Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘Emigration’

The Top 10 Best Reasons to Move to Australia (the June 2015 list)

Last week we posted some fantastic reasons why you should definitely move to New Zealand.  But if you have your heart set on moving to Australia, you’re in luck because we have written a Top 10 list for Australia as well!

So here’s our Top 10 Best Reasons to Move to Australia list – compiled by the staff here at Working In, especially for this blog.

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Reason #1 – Employment Prospects

Australia has good job prospects, over most industries.  Here’s a great place to start searching for your new job Down Under:  http://www.workingin-australia.com/jobs 

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Reason #2 – Lifestyle

People living in Australia generally have a good work/life balance – that means more time for yourself, and more time with your family.  T

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generic beach AU Reason #3 – Climate

Australia’s climate has to be one of the best in the world.  Queensland is known as The Sunshine State because of its approx. 300 days of sunshine per year.

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multicultural australia Reason #4 – Society

You’ll find Australia is one of the most multicultural nations on Earth.

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Reason #5 – Nature

You can be close to water, the city and the bush in nearly every inhabited location in the country.

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Xmas AU Reason #6 – Opposite Seasons

You get to have Christmas on the Beach!  You don’t need snow to have Christmas .. it can be just as magical in the sunshine.

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Reason #7 – Culture

Has some of the best slang words ever invented. Do you know what Ankle Biter, Rip Snorter, or Bunyip mean?*

(Don’t worry, we’ve given you the answers at the end of the blog post)

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melb Reason #8 – And more culture!

The food, wine and coffee are some of the best in the world. Australians really take pride in these – check out The Coffee Experience in Sydney this September, or why not take a Self-Guided Tour of the Barossa Valley?

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adventure collage 2Reason #9 – There are things to do

There are so many things to do in Australia – whether you like relaxing, adventure, or family fun, there’s something for everyone.

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Reason #10 – Because you have always wanted to live and work in Australia..

..and why shouldn’t you?

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We hope our list helps you with your decision to move to Australia.

There will never be a ‘right time’ to move country, so don’t spend your life waiting for that moment to come along. Make it happen for yourself!

All the best,

Working In Team

* Wondering what those words mean?  Child / something fantastic / a mythical Outback creature

5 reasons to make the move now

If you subscribed to our email newsletter, chances are you’re seriously considering packing up your life and moving, working, living and playing in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

But you haven’t done it quite yet.

So this month, we’re telling you why you need to make the move – now.

1. Winter is coming

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If you’re in the northern hemisphere, winter is coming. Unlike Game of Thrones, it doesn’t mean murder, mayhem and naughty stuff but, as a lot of Working Inners can attest to (being British expats ourselves), winter isn’t a desperately fun time. Short days, an abundance of darkness, and bad weather inevitably leads to a six-month long hibernation. Not fun. However over in Australia, Canada and New Zealand…

2. An enviable lifestyle

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As spring blooms in the southern hemisphere, its enviable lifestyle comes to the fore. Now, for the next six months, Aussies and Kiwis are making the most of the long, hot, sunny days – whether that’s surfing, hiking, BBQ-ing, beaching, ocean swimming… the list goes on. It may also be coming into winter in Canada, but Canada does winter really well. With its blankets of snow, it’s a winter wonderland – no more hopping on a plane to reach the slopes for skiing and snowboarding, it’s on your doorstep. If you’ve ever wanted the picture perfect Christmas day, now’s the time to get over to Canada.

3. The opportunities are booming

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New Zealand came through the global financial crisis pretty unscathed, reflected in its “rock star” economy. Now there are plenty of exciting opportunities abounding – from helping to rebuild Christchurch, to citywide rail electrification projects, and multi-million dollar infrastructure investment. Australia is continuing to climb out of its downturn and more and more jobs are coming to the market, while Canada’s economy remains strong and, more importantly, continues to grow.

4. Chart-topping success

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Every single year, scores of surveys are released – the world’s best cities, the happiest places to live, the world’s best countries… and every single year, Australia, Canada and New Zealand feature highly. This is especially true for Canada – it’s got one of the world’s best reputation’s internationally [see page 17] as a place to do business and live, with Australia and New Zealand not far behind. The countries’ cities rank highly for liveability (8 out of 10 cities in the 2014 Economist Intelligence Unit’s world’s most liveable cities were in Australia, Canada and New Zealand). All three countries feature highly in the latest world happiness report. Whereas British expats reckon they’re healthiest and wealthiest in… yep, you’ve guessed it. Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Go on, you deserve to be happy and wealthy too – make the move.

5. It’s never a good time

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So why move now, rather than next year or beyond? Because, frankly, it’s never a good time to move – you’ll always be waiting for your cousin’s wedding or for your little one to start school. Like having a baby, there is never an ideal time to move country.

So you might as well to do it now.

Convinced? Start searching for your new job and life in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

Fight or flight: what to expect when you arrive in a new country

You’ve been excitedly planning your move for months but now you’ve landed and you’re not feeling so sure. Don’t worry – these feelings are absolutely normal and part of what’s known as the settlement curve.

In fact, there are six distinct stages most people go through as they settle in a new country – here’s what to expect over your first 18 months to two years.

The settlement curve

 

Diagram source: Immigration New Zealand Settlement Services.

Stage one: forethought

This stage is all about the excitement of planning with lots of positivity about your move to your new country. It’s important to have realistic expectations about your new home country, however, so now’s the time to look into jobs, get an idea of cost of living and research where you’re going to settle.

Stage two: fun

You’ve arrived and it’s brilliant fun. New people, new places and new experiences mean you’re feeling really positive about your new home.

Stage three: fright

Uh-oh. Something’s happened. It might be something major (a family member has fallen ill) or something small (you’re stuck in traffic for the fifth day in a row) – whatever it is, it’ll make you feel frustrated which in turn makes you feel unhappy.

Stage four: flight

Ok, something has happened – and you don’t have a strong network of friends or family to call on yet in your new home country. This is the point that you may decide to move on or return to your country of origin.

Stage five: fight

Time to embrace your inner Rocky. This is your turning point – you become realistic about what it’s like to live in your new country and make a conscious decision to stay and build your life here.

Stage six: fit

Welcome to everyday life. By this stage, your challenges are more about the usual day to day stuff people think about, rather than being about living in a new country. You’ve now decided to stay which helps you to feel like you ‘fit’ in. Congratulations – you’ve made it!

Dealing with the six stages

First off, remember that everyone who has ever been in your position will have experienced these emotions at some point. Understand that it’s completely normal and natural and try some of these tips to help you deal with your emotions:

  • Keep talking – to your other half, your family or your employer. Sharing your fears will help you deal with them.
  • Get out and about – the couch may be calling but that’s not going to help you feel more settled. Go for a walk, get some fresh air, make the most of that new lifestyle you were after. Remind yourself why you wanted to move.
  • Get involved – join your colleagues at the next social gathering, sign up to a gym, research local clubs – anything that gets you mingling with people and involved with your new life. Say yes to every offer that comes your way.
  • Research settlement services – there’s organisations dedicated to helping new migrants feel happy in their new homes. Check out Settlement Support New Zealand, find settlement services in Australia or search for immigration services in Canada.

Have you made the move? Did you experience a rollercoaster journey through the settlement curve? What helped you?

Live in New Zealand: you want to break free?

Our Marketing Manager Julie waxes lyrical about the lifestyle in New Zealand – including award-winning wines, delicious antipasto platters and spectacular scenic drives. Be warned: you may want to pack up your bags and hop on the next plane when you get to the end of this.

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In the words of the immortal Freddy Mercury, the scope to do just that in NZ is truly endless. In fact, on your doorstep is sea, sun, sand, bungy jumping, skiing and boating to name just a few.

On that very note I would like (or should I say love) to share an experience with you that whilst not energetic, was incredibly pleasant and satisfying. To set the scene, it’s mid-Sunday morning, the sun is shining so brightly against the azure blue sky, and the ocean is sparkling too. Oh yes, you get to see serious peeks of the pacific ocean throughout the drive to this destination.

Sidebar: one tends to get an ocean vista regularly living on the Auckland Isthmus.

Back to the story, the car journey is leisurely, about a 50-minute drive heading north from central Auckland. Taking you over the harbour bridge (a bungy jumper or bridge walker’s dream), along state highway one, then through the new shortish tunnel. Upon reaching the picturesque town of Warkworth there is sign post pointing to Snells Beach a short 10-minute drive landing us firmly in this amazing place called Brick Bay which is a wee cove that falls away from the main Snells Beach Road. Then winding your way down to the amazing destination known as the Brick Bay Vineyard.

To complete the scene and decadence too, imagine this, you’re sitting in a lovely airy pavilion surrounded by original sculptures overlooking a duck pond with glass of BBV’s very best in hand plus a delicious antipasto platter …. total bliss! You can tell that I am going to highly recommend this amazing spot, plus endorse the many more award-winning vineyards upon which NZ’s wine making reputation is built.

Above is a wee peek of just one of the many fabulous sculptures at BBV that can be spotted as you drive in – Rugby World Cup sheep! A very special creation for this major sporting event.

If that’s whet your appetite, see more at Brick Bay Wines website.

Dads down under & other differences between the UK, NZ, Oz & Canada

This weekend, dads around New Zealand and Australia are preparing to be spoilt – Kiwis and Aussies celebrate Father’s Day on the first Sunday in September (might be a bit of a problem if your UK-based dad is used to getting Father’s Day love on the third Sunday in June).

So, what other things might you have to get used to if you swap a home in the UK for life in New Zealand, Australia and Canada?

Public holidays

You can wave goodbye to your UK spring and summer bank holidays – but move to New Zealand and you gain Waitangi Day, Anzac Day and Labour Day while certain areas of Australia enjoy Labour Day and Melbourne Cup Day too. Not forgetting that New Zealand and Australia are patriotic too – they even get Queen’s Birthday as a public holiday. Canada doesn’t do badly either with Canada Day, Labour Day and Thanksgiving Day.

‘isms’

By that we mean the little dialect differences between the countries. In the UK and Canada, every summer you drag out your flip-flops. In Australia, it’s your thongs (conjuring up all kinds of potentially embarrassing situations) and in NZ it’s your jandals. Should someone compliment you on your pants in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, they haven’t suddenly developed x-ray vision and you haven’t had an acute attack of forgetfulness – that’s their equivalent of trousers. While we’re on it, pack your gum boots for life down under (Wellington boots) and your runners for Canada (trainers). A pair of orange flip flops stuck into a beach

The seasons

Luckily, Canada’s in the northern hemisphere too so it’s easy to adjust to summer in June-August and winter in November-February. However, head down under and prepare to get Christmas on the beach and when you’d traditionally be enjoying some summer sunshine in the UK, to be embracing winter sports in Australia and New Zealand instead.

Time difference – or how not to annoy your mum

Judging by the phone in your pocket, bag or lovingly placed on the table in-front of you, you like to be connected. But catching your first midday wave in Oz or trying your first eggs bene brekkie in NZ is not the time to call your nearest and dearest back in the UK – unless you fancy rousing them from their slumber that is. However, if you come across your first moose in Canada you don’t have to wait too long to let your mum know – it’s only a four or five hour time difference.

Over to you

If you moved overseas, what do you reckon you’d miss most about home?

Canadian cities in world domination

Girl jumping with the Canadian flag against backdrop of blue skyNot only does it have Mounties, maple syrup and free-roaming bears, Canada’s now got another reason to be smug – three of its cities make up the world’s top five most liveable cities.

Dominating the top of The Economist magazine’s 2012 list were Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary. The survey ranks 140 cities based on a number of important factors, like health care, stability, culture and environment, education and infrastructure. The maximum score a city could receive was 100.

So how did Canada fare?

Well, Vancouver was the highest-ranked Canadian city, taking the third spot with a score of 97.3. Close on its heels was Toronto in fourth with a score of 97.2, followed up by Calgary in fifth place (tied with Adelaide in Australia) with 96.6.

With its reputation for an outdoorsy lifestyle, welcoming and friendly people and jaw-dropping natural landscape, it’s not really surprising Canada can compete on a global scale.

The full list

According to The Economist, the top 10 most liveable cities 2012 are:
1. Melbourne, Australia
2. Vienna, Austria
3. Vancouver
4. Toronto
5. (tie) Calgary and Adelaide, Australia
7. Sydney, Australia
8. Helsinki, Finland
9. Perth, Australia
10. Auckland, New Zealand

Over to you

What do you think – do you agree with this list? Are there cities you think should be in the top 10?

What is FIFO?

Fly in Fly Out – or FIFO as it is more commonly referred to – is a method of employing people for remote country locations which is very commonly used in Western Australia. As an alternative to relocating entire families to often remote locations, the employee is flown to the work site for a number of days, and then flown home again.

Why FIFO?

Employers prefer their workers to be FIFO as the cost of transporting employees to site is far less than it would be to build, maintain and develop long term communities. Employees may prefer the FIFO opportunity as their families are often reluctant to relocate to small towns in remote areas.

What should I expect?

Mine Workers in Bengalla

Mine Workers in Australia

Rosters dictate how long you are on site, and how long you are home. Most rosters offered are 4 weeks on site and 1 week at home – 4:1 however these rosters vary depending on the project and the site.

Usually a FIFO position involves working a shift of 10 hours each day for a number of continuous days. When on site, you will be supplied with all meals, accommodation, house-keeping – some camps also offer swimming pools, tennis courts, gyms, cable TV and unlimited internet as a way of attracting and retaining skilled staff.

Read on for more on what’s driving the industry here in Australia and how you can get your FIFO job:

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