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Archive for the ‘Emigration’ Category

Live, work and play like a Kiwi

New Zealand’s been said to be more like England than England. I think what they mean by that is that we look a bit like England from the outside, but then things look different once you’re in. With an egalitarian outlook, manners take a back seat to practicality. There’s less interest in the school you went to, and more interest in your taste in craft beer. As a small nation, we value people who can do stuff. Call it a meritocracy.

Perhaps the greatest expression of the Kiwi passion for a fair go is expressed in the relations between Maori and Pakeha (i.e. non Maori). Although no marriage is without conflict, most New Zealanders of all stripes are proud of their connection with Maori culture. Sure, everyone knows the haka (war dance) performed by the All Blacks. But anyone who’s ever been lucky enough to receive a formal Maori welcome knows that it’s a rich, noble culture with the greatest respect for the human character (and a famous sense of humour).

As the old Maori proverb goes: He aha te mea nui o te ao, he tangata, he tangata, he tangata.

Which means: What is the most important thing in the world? It is the people, it is the people, it is the people.

The work scene

New Zealand has a strong employment market. Compared to the OECD average, New Zealand performs well on all employment measures: unemployment (6%) is lower than the OECD average (7%). 75% of the total working age population is in employment, significantly better than the OECD average of 66%. Elsewhere, independent analyses predict unemployment to be as low as 4% by the beginning of 2017.

The sectors predicted to show the strongest growth this year include

  • Finance, insurance & real estate (21%)
  • Mining & construction (21%)
  • Transport & utilities (15%)
  • Services (14%)
  • Other growth categories include wholesale trade & retail, manufacturing, and public admin and education.

In short: New Zealand is a natural playground, the people are friendly, and the economy is well on track for sustainable growth. Click here to find the right visa so you can work, play and live like a local.

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The Best 3 Ways to Move to Canada

You’ve imagined tellng your current boss that you’re leaving for Canada. You’ve researched where you want to live. You’ve started the job search. But you’re still not sure how to actually make the move from the computer screen to Canada.

Sound familiar?

We’ve compiled our top three ways to make your move to Canada a reality this year.

canada lake

Work in an in-demand industry, and land a job before you go

An obvious start, but make sure you’ve researched what jobs are actually in demand in Canada. You’ll get extra points on your visa application if you have a qualifying job offer from a Canadian employer.

We’ve compiled a post about Canada’s latest skill shortages – check it out to see if your occupation is needed in Canada.

If your occupation is on there, start your job search. You can try Working In Canada’s job board which is frequently updated.

If your occupation isn’t on the list, there are other visa options available to you – see ‘Get clued up on Canadian visas’ below.

Meet Canadian employers face-to-face

Or, even better than a job board, you could visit the Working International Expo. This October we’re coming to London and Dublin (our boutique, Canada-only show) with Canadian employers recruiting for a range of job skills and industries.  Attending an expo is a great way to meet these Canadian employers face to face. You’ll get the opportunity to sell your skills and experience and you may even interview while you’re there.

consider a move outside the big cities

Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver are really popular with would-be Canadians, so think about making the move to some of the smaller provinces. The provinces experience critical skill shortages (meaning they’re more likely to look internationally for the skills they need) but still offer the incredible lifestyle and landscape of Canada’s major cities (arguably more so, as they’re less populated).

Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) operates currently in these provinces:

  • Alberta
  • Manitoba
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Yukon
  • British Columbia
  • New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia
  • Saskatchewan
  • Ontario

PNP applications are given preference over other skilled visa applications (like the Federal Skilled Worker stream) by Citizenship & Immigration Canada, as they look to find the skills the provinces really need.

Get clued up on Canadian visas

There are multiple visa options into Canada for skilled workers, entrepreneurs, business owners, students, family members, and more.

The best way to understand the different routes into Canada and the options available to you is to get specialist visa advice.  At the Working International Expo, we’ve got Canadian visa experts (like Brazolot Migration Group) on hand to guide you through your different options and the visa process.

You can also explore Citizenship & Immigration Canada’s website to determine your eligibility.

Show your commitment

Canadian employers want to see an understanding about what relocating to Canada will really mean to you – and they want to see your commitment to making your new life work.

Have you ever visited Canada?  Do you have family in Canada?  Will you be bringing all your family with you to Canada? Or will all of your family be back home? How will you adjust to your new life?  Are you in it for the long haul or will you turn around and head back home after only a few months?

Consider the above questions and be sure that a move to Canada is right for you.

…It is? Great, going to the Working International Expo is a good way to show your commitment and enthusiasm. You can research all your visa options, meet potential employers and sort your move – from arranging professional movers to opening a bank account.

Make the move to Canada this October

You can arrange your move to Canada this October without leaving the UK or Ireland. The Working International Expo is coming to London, Dublin (our boutique, one-day expo featuring Canadian employers only), and Manchester, starting in a fortnight!

See you there!

Aurora Borealis, Canada

Immigration news round-up – September 2015

As September slides around, it’s been a bit quiet on the visa news front from Australia, Canada and New Zealand. This is true for New Zealand especially – perhaps because the national focus is on that upcoming Rugby World Cup?

This month find out the financial benefits of moving to Australia for skilled workers; about two more visa schemes for Canada; and an upcoming snapshot of life for new Kiwis.

Australia

Moving to Australia pays off?

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has, for the first time, released some data on the personal income of Australian migrants. If you’re wondering about the financial implications of a move to Australia, have a look at some key figures:

  • The total income of migrant taxpayers in the 2009-10 financial year was $37.7 billion
  • Employee income contributed 92% to total income, of which $25.5 billion was reported by migrants from the skilled visa stream
  • Skilled visa holders’ average employee income was about $5,000 higher than the national average of $48,907 for all Australian taxpayers

So moving to Australia under the skilled visa stream means you could have an income higher than other Australian taxpayers.

Read all the data on the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ website, or start looking for that skilled job in Australia.

Canada

Quebec Immigration Investor Program reopens

If you’re keen on Canada, you’ll be pleased to hear that Quebec’s Immigration Investor Program has reopened. One of the world’s most popular immigrant investor programmes, this visa scheme allows qualified investors and their dependent family members the chance to gain Canadian permanent residency through investing CAD$800,000 risk-free, through an approved financial intermediary.

Applications opened on 31 August 2015 and will close 29 January 2016 – although it’s expected that the application quota of 1,750 will be reached before then.

Find out more about the requirements at Quebec’s official immigration website.

British Columbia needs skilled trade workers

Fort St John, in the north of the Canadian province of British Columbia, has recently announced the establishment of a pilot programme to bring in skilled international workers.

They are looking especially for skilled and experienced trade workers, such as electricians and welders.

No further details are available yet, but we’ll update you as soon as they become available.

New Zealand

Migrant Survey

Immigration New Zealand has begun the process of collecting data for its 2015 Migrant Survey. It’s an annual survey, sent out to a random sample of people who’ve been through New Zealand’s immigration process, that asks for feedback on topics including jobs, education background and levels of happiness.

Immigration New Zealand then takes on board the feedback to work out how new Kiwis settle into New Zealand and whether they can improve their services for future new migrants.

As the survey has just been sent out, we don’t have details of the results yet but it’s sure to be an interesting snapshot of life in New Zealand for new Kiwis. We’ll make sure we post the survey results when they’re released – if you haven’t already, sign up to our newsletter.  We’ll then email you this survey data when it’s available – easy!

Maid of the Mist VII, Niagara Falls

Canada’s Express Entry System Simplified

We really like this little infographic on Canada’s new Express Entry system.  It makes migrating to Canada look easy!

infographic-expressentry

It can be almost this easy – find your dream job with a little help from Working In Canada, and breeze through the immigration process with the help of one of our immigration experts (like Canada Immigration Partners).

Infographic supplied by Mathew & Miho at Canada Immigration Partners, Vancouver

Immigration News Roundup – July 2015

We keep a lookout for recent immigration changes in Australia, Canada and New Zealand so that you don’t have to. This month discover Australia’s migration trends over the past year, and see whether you’re in demand in South Australia.  Find out about two new Canadian immigration schemes, and see how a licensed immigration adviser can help with your New Zealand online visa application.

Australia

Australia’s Migration Trends 2013–2014

The Australian Department of Immigration and Border Protection has recently released a new report called Australia’s Migration Trends 2013–2014. Some of the key statistics from the report are that in the 2013–2014 programme year:

  • 207,947 permanent migration visas were granted – a decrease of 4.2 per cent on the previous year.
  • This included 190,000 places under Australia’s migration programme.
  • Of the migration programme’s 190,000 visas:
    • 128,550 visas (or 67.7 per cent) were granted through the skill stream.
    • 61,112 visas (or 32.2 per cent) were granted through the family stream.
    • 338 visas (or 0.2 per cent) were granted under the special eligibility visa category.
  • The place where most people moved from was India, with 39,026 places (that’s a 20.5 per cent share).
  • This was followed by the People’s Republic of China (26,776 places) and the UK (23,220 places).
  • Demand for the Temporary Work (Skilled) (subclass 457) visas decreased significantly. Grants for these visas fell 22.0 per cent which may be due to the government’s February 2014 review of the 457 process.

Check out the full report for further details.

Revised South Australia State Occupation List

On 1 July 2015, Immigration South Australia published a revised State Occupation List. Visit Immigration South Australia to view the new list. This list gives you an idea of what skills and jobs are in demand in South Australia. New English requirements for South Australia There have been some changes to the English requirements for some occupations on the South Australia State Occupation List including:

  • ICT occupations – Proficient English is required in each band score (or an overall score of Proficient Plus, i.e. IELTS 7.5 overall).
  • Engineering occupations – Competent Plus English (or an overall score of Proficient, i.e. IELTS 7 overall).

The State Occupation List contains the changes to the English requirements for other occupations.

Canada

Express Entry points requirement decreasing

The new Express Entry system for skilled migration to Canada involves creating a pool of potential applicants, who are invited to apply for a visa through a regular draw. Applicants are awarded points based on certain criteria, like their skills, experience, language capabilities, work history, etc. Two recent draws in June 2015 have seen the level of applicants’ points decreasing yet the number of invitations to apply for a visa increasing. This means meeting the requirements for skilled entry to Canada may be getting a little easier.

New immigration schemes for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia

Two eastern Canadian provinces, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, have recently announced new immigration schemes that are looking for skilled newcomers from overseas. The streams are aligned with the federal Express Entry systems. Although you don’t need a job offer from a Canadian employer to make an application, you must be eligible for either the:

Follow the links to find out more about the New Brunswick Express Entry Labour Market Stream or Nova Scotia Experience: Express Entry.

New Zealand

‘Apply on behalf’ now live

Immigration New Zealand has launched a new service called ‘Apply on Behalf’. This means that licensed immigration advisers and other people exempt from licensing, like lawyers, can now apply for visas online on your behalf. This means they can:

  • Start a new online application for a Student, Work or Visitor visa
  • Complete the application in much the same way as you can
  • View submitted applications and upload supporting documents

This means you could benefit from expert support when it comes to completing your visa application online – and it’s one less thing for you to do. Visa-and-Passport

Five Very Good Reasons to Move to Canada

Canada has 33 million inhabitants and is a world-class country that offers a vast array of scenic, cultural, and intellectual wonders. Even so, it regularly flies its maple leaf overseas to let the world know that it needs more skilled and experienced people to make it really hum.

So why would you pack your bag and make the move?

vancouver2

  1. Everyone wants to live there

If you move to Canada, you can live in one of the world’s most liveable cities. Three Canadian cities appear in The Telegraph’s list published last week: Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/property/pictures/9477990/The-worlds-10-best-cities-to-live-in.html?frame=2311063

  1. Job opportunities

Canada needs skilled people which means that there are many interesting and challenging job vacancies.  The Canadian jobless rate has been unchanged at 6.8 percent for the fourth consecutive month in May 2015. And in May 2015, the economy added 30,900 full-time jobs and 27,900 part-time jobs.

  1. Clean air, green surroundings

The air quality in Canada is amazing according to the World Health Organization which put forward a report on the global air quality. Despite being one of the largest countries in the world, Canada enjoys a very low population density. Huge tracts of land are covered by forests, and its population is largely concentrated towards the more temperate south of the country. Clean air is all you will breathe in their nation, which takes great pride in the preservation of its wildlife, and he enormous forests act as natural air filters. http://www.insidermonkey.com/blog/the-10-countries-with-the-cleanest-air-in-the-world-331264/#Cfe7gsc7dTQgfYPP.99

  1. Be part of huge scenery

Consider the Nahanni National Park Reserve which spans almost 12,000 square miles. At the 62nd parallel, it is the land of the midnight sun in Canada’s Northwest Territories. It covers the vast plains and limestone karst lands of the Ram Plateau in the Mackenzie Mountains. You can descend into Canada’s deepest ancient river canyons, reaching 3,000 feet, untouched since the last ice age.  (http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/canada/keith-bellows-favorite-canada-places/)

Nahanni National Park

5.  Canadians are really polite

Experience Canadian nice as soon as you reach customs: the US border guards are gruff and all business, the Canadians, by contrast, are unfailingly polite. The Canadian press is rife with examples of niceness in action. For instance, the National Post reports that when second-year law student Derek Murray left the headlights on all day Wednesday in his silver Acura, he returned to his parked car to find the battery drained and a note on his windshield. “I noticed you left your lights on,” the note said. “The battery will probably not have enough charge to start your vehicle. I left a blue extension cord on the fence and … a battery charger beside the fence in the cardboard box. If you know how to hook it up, use it to start your car.” The note went on to explain exactly how to jump-start the vehicle. “Good luck,” it said.  http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/edmonton-stranger-leaves-kind-note-and-battery-charger-for-student-who-forgot-to-turn-car-lights-off




Sounds amazing.

Working In can help you move there.

http://www.workingin-canada.com/

The Top 10 Best Reasons to Move to Australia (the June 2015 list)

Last week we posted some fantastic reasons why you should definitely move to New Zealand.  But if you have your heart set on moving to Australia, you’re in luck because we have written a Top 10 list for Australia as well!

So here’s our Top 10 Best Reasons to Move to Australia list – compiled by the staff here at Working In, especially for this blog.

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lifeguard

Reason #1 – Employment Prospects

Australia has good job prospects, over most industries.  Here’s a great place to start searching for your new job Down Under:  http://www.workingin-australia.com/jobs 

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CampingTips2-450x337

Reason #2 – Lifestyle

People living in Australia generally have a good work/life balance – that means more time for yourself, and more time with your family.  T

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generic beach AU Reason #3 – Climate

Australia’s climate has to be one of the best in the world.  Queensland is known as The Sunshine State because of its approx. 300 days of sunshine per year.

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multicultural australia Reason #4 – Society

You’ll find Australia is one of the most multicultural nations on Earth.

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Reason #5 – Nature

You can be close to water, the city and the bush in nearly every inhabited location in the country.

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Xmas AU Reason #6 – Opposite Seasons

You get to have Christmas on the Beach!  You don’t need snow to have Christmas .. it can be just as magical in the sunshine.

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bunyip

Reason #7 – Culture

Has some of the best slang words ever invented. Do you know what Ankle Biter, Rip Snorter, or Bunyip mean?*

(Don’t worry, we’ve given you the answers at the end of the blog post)

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melb Reason #8 – And more culture!

The food, wine and coffee are some of the best in the world. Australians really take pride in these – check out The Coffee Experience in Sydney this September, or why not take a Self-Guided Tour of the Barossa Valley?

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adventure collage 2Reason #9 – There are things to do

There are so many things to do in Australia – whether you like relaxing, adventure, or family fun, there’s something for everyone.

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tree

Reason #10 – Because you have always wanted to live and work in Australia..

..and why shouldn’t you?

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We hope our list helps you with your decision to move to Australia.

There will never be a ‘right time’ to move country, so don’t spend your life waiting for that moment to come along. Make it happen for yourself!

All the best,

Working In Team

* Wondering what those words mean?  Child / something fantastic / a mythical Outback creature

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