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Archive for the ‘New Zealand’ Category

Immigration News Roundup – July 2015

We keep a lookout for recent immigration changes in Australia, Canada and New Zealand so that you don’t have to. This month discover Australia’s migration trends over the past year, and see whether you’re in demand in South Australia.  Find out about two new Canadian immigration schemes, and see how a licensed immigration adviser can help with your New Zealand online visa application.

Australia

Australia’s Migration Trends 2013–2014

The Australian Department of Immigration and Border Protection has recently released a new report called Australia’s Migration Trends 2013–2014. Some of the key statistics from the report are that in the 2013–2014 programme year:

  • 207,947 permanent migration visas were granted – a decrease of 4.2 per cent on the previous year.
  • This included 190,000 places under Australia’s migration programme.
  • Of the migration programme’s 190,000 visas:
    • 128,550 visas (or 67.7 per cent) were granted through the skill stream.
    • 61,112 visas (or 32.2 per cent) were granted through the family stream.
    • 338 visas (or 0.2 per cent) were granted under the special eligibility visa category.
  • The place where most people moved from was India, with 39,026 places (that’s a 20.5 per cent share).
  • This was followed by the People’s Republic of China (26,776 places) and the UK (23,220 places).
  • Demand for the Temporary Work (Skilled) (subclass 457) visas decreased significantly. Grants for these visas fell 22.0 per cent which may be due to the government’s February 2014 review of the 457 process.

Check out the full report for further details.

Revised South Australia State Occupation List

On 1 July 2015, Immigration South Australia published a revised State Occupation List. Visit Immigration South Australia to view the new list. This list gives you an idea of what skills and jobs are in demand in South Australia. New English requirements for South Australia There have been some changes to the English requirements for some occupations on the South Australia State Occupation List including:

  • ICT occupations – Proficient English is required in each band score (or an overall score of Proficient Plus, i.e. IELTS 7.5 overall).
  • Engineering occupations – Competent Plus English (or an overall score of Proficient, i.e. IELTS 7 overall).

The State Occupation List contains the changes to the English requirements for other occupations.

Canada

Express Entry points requirement decreasing

The new Express Entry system for skilled migration to Canada involves creating a pool of potential applicants, who are invited to apply for a visa through a regular draw. Applicants are awarded points based on certain criteria, like their skills, experience, language capabilities, work history, etc. Two recent draws in June 2015 have seen the level of applicants’ points decreasing yet the number of invitations to apply for a visa increasing. This means meeting the requirements for skilled entry to Canada may be getting a little easier.

New immigration schemes for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia

Two eastern Canadian provinces, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, have recently announced new immigration schemes that are looking for skilled newcomers from overseas. The streams are aligned with the federal Express Entry systems. Although you don’t need a job offer from a Canadian employer to make an application, you must be eligible for either the:

Follow the links to find out more about the New Brunswick Express Entry Labour Market Stream or Nova Scotia Experience: Express Entry.

New Zealand

‘Apply on behalf’ now live

Immigration New Zealand has launched a new service called ‘Apply on Behalf’. This means that licensed immigration advisers and other people exempt from licensing, like lawyers, can now apply for visas online on your behalf. This means they can:

  • Start a new online application for a Student, Work or Visitor visa
  • Complete the application in much the same way as you can
  • View submitted applications and upload supporting documents

This means you could benefit from expert support when it comes to completing your visa application online – and it’s one less thing for you to do. Visa-and-Passport

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Seven things you’ll need when applying for an Australia, Canada or New Zealand visa

Australia, Canada and New Zealand have plenty of differences. From national pastimes (one loves cricket, another ice hockey) to national animals (one has moose and the other has kiwis). Or from temperature extremes (the bone chilling Canadian -63 degrees and the Australian sweltering 53 degrees) to local slang (don’t forget your bathers in Australia and to say “chur” in New Zealand).

But, when it comes to filling out your visa application, they do share some similarities.

Regardless of which country you want to move to – Australia, Canada or New Zealand – there are certain things you’ll need when it comes to applying for your visa:

  1. A valid passport

Let’s start with the obvious: you need to have a valid passport that’s not due to expire for at least six months.

You may be required to send your original passport with your application, or provide a certified copy. This means someone needs to witness your original documents and sign, stamp or endorse that the copies are true copies of the original documents. People who can certify copies must be authorised by law to take statutory declarations, like lawyers or court officials.

  1. Evidence of good character

Depending on the type of visa you are applying for, you may need to prove that you’re of good character. This may take the form of a list of questions that you need to tick ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to. These questions could include criminal convictions you may have or whether you’ve been involved in terrorist activities.

You’ll normally also need to provide a recent police certificate that shows whether you’ve got a criminal record.  The police certificate should be less than six months old for NZ visas; less than twelve months old for Australia visas; and for Canada visas the police certificate requirement is dependent on the type of visa you are applying for.

You’ll need to allow time for this process – UK police certificates can take up to 10 working days and also incur costs that you’re responsible for covering.   In the UK, police certificates are handled by ACRO.

  1. Acceptable standard of health

You will need to prove that you have an acceptable standard of health – each country has different definitions of what this means.

Depending on which visa type you’re going for, you may also need to undertake medical tests. This is compulsory if you’re applying for permanent visas, but may also apply for some temporary visas too. These thorough medical checks may include:

  • X-rays
  • Full blood tests
  • Urine tests
  • Full family history

The medicals can only be performed by approved doctors, and when you provide results they should be as recent as possible. These tests can take time – not only in booking an appointment, but waiting for your results. They also cost money which you’ll need to pay.

  1. Recent passport photos

For New Zealand and Canada visas, you’ll need to supply some recent passport photos with your application. They’ll need to comply with certain regulations, like size, background colour, and what you’re allowed to wear or not.

They may also need to be signed as a true likeness by a witness.

Recent passport photos are not required for Australia visa applications.

  1. Specific policy requirements

There are plenty of different visa types for each country. However, regardless of the visa you apply for, there will be specific requirements you should be aware of. They could include having:

  • A valid job offer
  • Certain qualifications (which you’ll need to prove through university transcripts and school certificates)
  • A certain amount of savings
  • Key skills
  • Family or partner sponsorship
  1. Money for the fees

Whichever country and visa you apply for, there will be fees which you’ll need to pay. For an idea of costs, check out:

  1. Patience

Most of all, you’re going to need patience. Applying for a visa can be a lengthy, and at times frustrating, process.

Keep reminding yourself why you’re doing this and hang in there.

Where to go for help

To help you through the visa processes, there are plenty of places you can go.

Each country’s immigration website

Australia, Canada and New Zealand all have very comprehensive websites full of information about the different types of visas they offer, plus the processes involved:

Migration experts

There are many migration experts who can share their experience and expertise to help you get a visa. If you’re considering living and working in Australia or New Zealand, Migration Planners could help.

Additionally, as of June 2015, licensed immigration advisers in New Zealand can now apply online on your behalf for certain types of visas. Using an online system could help to speed up the visa process. It also means it’s one less thing for you to worry about as the experts will handle your application for you.

If you are considering moving to Canada and want expert migration advice, see our list of Canadian preferred partners on our website.

Are you thinking about making the move?

Share any concerns or questions you may have by commenting below – we’ll see if we can help.

The Power of Working In

We came across a wonderful story of a Brit who emigrated to NZ a few years ago.  We don’t think he attended any of our expos, but just wanted to share to remind everyone that change is possible!

*****

“We have been here over eight years and I love this country.

It’s beautiful, our lives are so completely different to what I had experienced in the UK:  I am my own boss, we have children here now, I make my own award winning wine, my wife gets paid to work with horses (her absolute dream job), we often barter for produce, our kids go bare foot in school, I fish and dive, you can ski an hour’s drive away, you can have a whole beach to yourself, I get to have a BBQ on Christmas day, teenagers say good morning to me, business is done on a hand shake, we have friends from many different nationalities, my eldest came home and did a haka last week, the stars at night always amaze me, there is always a new playground to explore, we have a world class trout river a kilometer away, our small and modest home is the best I ever owned, I feel like a rich man in everything except money.”

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Our Brand New Top 5 Reasons to Move to New Zealand

Young Girl on Rope Swing under Pohutukawa Tree, Whangapoua Beach, Coromandel, North Island, New Zealand

Whangapoua Beach, Coromandel, New Zealand

After a quick break from blogging, it’s really good to be back.  We’re sure our blog will be just as informative, inspirational, and educational as it ever was!

To kick things off again, today we’re sharing our Top 5 Reasons to Move to New Zealand.  As the Working In office is in Auckland, New Zealand, it’s a location that we know pretty well.  It’s not a fluffy, feel-good Top 5 list (we’ll do one of those next week though!) – it’s a solid, sensible set of reasons to move here, that may influence you if you are seriously considering moving country.

  1. The New Zealand economy is strong post-recession, with solid domestic consumption demand coupled with low inflation, and a low unemployment rate of 5.7%.
  1. NZ has 10% more land mass than the UK – but the population hasn’t even hit 4.5 million yet. That’s a lot more space for you, and your children, to make the most of.
  1. In 2014, New Zealand was ranked by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the #1 place in the world to raise children. 
  1. NZ has one of the lowest personal tax rates in the world, with 70% of its residents on a 19.5% tax rate. Also, the GST is 15%, compared to 20% VAT in the UK, and 23% in Ireland.
  1. Kiwis are renowned for being laid back, chilled out people – which reflects the relaxed lifestyle people in New Zealand enjoy!

Just five reasons why we love living here!  We do hope to see you over here at some point soon.

All the Best,

Working In Team

Sources:  Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment (New Zealand), Lonely Planet, Emigration Group (UK)

5 reasons to make the move now

If you subscribed to our email newsletter, chances are you’re seriously considering packing up your life and moving, working, living and playing in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

But you haven’t done it quite yet.

So this month, we’re telling you why you need to make the move – now.

1. Winter is coming

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If you’re in the northern hemisphere, winter is coming. Unlike Game of Thrones, it doesn’t mean murder, mayhem and naughty stuff but, as a lot of Working Inners can attest to (being British expats ourselves), winter isn’t a desperately fun time. Short days, an abundance of darkness, and bad weather inevitably leads to a six-month long hibernation. Not fun. However over in Australia, Canada and New Zealand…

2. An enviable lifestyle

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As spring blooms in the southern hemisphere, its enviable lifestyle comes to the fore. Now, for the next six months, Aussies and Kiwis are making the most of the long, hot, sunny days – whether that’s surfing, hiking, BBQ-ing, beaching, ocean swimming… the list goes on. It may also be coming into winter in Canada, but Canada does winter really well. With its blankets of snow, it’s a winter wonderland – no more hopping on a plane to reach the slopes for skiing and snowboarding, it’s on your doorstep. If you’ve ever wanted the picture perfect Christmas day, now’s the time to get over to Canada.

3. The opportunities are booming

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New Zealand came through the global financial crisis pretty unscathed, reflected in its “rock star” economy. Now there are plenty of exciting opportunities abounding – from helping to rebuild Christchurch, to citywide rail electrification projects, and multi-million dollar infrastructure investment. Australia is continuing to climb out of its downturn and more and more jobs are coming to the market, while Canada’s economy remains strong and, more importantly, continues to grow.

4. Chart-topping success

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Every single year, scores of surveys are released – the world’s best cities, the happiest places to live, the world’s best countries… and every single year, Australia, Canada and New Zealand feature highly. This is especially true for Canada – it’s got one of the world’s best reputation’s internationally [see page 17] as a place to do business and live, with Australia and New Zealand not far behind. The countries’ cities rank highly for liveability (8 out of 10 cities in the 2014 Economist Intelligence Unit’s world’s most liveable cities were in Australia, Canada and New Zealand). All three countries feature highly in the latest world happiness report. Whereas British expats reckon they’re healthiest and wealthiest in… yep, you’ve guessed it. Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Go on, you deserve to be happy and wealthy too – make the move.

5. It’s never a good time

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So why move now, rather than next year or beyond? Because, frankly, it’s never a good time to move – you’ll always be waiting for your cousin’s wedding or for your little one to start school. Like having a baby, there is never an ideal time to move country.

So you might as well to do it now.

Convinced? Start searching for your new job and life in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

Fight or flight: what to expect when you arrive in a new country

You’ve been excitedly planning your move for months but now you’ve landed and you’re not feeling so sure. Don’t worry – these feelings are absolutely normal and part of what’s known as the settlement curve.

In fact, there are six distinct stages most people go through as they settle in a new country – here’s what to expect over your first 18 months to two years.

The settlement curve

 

Diagram source: Immigration New Zealand Settlement Services.

Stage one: forethought

This stage is all about the excitement of planning with lots of positivity about your move to your new country. It’s important to have realistic expectations about your new home country, however, so now’s the time to look into jobs, get an idea of cost of living and research where you’re going to settle.

Stage two: fun

You’ve arrived and it’s brilliant fun. New people, new places and new experiences mean you’re feeling really positive about your new home.

Stage three: fright

Uh-oh. Something’s happened. It might be something major (a family member has fallen ill) or something small (you’re stuck in traffic for the fifth day in a row) – whatever it is, it’ll make you feel frustrated which in turn makes you feel unhappy.

Stage four: flight

Ok, something has happened – and you don’t have a strong network of friends or family to call on yet in your new home country. This is the point that you may decide to move on or return to your country of origin.

Stage five: fight

Time to embrace your inner Rocky. This is your turning point – you become realistic about what it’s like to live in your new country and make a conscious decision to stay and build your life here.

Stage six: fit

Welcome to everyday life. By this stage, your challenges are more about the usual day to day stuff people think about, rather than being about living in a new country. You’ve now decided to stay which helps you to feel like you ‘fit’ in. Congratulations – you’ve made it!

Dealing with the six stages

First off, remember that everyone who has ever been in your position will have experienced these emotions at some point. Understand that it’s completely normal and natural and try some of these tips to help you deal with your emotions:

  • Keep talking – to your other half, your family or your employer. Sharing your fears will help you deal with them.
  • Get out and about – the couch may be calling but that’s not going to help you feel more settled. Go for a walk, get some fresh air, make the most of that new lifestyle you were after. Remind yourself why you wanted to move.
  • Get involved – join your colleagues at the next social gathering, sign up to a gym, research local clubs – anything that gets you mingling with people and involved with your new life. Say yes to every offer that comes your way.
  • Research settlement services – there’s organisations dedicated to helping new migrants feel happy in their new homes. Check out Settlement Support New Zealand, find settlement services in Australia or search for immigration services in Canada.

Have you made the move? Did you experience a rollercoaster journey through the settlement curve? What helped you?

Latest skill shortages in New Zealand

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHays quarterly report has highlighted the occupations that are most in demand in New Zealand. The most recent report, covering April – June 2013, shows that tradesmen continue to be needed as the Christchurch rebuild picks up pace and other professions joining the demand include accountancy and IT professionals.

New Zealand is on the hunt for skilled, experienced professionals with at least a few years’ work experience under their belts (rather than recent graduates or students) in the following areas:

Accountancy and finance – commerce and industry

  • Senior Payroll Consultants/Payroll Managers
  • Payroll Officers
  • Credit Control – candidates with the proven ability to maintain a strong relationship with a client or a customer whilst successfully collecting monies owed are in constant demand.
  • Accounts Payable – there’s a high demand for skilled and experienced Accounts Payable Processors, in particular in temporary and contract positions, as organisations look to maintain their invoice processing.
  • Assistant Accountants
  • Financial Analysts
  • Company Accountants – candidates who have a large scope of skills and abilities and who can take on varied roles are in demand as more companies restructure or absorb roles.
  • Financial Accountants – technical candidates, who can work through year end and month end, especially at this time of year, are in high demand.
  • Manufacturing Accountants – there is a high demand for skills in the manufacturing sector. Because it is such a specialist industry, the background in this sector is essential for most candidates. Therefore, there is a shortage of candidates in this area.
  • Auditors (Professional Practice) – these candidates are always going overseas or joining the commercial realm, which is creating a shortage in this space.
  • Internal Audit – this is notoriously a high-demand area as these candidates require a very “different” blend of skills.

Accountancy and finance – professional practice

  • Business Advisory Services Intermediates – in demand at all intermediate, senior and manager levels.
  • Manager and Senior – as corporate businesses start ramping up due to the Christchurch rebuild they are asking for more advisory services, for example, cash flow forecasting, tax advice, financial modelling, and it’s the Senior and Managers that can provide this advice.
  • Intermediates – with the Seniors and Managers time being absorbed in doing more ‘advisory’ work there is demand for Intermediate Accountants to do more compliance work.
  • BAS – demand is particularly high for candidates from big firms as they have big client experience.
  • Audit
  • Tax – many candidates leave tax before reaching Manager or Assistant Manager level, leaving this area candidate short at the upper levels.

Architecture

  • Architectural Technicians (2+ years) (ArchiCAD)
  • Project Architects (10+ years)
  • Architectural Technicians (2+ years) Revit

Construction

  • Quantity Surveyors
  • Estimators
  • Civil Site Engineers
  • Intermediate Quantity Surveyors
  • Supervisors and Engineers – particularly for those supervisors and engineers with tunnelling experience demand is high, as is being experienced globally.
  • UFB Supervisors – the UFB rollout across the country has seen high demand supervisors capable of managing multiple crews across multiple locations.

Energy

  • Glove and Barrier Line Mechanics
  • Cable Jointers – due to this trade recently becoming a stand-alone skilled profession in New Zealand the industry has a shortfall of experienced 33kv and above Cable Jointers on the distribution and transmission network.
  • Protection Technicians
  • Lines
  • Substation Engineers – Substation Engineers with local network experience and an understanding of industry standards and regulations are in demand.

Engineering

  • Structural Engineering – these candidates continue to be in demand from mature graduate to senior level. The high level of building assessments and strengthening projects taking place nationally, Christchurch rebuild and ongoing local refurbishment and new build project work across the country has created an even bigger shortage for Structural Engineers. Engineering Consultancies are requesting BEng qualified, preferable within New Zealand based on NZ design codes and local Seismic design awareness is preferred with CPEng qualified being very desirable to sign off on projects.
  • Civil Engineering Design (Transport, Water & Infrastructure) – Civil Engineers with five-plus years experience in design and project management are always in demand.
  • Geotechnical Engineers – Geotechnical Engineers with NZ bachelor degrees and anything from three years experience are always in demand in Wellington. A particular demand for senior Geotechnical engineers with 10+ years experience and NZ CPEng has been seen over the last year, as these are the rarest in the market and almost every consultancy in NZ would be interested in interviewing this type of candidate.
  • Land Surveyors

IT

  • Senior Network Engineer
  • Senior Systems Engineer – a high volume of project-based work lasting between 12-18 months is driving the demand for Senior System Engineer willing to take on contract employment.
  • Database Administrator – particularly within SQL, Database Administrators are in short supply. Solid ETL and report/cube building skills (SSIS, SSRS and SSAS) are in highest demand.
  • SharePoint Developer

Insurance

  • Brokers – these candidates are in demand within the F&G commercial space at the intermediate, senior and management levels across the country both in major cities and in regional areas.
  • Underwriters – there is some recruitment in the F&G space both in regional and main cities as candidates relocate and employers backfill vacancies where staff have moved on.
  • Loss Adjustors and Worker Compensation Officers – Australian companies are advertising in New Zealand for Loss Adjustors, Worker Compensation Officers and Underwriters as they endeavour to attract candidates with excellent training and work ethic, creating a shortage in New Zealand.

Legal

  • Senior Lawyers – candidates with major firm experience who offer a transferable client base are in demand as firms seek to develop their practices again after a holding pattern.
  • Senior Commercial, Property and General Practitioners – candidates with small to medium-sized firm experience are sought.
  • Commercial Solicitors – with solicitors preferring big firm experience or usually working for the larger regional firms there is a shortage of candidates in the commercial space.
  • Banking and Finance Solicitors – employers are in particular looking for candidates with major firm experience.

Property

  • Building Surveyors – with a large volume of continuing work in Christchurch and across the country, demand for skilled Building Surveyors with local experience is high.
  • Quantity Surveyors – similar to the market for Building Surveyors, Quantity Surveyors with local experience are in high demand with the large volumes of work taking place in Christchurch.
  • Intermediate Property Managers

Sales and marketing

  • Category Management, Market Research and Technical Sales
  • Business Development Managers and Sales Managers
  • Digital Marketers, PR and Communications – employers are favouring commercially-orientated candidates, as marketing budgets increase along with the need to demonstrate a measurable return on investment. Capable Digital Marketers are in demand on both the client and agency side.

Trades and labour

  • Excavator Operators/Drain Layers/Asphalt Layers/Drivers – Christchurch
  • Carpenter/Painter/Plasterer/Tiler/Scaffolder – Christchurch

Got the skills and experience New Zealand needs?

Head to Working In New Zealand to search for jobs and employers currently looking overseas to recruit.

Please note: this is intended as a general guide to skill shortages currently being felt throughout New Zealand and do not represent specific job vacancies specifically suitable for overseas candidates.

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