healthcare managers are second on the list of the current top 50 jobs and by 2020 they are still in the frame with qualified candidates very much in demand. People who are trained dental hygienists will also fare well in terms of both immediate and projected requirements.

Education

Surprisingly, teaching is not a transferable occupation, as Canadian regulations require certification from the province in which a teaching vacancy is advertised. This means foreign teachers have to retrain at a Canadian university to be able to teach. However, jobs in education administration at all levels are predicted to grow and are well paid.

Entrepreneurs

In January this year the Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Minister, Jason Kenney, announced a new programme to recruit innovative immigrant entrepreneurs to help stimulate the economy. The new Start-Up Visa Program supports skilled individuals to set up their own businesses, providing lots of opportunities for imaginative entrepreneurs in many different fields.

This article was contributed by Jobmanji – a  job search engine in Canada. 

15 misconceptions about Australia, Canada and New Zealand

Australians love cork hats, Canadians live in igloos and there’s more New Zealanders than sheep, right? Actually, no. Here we blow the lid on the most common misconceptions about Australia, Canada and New Zealand.

Australia

  1. They don’t say crikey all the time: beloved croc-wrestler Steve Irwin may have coined the catchphrase “crikey!” but it’s certainly not used every day in Australia.
  2. They eat Skippy: Australia’s national icon – the kangaroo – is considered a darn tasty food source in Australia.
  3. They don’t ‘chuck shrimps on the barbie’: snaggers, yes (that’s sausages), shrimps, no. Also, they call them prawns, not shrimps.
  4. Not every animal in Australia wants to kill you: their poisonous snakes and spiders are easily avoided and they’re also home to possibly the cutest critter on the planet – the Quokka.Quokka Australia
  5. Australians don’t all live in the outback: yes, your map might show a massive country with plenty of desert-like space in the middle but in actual fact, over 90% of Australia’s population lives in urban areas on the coast.

Canada

  1. It always snows in Canada: afraid not. Their summers can be positively balmy in parts with the thermometer topping 30 degrees.
  2. Moose, bears and beavers are everywhere: if you don’t step outside the urban areas, your wildlife encounters will be restricted to pigeons and squirrels. Famed Canadian wildlife can be seen – but usually on specially planned tours. Beaver
  3. Mounties wear fancy red outfits: only on official, ceremonial occasions actually.
  4. All Canadians speak French: Statistics Canada reckons only about 22% of Canadians use French as their first language. Most of the French-speaking population lives in Quebec – where the official language is French.
  5. Toronto is the capital: it might be Canada’s largest city and the country’s financial centre but the capital is actually Ottawa.

New Zealand

  1. New Zealand is governed by Australia: definitely not. New Zealand was once governed as a part of the territory of New South Wales (now a part of Australia). When Australia federated in 1901, New Zealand was offered a place as one of their states. New Zealand refused and is its own country with no ties (other than economic and commonwealth) to Australia.
  2. There are 20 sheep to each person: no one’s going to deny New Zealand has a lot of sheep but in fact there’s presently around seven sheep to every one human.New Zealand countryside with a flock of sheep
  3. New Zealand is all one country: actually, it’s split into two islands – the imaginatively named north and south islands, both enjoying vastly different landscapes and climates. And no, there isn’t a bridge between the two islands. There is a ferry though.
  4. It’s small and everything you want to see can be done in two weeks: don’t be fooled. New Zealand’s landmass is about the same as the UK’s – and there is a heck of a lot to cram in. You could travel for months and still not do everything you want to do. It’s not a short break sort of place.
  5. The weather is incredible: it definitely can be. It can also be incredibly terrible. The far north of the north island is sub-tropical, summer is cyclone season and the south island suffers bitterly cold winters, including plenty of snow.

Top things to do if you’re celebrating Christmas in Australia, Canada or New Zealand

The countries that we work with offer the best of both worlds when it comes to Christmas. You have the traditional northern hemisphere Christmas in Canada – snow, roaring log fires and hot chocolates while wrapped up like snow bunnies. Or, you have the southern hemisphere Christmas in Australia and New Zealand – barbecues on the beach and Santa in his shorts.

Here’s our round-up of the top things to do if you find yourself in one of these countries over the festive season.

Australia

Ayers Rock Uluru Sounds of Silence Australia

  1. Make the most of the sunshine and get out on the water – especially in one of Australia’s most iconic watery spots: the Sydney Harbour. You could enjoy a harbour cruise whilst tucking into a Christmas dinner.
  2. If you’d prefer a more active Christmas day, how about climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge? That’s guaranteed to be more memorable than another turkey dinner.
  3. In keeping with the active theme, you could take a trip out to the Great Barrier Reef and spend Christmas day snorkelling or diving with the fishes.
  4. An Aussie icon – Ayers Rock or Uluru – offers an incredible dining experience on Christmas Day. Its Sounds of Silence experience includes sunset canapés, dining under the stars (a BBQ buffet, naturally) and stargazing. Sounds pretty magical to us!
  5. Of course if you really want to make the most of Christmas down under, you could just hit up one of the many beaches and enjoy a picnic or BBQ.

Canada

Capilano Canyon lights Canada

  1. Don’t miss your opportunity to see the already spectacular Niagara Falls all dressed up for Christmas with the CAA Winter Festival of Lights, with over 125 animated lighting displays and three million tree and ground lights.
  2. You could really embrace a traditional Christmas with a Prairie Christmas (at Prairie Gardens and Adventure Farm). It boasts a roaring bonfire for roasting marshmallows over, gingerbread cookie decorating, hot chocolate and hot apple cider – toasty.
  3. The Capilano Suspension Bridge Park puts on a legendary lights show for Christmas, with a zillion sparkling lights on the bridge, rainforest and cliffwalk.
  4. Enjoy Christmas up high – Grouse Mountain hosts real reindeers, sleigh-rides and ice skating in naturally snowy surrounds.
  5. Let someone else take the strain during your Canadian Christmas – and hop on a sled drawn by dogs as you explore the snowy Canadian wilderness.

New Zealand

Kelly Tarlton's Sea Life Aquarium New Zealand Santa

  1. Soak away the Christmas stress in the great outdoors in some hot pools – New Zealand’s got hundreds of ‘em. You can even dig your own at Hot Water Beach in the Coromandel.
  2. Head underwater – whilst staying dry. Check out Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life Aquarium where Santa will be feeding the fish and you can explore the brand new, snow filled penguin enclosure.
  3. If you think Christmas isn’t the same without some snow, you could head to Snowplanet for some indoor skiing, snowboarding and snow tubing.
  4. Hit up Queenstown, where the adventure never takes a Christmas break. On Christmas Day you’ll still be able to enjoy a Milford Sound flight and cruise, paragliding, a helicopter flight over The Remarkables, lake cruises, jet boating…
  5. Or for a real novelty factor, treat yourself to the only ice you’ll find in New Zealand over Christmas – ice cream. Following on from a BBQ on the beach, obviously.

Have you been to Australia, Canada or New Zealand over Christmas?

Tell us what you got up to!

Auckland, Vancouver and Sydney ranked some of the best places in the world to live

The Mercer 2012 Quality of Living Survey has just been released, and it’s full of good news for anyone looking to move to Australia, Canada or New Zealand. Vienna, Austria remains at the top of the European country dominated survey.

The survey

The survey evaluates more than 460 cities worldwide on a variety of factors to produce a snapshot of what it’s like to live there.

The survey analyses the following factors:

  • Political and social environment (political stability, crime, law enforcement)
  • Economic environment (currency exchange regulations, banking services)
  • Socio-cultural environment (censorship, limitations on personal freedom)
  • Medical and health considerations (medical supplies and services, infectious diseases, sewage, waste disposal, air pollution, etc.)
  • Schools and education (standard and availability of international schools)
  • Public services and transportation (electricity, water, public transportation, traffic congestion, etc.)
  • Recreation (restaurants, theatres, movie theatres, sports and leisure, etc.)
  • Consumer goods (availability of food/daily consumption items, cars, etc.)
  • Housing (rental housing, household appliances, furniture, maintenance services)
  • Natural environment (climate, record of natural disasters)

Auckland, New Zealand

Auckland New Zealand third in 2012 Mercer Quality of Life SurveyAuckland has retained its position as the highest-ranking city for quality of living in the Asia-Pacific region – it’s 3rd. Clearly the high standards of education, the buzzing night life and culture and clean, green surrounds of Auckland have impressed on a global scale.

Wellington also made the top 20, coming in 13th. In total, New Zealand has two cities in the top 50.

Vancouver, Canada

Vancouver Canada fifth in Mercer 2012 Quality of Living SurveyVancouver came in 5th, while other Canadian cities dominated the top of the index for the Americas region (Ottawa (14), Toronto (15), Montreal (23) and Calgary (32)). Known for its world-class green spaces, exciting culture and entertainment plus being the stage for global events (like the winter Olympics games), Vancouver has plenty to offer.

Canada boasts five cities in the top 50.

Sydney, Australia

Sydney Australia 10th in Mercer 2012 Quality of Living SurveySydney drew with Bern in Switzerland as the 10th best city in the world for quality of living. Iconic tourist attractions, an energetic metropolitan feel and a fantastic climate all make up the Sydney experience.

Australia tops the three countries with six cities in the top 50.

Here’s the top 10 best cities for quality of living 2012:

  1. Vienna, Austria
  2. Zurich, Switzerland
  3. Auckland, New Zealand
  4. Munich, Germany
  5. Vancouver, Canada
  6. Düsseldorf, Germany
  7. Frankfurt, Germany
  8. Geneva, Switzerland
  9. Copenhagen, Denmark
  10. Bern, Switzerland
  11. Sydney, Australia

Most—and least—desirable places to live
Infographic by Mercer Insights

Details of the full survey can be found here.

What do you think?

Do you agree with these findings?

The real land of opportunity

This week we have a guest post, courtesy of Amy Knapp at InsideTrak. Here she tells her story about finding a job in your profession in your new country.

Blue sky with the land of opportunity written across it

When people talk of “The land of opportunity”, they’re usually referring to a country in which they’ve travelled, immigrated or done business. People rarely refer to their own country in this way – and there’s a reason for that.

You arrive in a new country blissfully unaware of the usual limitations of your profession. You don’t know the history so you don’t have the intimidation factor. And when you don’t have the intimidation factor, it becomes easy to apply for that top position at that top company, to ring the most influential person in the industry and ask her for some career advice, to switch professions on a dime and act like you’ve been doing it all your life.

It takes guts to relocate to a new country. The major bonus though, is that you leave a lot of your fears behind and leave yourself free to take chances you wouldn’t normally take in your own country. There’s no one around to judge you if you fail, no one around to say, “No kidding! You’re applying for a job there? My cousin’s been trying to get a job there for years!”

I arrived in Australia with an impressive resume that unfortunately had zero correlation with what I actually wanted to do, which was write. In Canada I’d managed a small business, been director of an NGO, and even put in three years at law school. When an opportunity came up to do some writing part-time, I jumped on it. I wrote an outrageous letter, laid the whole situation on the table and voila! I became a writer.

Some key things worked in my favour. Being a foreigner, I had some skills none of the other applicants had: I spoke French, had worked in three different countries and had a certain liveliness that must have been contagious.

Equally important were the things I didn’t know about the job, namely that there were over a hundred other applicants, most of whom had PR backgrounds and at least two internships under their belt. That should’ve been obvious. In Canada, I’d have known that I wasn’t qualified and probably not bothered at all. But since I was away from home and living life large in a foreign country, I took a shot.

The real reason they gave me the job was because they liked my letter. My employer at the time was an open-minded guy looking for a great writer. Turned out that none of the other stuff really mattered as much as I’d have thought it did (if I’d thought it through – which I didn’t).

That first writing job spiralled into another job, which spiralled into another and another and eventually became a cosy career as a freelance writer. Back in Canada, I demanded the same fees I did in Australia, even though Canadian salaries are significantly lower and technically I should have corrected for that. But you know what? Nobody complained. Not one single person.

The moral of the story is that it can in fact be an advantage not to understand the culture of your profession in a foreign country. It helps you escape your fears. It motivates you to take chances. There’s no fear of judgement or rejection. You don’t know these people. Why not take a shot?

Amy Knapp is a freelance blogger for InsideTrak, where you can find free job postings from Australian employers.

 

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