Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘Emigration’

The Top 10 Best Reasons to Move to Australia (the June 2015 list)

Last week we posted some fantastic reasons why you should definitely move to New Zealand.  But if you have your heart set on moving to Australia, you’re in luck because we have written a Top 10 list for Australia as well!

So here’s our Top 10 Best Reasons to Move to Australia list – compiled by the staff here at Working In, especially for this blog.

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Reason #1 – Employment Prospects

Australia has good job prospects, over most industries.  Here’s a great place to start searching for your new job Down Under:  http://www.workingin-australia.com/jobs 

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Reason #2 – Lifestyle

People living in Australia generally have a good work/life balance – that means more time for yourself, and more time with your family.  T

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generic beach AU Reason #3 – Climate

Australia’s climate has to be one of the best in the world.  Queensland is known as The Sunshine State because of its approx. 300 days of sunshine per year.

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multicultural australia Reason #4 – Society

You’ll find Australia is one of the most multicultural nations on Earth.

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Reason #5 – Nature

You can be close to water, the city and the bush in nearly every inhabited location in the country.

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Xmas AU Reason #6 – Opposite Seasons

You get to have Christmas on the Beach!  You don’t need snow to have Christmas .. it can be just as magical in the sunshine.

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bunyip

Reason #7 – Culture

Has some of the best slang words ever invented. Do you know what Ankle Biter, Rip Snorter, or Bunyip mean?*

(Don’t worry, we’ve given you the answers at the end of the blog post)

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melb Reason #8 – And more culture!

The food, wine and coffee are some of the best in the world. Australians really take pride in these – check out The Coffee Experience in Sydney this September, or why not take a Self-Guided Tour of the Barossa Valley?

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adventure collage 2Reason #9 – There are things to do

There are so many things to do in Australia – whether you like relaxing, adventure, or family fun, there’s something for everyone.

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tree

Reason #10 – Because you have always wanted to live and work in Australia..

..and why shouldn’t you?

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We hope our list helps you with your decision to move to Australia.

There will never be a ‘right time’ to move country, so don’t spend your life waiting for that moment to come along. Make it happen for yourself!

All the best,

Working In Team

* Wondering what those words mean?  Child / something fantastic / a mythical Outback creature

5 reasons to make the move now

If you subscribed to our email newsletter, chances are you’re seriously considering packing up your life and moving, working, living and playing in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

But you haven’t done it quite yet.

So this month, we’re telling you why you need to make the move – now.

1. Winter is coming

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If you’re in the northern hemisphere, winter is coming. Unlike Game of Thrones, it doesn’t mean murder, mayhem and naughty stuff but, as a lot of Working Inners can attest to (being British expats ourselves), winter isn’t a desperately fun time. Short days, an abundance of darkness, and bad weather inevitably leads to a six-month long hibernation. Not fun. However over in Australia, Canada and New Zealand…

2. An enviable lifestyle

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As spring blooms in the southern hemisphere, its enviable lifestyle comes to the fore. Now, for the next six months, Aussies and Kiwis are making the most of the long, hot, sunny days – whether that’s surfing, hiking, BBQ-ing, beaching, ocean swimming… the list goes on. It may also be coming into winter in Canada, but Canada does winter really well. With its blankets of snow, it’s a winter wonderland – no more hopping on a plane to reach the slopes for skiing and snowboarding, it’s on your doorstep. If you’ve ever wanted the picture perfect Christmas day, now’s the time to get over to Canada.

3. The opportunities are booming

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New Zealand came through the global financial crisis pretty unscathed, reflected in its “rock star” economy. Now there are plenty of exciting opportunities abounding – from helping to rebuild Christchurch, to citywide rail electrification projects, and multi-million dollar infrastructure investment. Australia is continuing to climb out of its downturn and more and more jobs are coming to the market, while Canada’s economy remains strong and, more importantly, continues to grow.

4. Chart-topping success

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Every single year, scores of surveys are released – the world’s best cities, the happiest places to live, the world’s best countries… and every single year, Australia, Canada and New Zealand feature highly. This is especially true for Canada – it’s got one of the world’s best reputation’s internationally [see page 17] as a place to do business and live, with Australia and New Zealand not far behind. The countries’ cities rank highly for liveability (8 out of 10 cities in the 2014 Economist Intelligence Unit’s world’s most liveable cities were in Australia, Canada and New Zealand). All three countries feature highly in the latest world happiness report. Whereas British expats reckon they’re healthiest and wealthiest in… yep, you’ve guessed it. Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Go on, you deserve to be happy and wealthy too – make the move.

5. It’s never a good time

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So why move now, rather than next year or beyond? Because, frankly, it’s never a good time to move – you’ll always be waiting for your cousin’s wedding or for your little one to start school. Like having a baby, there is never an ideal time to move country.

So you might as well to do it now.

Convinced? Start searching for your new job and life in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

Fight or flight: what to expect when you arrive in a new country

You’ve been excitedly planning your move for months but now you’ve landed and you’re not feeling so sure. Don’t worry – these feelings are absolutely normal and part of what’s known as the settlement curve.

In fact, there are six distinct stages most people go through as they settle in a new country – here’s what to expect over your first 18 months to two years.

The settlement curve

 

Diagram source: Immigration New Zealand Settlement Services.

Stage one: forethought

This stage is all about the excitement of planning with lots of positivity about your move to your new country. It’s important to have realistic expectations about your new home country, however, so now’s the time to look into jobs, get an idea of cost of living and research where you’re going to settle.

Stage two: fun

You’ve arrived and it’s brilliant fun. New people, new places and new experiences mean you’re feeling really positive about your new home.

Stage three: fright

Uh-oh. Something’s happened. It might be something major (a family member has fallen ill) or something small (you’re stuck in traffic for the fifth day in a row) – whatever it is, it’ll make you feel frustrated which in turn makes you feel unhappy.

Stage four: flight

Ok, something has happened – and you don’t have a strong network of friends or family to call on yet in your new home country. This is the point that you may decide to move on or return to your country of origin.

Stage five: fight

Time to embrace your inner Rocky. This is your turning point – you become realistic about what it’s like to live in your new country and make a conscious decision to stay and build your life here.

Stage six: fit

Welcome to everyday life. By this stage, your challenges are more about the usual day to day stuff people think about, rather than being about living in a new country. You’ve now decided to stay which helps you to feel like you ‘fit’ in. Congratulations – you’ve made it!

Dealing with the six stages

First off, remember that everyone who has ever been in your position will have experienced these emotions at some point. Understand that it’s completely normal and natural and try some of these tips to help you deal with your emotions:

  • Keep talking – to your other half, your family or your employer. Sharing your fears will help you deal with them.
  • Get out and about – the couch may be calling but that’s not going to help you feel more settled. Go for a walk, get some fresh air, make the most of that new lifestyle you were after. Remind yourself why you wanted to move.
  • Get involved – join your colleagues at the next social gathering, sign up to a gym, research local clubs – anything that gets you mingling with people and involved with your new life. Say yes to every offer that comes your way.
  • Research settlement services – there’s organisations dedicated to helping new migrants feel happy in their new homes. Check out Settlement Support New Zealand, find settlement services in Australia or search for immigration services in Canada.

Have you made the move? Did you experience a rollercoaster journey through the settlement curve? What helped you?

Live in New Zealand: you want to break free?

Our Marketing Manager Julie waxes lyrical about the lifestyle in New Zealand – including award-winning wines, delicious antipasto platters and spectacular scenic drives. Be warned: you may want to pack up your bags and hop on the next plane when you get to the end of this.

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In the words of the immortal Freddy Mercury, the scope to do just that in NZ is truly endless. In fact, on your doorstep is sea, sun, sand, bungy jumping, skiing and boating to name just a few.

On that very note I would like (or should I say love) to share an experience with you that whilst not energetic, was incredibly pleasant and satisfying. To set the scene, it’s mid-Sunday morning, the sun is shining so brightly against the azure blue sky, and the ocean is sparkling too. Oh yes, you get to see serious peeks of the pacific ocean throughout the drive to this destination.

Sidebar: one tends to get an ocean vista regularly living on the Auckland Isthmus.

Back to the story, the car journey is leisurely, about a 50-minute drive heading north from central Auckland. Taking you over the harbour bridge (a bungy jumper or bridge walker’s dream), along state highway one, then through the new shortish tunnel. Upon reaching the picturesque town of Warkworth there is sign post pointing to Snells Beach a short 10-minute drive landing us firmly in this amazing place called Brick Bay which is a wee cove that falls away from the main Snells Beach Road. Then winding your way down to the amazing destination known as the Brick Bay Vineyard.

To complete the scene and decadence too, imagine this, you’re sitting in a lovely airy pavilion surrounded by original sculptures overlooking a duck pond with glass of BBV’s very best in hand plus a delicious antipasto platter …. total bliss! You can tell that I am going to highly recommend this amazing spot, plus endorse the many more award-winning vineyards upon which NZ’s wine making reputation is built.

Above is a wee peek of just one of the many fabulous sculptures at BBV that can be spotted as you drive in – Rugby World Cup sheep! A very special creation for this major sporting event.

If that’s whet your appetite, see more at Brick Bay Wines website.

Dads down under & other differences between the UK, NZ, Oz & Canada

This weekend, dads around New Zealand and Australia are preparing to be spoilt – Kiwis and Aussies celebrate Father’s Day on the first Sunday in September (might be a bit of a problem if your UK-based dad is used to getting Father’s Day love on the third Sunday in June).

So, what other things might you have to get used to if you swap a home in the UK for life in New Zealand, Australia and Canada?

Public holidays

You can wave goodbye to your UK spring and summer bank holidays – but move to New Zealand and you gain Waitangi Day, Anzac Day and Labour Day while certain areas of Australia enjoy Labour Day and Melbourne Cup Day too. Not forgetting that New Zealand and Australia are patriotic too – they even get Queen’s Birthday as a public holiday. Canada doesn’t do badly either with Canada Day, Labour Day and Thanksgiving Day.

‘isms’

By that we mean the little dialect differences between the countries. In the UK and Canada, every summer you drag out your flip-flops. In Australia, it’s your thongs (conjuring up all kinds of potentially embarrassing situations) and in NZ it’s your jandals. Should someone compliment you on your pants in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, they haven’t suddenly developed x-ray vision and you haven’t had an acute attack of forgetfulness – that’s their equivalent of trousers. While we’re on it, pack your gum boots for life down under (Wellington boots) and your runners for Canada (trainers). A pair of orange flip flops stuck into a beach

The seasons

Luckily, Canada’s in the northern hemisphere too so it’s easy to adjust to summer in June-August and winter in November-February. However, head down under and prepare to get Christmas on the beach and when you’d traditionally be enjoying some summer sunshine in the UK, to be embracing winter sports in Australia and New Zealand instead.

Time difference – or how not to annoy your mum

Judging by the phone in your pocket, bag or lovingly placed on the table in-front of you, you like to be connected. But catching your first midday wave in Oz or trying your first eggs bene brekkie in NZ is not the time to call your nearest and dearest back in the UK – unless you fancy rousing them from their slumber that is. However, if you come across your first moose in Canada you don’t have to wait too long to let your mum know – it’s only a four or five hour time difference.

Over to you

If you moved overseas, what do you reckon you’d miss most about home?

Canadian cities in world domination

Girl jumping with the Canadian flag against backdrop of blue skyNot only does it have Mounties, maple syrup and free-roaming bears, Canada’s now got another reason to be smug – three of its cities make up the world’s top five most liveable cities.

Dominating the top of The Economist magazine’s 2012 list were Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary. The survey ranks 140 cities based on a number of important factors, like health care, stability, culture and environment, education and infrastructure. The maximum score a city could receive was 100.

So how did Canada fare?

Well, Vancouver was the highest-ranked Canadian city, taking the third spot with a score of 97.3. Close on its heels was Toronto in fourth with a score of 97.2, followed up by Calgary in fifth place (tied with Adelaide in Australia) with 96.6.

With its reputation for an outdoorsy lifestyle, welcoming and friendly people and jaw-dropping natural landscape, it’s not really surprising Canada can compete on a global scale.

The full list

According to The Economist, the top 10 most liveable cities 2012 are:
1. Melbourne, Australia
2. Vienna, Austria
3. Vancouver
4. Toronto
5. (tie) Calgary and Adelaide, Australia
7. Sydney, Australia
8. Helsinki, Finland
9. Perth, Australia
10. Auckland, New Zealand

Over to you

What do you think – do you agree with this list? Are there cities you think should be in the top 10?

What is FIFO?

Fly in Fly Out – or FIFO as it is more commonly referred to – is a method of employing people for remote country locations which is very commonly used in Western Australia. As an alternative to relocating entire families to often remote locations, the employee is flown to the work site for a number of days, and then flown home again.

Why FIFO?

Employers prefer their workers to be FIFO as the cost of transporting employees to site is far less than it would be to build, maintain and develop long term communities. Employees may prefer the FIFO opportunity as their families are often reluctant to relocate to small towns in remote areas.

What should I expect?

Mine Workers in Bengalla

Mine Workers in Australia

Rosters dictate how long you are on site, and how long you are home. Most rosters offered are 4 weeks on site and 1 week at home – 4:1 however these rosters vary depending on the project and the site.

Usually a FIFO position involves working a shift of 10 hours each day for a number of continuous days. When on site, you will be supplied with all meals, accommodation, house-keeping – some camps also offer swimming pools, tennis courts, gyms, cable TV and unlimited internet as a way of attracting and retaining skilled staff.

Read on for more on what’s driving the industry here in Australia and how you can get your FIFO job:

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Could Australian heavy construction projects be the opportunity you are looking for?

Newman Hub Conveyors

Conveyors at the Newman Hub processing centre

Australia currently has tremendous job opportunities on some the biggest heavy construction projects wordlwide.

Within the construction industry the term “heavy” refers to items produced such as iron ore, coal, oil and gas etc. Owners of heavy construction projects are usually large, for-profit, industrial corporations. These corporations can be found in such industries as Infrastructure, power transmission and distribution, metallurgical and material handling, oil and gas, chemical, power generation, mineral processing etc.

Heavy construction projects require a team of qualified individuals to ensure successful project completion. Specifically, in the fields of mechanical and structural engineering, project management, construction management, quality surveying, Health Safety & Environmental and quality assurance management. In Australia majority of heavy construction projects are located in regional areas ‘outback Australia’ therefore, fly in and fly out (FIFO) rosters have been adopted as a method of employment.

Read on for details on some of the biggest current projects here in Australia:
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How to get reliable immigration advice

Hi Everyone

This week, we have some great tips for helping you to find reliable visa and immigration advice. If you’re serious about moving country, one of the best things you can do for yourself is to get a reputable immigration adviser. Why? You’ve all heard the saying a stitch in time saves nine, and this is one case where it’s certainly true!

Why use an immigration adviser?

  • An immigration adviser will give you a realistic idea of your chances of success right from the word go. Of course, your eligibility will depend on your individual circumstances, including factors such as your age, work experience, skills and language ability.
  • If you are eligible, you’ll be told what immigration pathways are available and which one is going to work best for you. You won’t waste time and money heading down the wrong path then having to do a ‘u-turn’ later on.
  • You get the bonus of expert advice to sort out any hitches along the way. Immigration law can be a difficult beastie at the best of times and it’s constantly changing, so up-to-date advice not only smooths out the snags en route, it helps prevent them in the first place!

How can I pick a reliable immigration adviser?

  • Choose someone who is licensed or registered. Legitimate advisers and agents are regulated by a professional body which helps ensure that they are competent. While it won’t necessarily guarantee you professional service, it will go a long way to weeding out ‘cowboy’ outfits! In New Zealand, agents are called licensed immigration advisers, and they are regulated by the Immigration Advisers Authority (IAA); in Australia, they are called registered  migration agents and they are regulated by MARA; and in Canada, they are called immigration consultants and they are regulated by the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC).
  • Ensure that their membership is current. If a licensed agent or business has been investigated for failing to provide a professional service, their licence will have been cancelled. Make a quick call to the regulatory body first to make sure they are still legit before you hand over any money!
  • Check out their credentials. You wouldn’t rent out your house or employ someone without checking their references, so ask if you can speak to a recent client, and check out the agency online too (web, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn). A reputable company will have a professional online presence with a history that can be tracked. If you have friends who’ve already migrated, ask them who they used and what their experience was, or visit ex-pat forums and get recommendations that way. This kind of research takes a bit of extra effort, but it pays off in the long run!

What next?

  • Read up about the immigration categories for New Zealand, Australia and Canada so you know what to expect.
  • If you’re considering emigrating as a skilled migrant, take Working In’s free online visa assessment to have see if you have the right skills to move to Australia or New Zealand. This will help you to determine if it’s worthwhile proceeding.
  • Visit our visa sections for Australia, New Zealand and Canada. There’s loads of info here, including more about visa categories and policy, and reputable advisers in Australia, NZ and Canada who can help you with your move.

Come and see us in person in the UK in June/July!
We have immigration advisers and migration agents attending our Opportunities Overseas Expos to help you with your migration questions so, if you are relocating, make sure you come along to an expo near you! We’ll be in in the UK in Leeds on 30 June-1 July, and in London on 7-8 July, and we’ll have some great job opportunities as well.

Hope to see you there!

Skill shortages in Oz & NZ

Hi again!

Great to see so many of you (9,210 altogether!) visiting us at our Opportunities Overseas Expos in London and Manchester last month, and at our Energy, Mining & Engineering expo in Aberdeen. There’s lots of great talent out there, and many of you who came along are now going through the recruitment process and getting ready for the next exciting step of your journey.

Next up, we’ll be bringing employers from NZ, Australia and Peru to Canada for the Energy, Mining & Engineering International Jobs Expo in May, so what better time to look at the areas of skill shortage, and find out just who’s in demand at the moment.

The Aussie mining boom
Everyone’s heard about the mining boom in Aussie, so it’s no surprise to find that main areas of skill shortage are connected to the mining and oil & gas sector. With a whopping US$229 billion (AU$232 billion) of committed gas projects in the pipeline, Australia has a critical shortage of experienced engineers, tradespeople and construction workers to staff up its raft of mega projects.

Calling all Senior Engineers!
Engineering shortages are biting especially hard, as major mining projects, including the massive AU$43 billion Gorgon project, exhaust the local labour supply. Australia’s national engineering body, Engineers Australia, has predicted that the country’s engineering workforce will need to double just to keep pace with the rapid development, so if you have engineering skills – especially at a senior level – you’ll be very much in demand!

Some of the roles that Aussie employers are recruiting for in Canada include well, reservoir & petroleum engineers; principal, civil, mechanical & process engineers; drilling supervisors; hydrologists; project directors and managers; health & safety managers and engineering managers.

Other energy/infrastructure specialists in demand include transmission line practitioners, waste water and water planning engineers,  site supervisors, environmental advisors and senior planners

Skill shortages in New Zealand
In New Zealand, the skills shortages may not be quite as intense, but the country’s growing energy sector is still short of skilled professionals, with mining specialists, engineers and geologists high on the list of those most in demand. The Christchurch rebuild is also putting the squeeze on the labour market, with engineers and skilled trades already in demand – a shortfall of up to 30,000 workers has already been forecast during the 10-20 year rebuild period.

Some of the roles that NZ employers are recruiting for at the Canada expos include mining, petroleum, geotechnical & field engineers; technical services and production superintendents; and exploration & mine geologists. Within the energy/power sector, there are roles for project engineers & managers, power system analysts, electrical network engineers, electricity asset managers, engineering analysts and substation design engineers.

Come & see us in Canada
So, if you’re in Canada, and you’re working in the oil & gas, energy, engineering or infrastructure sectors, come along and check out the jobs available in Oz & NZ (we’ll also have some jobs in Peru – again, mining-related roles including heavy diesel mechanics and truck operators!). 

We’ll be touching down in the three Canadian cities in 2012: Calgary (5-6 May) at the Calgary TELUS Convention Centre; Vancouver (9 May) at the Hyatt Regency and Edmonton (12-13 May) at the Mayfield Inn & Suites.

Where to book
You can find out more about companies attending and the roles being recruited for at:
www.workingin.com/eme

CALGARY | BOOK NOW
VANCOUVER | BOOK NOW
EDMONTON | BOOK NOW

Hope to see you there!

Moving countries? Why should you go to a job expo?

Hi – and hello 2012! Fresh start to a fresh year and, if you’re still serious about moving country, now is the time to put those job hunting plans into action!

If you’re in the UK or Europe, getting a job sorted from the other side of the globe can seem like something for the ‘too hard’ basket but these days, if you can’t go to the employers, the good news is, they can come to you!

Finding a job – the easy way!

Finding a job at the Opportunities Overseas ExpoWorking In is holding its first migration and job expos for the year in London (this weekend, 24-25 March), Aberdeen
(28 March) and Manchester
(31 March-1 April),
and we’ll have dozens of employers flying in from New Zealand, Canada and Australia. The big bonus is that meeting potential employers face to face gives you a huge advantage in the job hunting process, and because you don’t have to leave the country, even better!

Why meet employers in person?

  • You have an unbeatable opportunity to sell your best asset – yourself! – up close and personal.
  • You can tell pretty much straight away if there’s a good fit between you both, and whether or not you’ll fit in with the company culture and philosophy.
  • If you plan your day properly, and do some research on the roles being recruited, you have the advantage of checking out not just one, but hundreds of employment opportunities – all under the same roof!
  • It’s an invaluable opportunity to network and build contacts. Make sure you prepare hard copies of your up-to-date CV to hand out to employers and, if possible, bring along a copy on a memory stick.
  • If it leads to a job or a job offer, then you’ve already smoothed the pathway for your visa application and increased your chances of being accepted.

Do your research on the jobs available!

A word of advice, before you go, save yourself time and do some research on the roles each company is offering. Getting the right match between your work experience and the jobs on offer is vital.

You can see what skills employers are looking to fill by clicking on the company logos on the Canada, NZ  and Australia pages.

Feeling inspired? Then get along and get that job!

BOOK NOW for Opportunities Australia: London, Aberdeen & Manchester
BOOK NOW  for Opportunities Canada: London, Aberdeen & Manchester.
BOOK NOW  for Opportunities New Zealand: London, Aberdeen & Manchester.

See you there!

Where have we been?

Hi Everyone,

sorry it has been so long since our last post but as you know we were over in the UK at our Expos in Leeds and London and the interest was even higher than expected. Over 5000 people attended and we were flat out busy. Jenny and I are now back safely in the New Zealand office (well, actually Jenny is taking a well deserved break in Fiji) and I just wanted to let you know how things have moved on already for some of the people we met at the expo.

The employers and recruiters who flew over from Australia and New Zealand were all really pleased with the quality of the people they met in the UK. Many have already offered jobs to the people they met who are ready to move and they are busy following up on the hundreds of others whose skills are needed.

The key thing to remember here is that when you come to an expo the exhibitors will be talking to a lot of people and they will be focusing very closely on those people who are ready to make the move. Coming to the expos and being able to show how committed you are will put you ahead of the others who are researching the move. Although employers and recruiters have flown thousands of miles to meet you they are still looking for the best quality people who are committed to making the move.

Of course we have lots of people who come along to the expos because they are researching the move and they want to know the best way to proceed. I personally met thousands of people who attended our working in seminars on Australia and New Zealand and hopefully got to speak to most of you. If you are not sure of the best way for you and your family to migrate then the best thing to do at the expo is sign up for our migration map and hundreds of people did this and we are now busy having consultations with these people giving them all the information they need to be able to proceed and that information is tailored to them and their circumstances.

Of course it’s not all work and it was good to spend some time in Leeds as I hadn’t been there in years and any down time in London is always fun. There is a lot of meeting and mingling with all the exhibitors at these events and this is where we have a unique position compared to other immigration companies. Not only do we organise the expos but we also exhibit at them and build relationships with all the other exhibitors and are in constant touch with them making those relationships work for our visa clients.

So if you did come along to the expo I would love to hear from you so please leave a comment. We are already getting busy organising our Canadian, South Africa and next round of UK expos due to take place in November.

I’ll be giving you some insider tips on how to make the most of the expo and even running some competitions so you can win some free tickets so do interact with us on this blog and we will respond to all comments.

We aim to blog more frequently (well when Jen gets back from FIJI, can you tell I’m jealous) so do keep checking in and tell your friends.

For those of you looking for jobs in New Zealand or Australia here are some handy tips to help you on your way.

A Positive attitude – You need to come across to employers as committed to the move with an upbeat positive flexible attitude. If you can also show commitment to the move by visits you have made to Australia or New Zealand or show engagement with a company such as workingin visas this can also add to your appeal

A Good CV – It is very important to have your CV formatted in a way that suits the employers. This could be very different to how you currently format your CV. Grammar and spelling is crucial and your CV should be tailored to each application

Understand your potential employer – Read the job description carefully. What are they looking for? Who are they and what do they do? You need to do as much research as possible before applying

Be Proactive – Follow up your job applications with phone calls as well as emails. Phone calls show motivation and are the best way to make contact. Keep track of your applications and even follow up the rejections with a request for feedback.

Know your timeframes – This is essential. Do not apply for jobs unless you are able to move. Some employers will wait months but most will want you to start work ASAP.

Leave your comments we want to hear from you

Ka Kite (bye for now)

Paul Goddard

IAA license 201001948

New Zealand will rebuild

It has been a very difficult week here in New Zealand. We have seen the countries worst natural disaster hit Christchurch and it has shocked everyone. This is extra cruel as the city was just starting to recover from the earthquake in September. We knew there could be large aftershocks from that original quake and the people of Christchurch have been living with these for months but this quake was a new one. These events are predicted to occur once every 600 years but to have two within 6 months is very unusual.
The first quake happened in the middle of night and caused relatively little damage but last week the quake hit at lunch time and centered just 10 k from Christchurch CBD. The devastation is massive and the death toll us likely to exceed 200. Christchurch is a beautiful city. I have visited many times and have friends there who I am pleased to say are all safe. It is hard even to look at the images of places you know well just completely destroyed but this being New Zealand people will soon start focusing on rebuilding. The CBD is going to be closed for months and the cost of the quake will likely be more than 10 billion dollars but NZ is one of the best prepared countries for this type of event. The earthquake commission has billions of dollars set aside and the response from the rest if the world has been amazing. Once the rebuild starts it will provide work for the construction industry which has been hard hit in recent years and we may even need more construction people from overseas
Inevitably an event like this will see people leave Christchurch never to return so the city will need to build more than buildings and infrastructure. There are no figures on this at the moment and the people of Christchurch are very proud of their city so let’s see what happens.
The quake will effect the NZ economy as well Christchurch contributes 10% of the countries GDP, so measures will need to be put in place and this will take years to recover from.
Everyone is getting behind the city and we will soon hear some good news stories as people start to focus on making the city even better than it was before. For now all of us outside Christchurch are giving all the support we can. Earthquakes are something we live with in NZ and in the eight years I have lived here I have only felt one. Thankfully an event like the Christchurch quake is rare.

the following video just about says it all

Ka Kite

Paul Goddard

Meeting People is Easy

We have been in the UK for a week now and have met thousands of people at our expos and seminars in Manchester and Newcastle. I have been coming over to the UK for the past four years and I can say that there seems to be a change in peoples motivations for making a move to New Zealand or Australia. With the recovery from recession seeming to stall in the UK people who may have been postponing their emigration plans in hope of an improvement in the housing market or exchange rate now seem resigned to the fact that they may need to wait years for any improvements.
When you factor in the improving NZ economy and buoyant Australian outlook any gains in exchange rates may be wiped off by rising house prices in the country you are moving to.

It’s all swings and roundabouts

99% of the people I have met so far have asked me one question

“I want to emigrate and have done some research but I just need to know what to do next?”

Planning the move is essential but how can you make plans if you are unsure of where to begin or what steps and timeframes are involved ?

The answer is simple

Find out exactly what your visa options are, your job prospects in your chosen country, how long it will take you to make the move and what costs are involved.

That is a lot of information to gather and every persons move is different and this is where people get stuck. I see some if the same faces at our expos and seminars year after year and these people ask me the same question because they are going round and round in circles trying to figure out what to do and being distracted by the mountain of information that is on the Internet.

If you want to emigrate leave me a comment and I will let you know exactly what to do so you can start on your journey.

Well I am writing this while on the train journey down to Birmingham for our next seminar and from there it’s onto London for our next expo in London which is going to be massive!
If you are coming along by all means ask me the question and I will tell you the answer. If you want to make the move just be willing to listen.

Ka Kite ( bye for now )

Paul Goddard

Flying 12000 miles

Well it’s late on a Sunday night here in NZ and I am writing this blog on my iPod so please excuse the spelling. I am just about to take the 24hour flight from New Zealand to the UK for our expos and seminars. It’s been a busy week and we now have over 400 live jobs that we will be bringing to the UK with us from NZ and 100 s more waiting back in NZ. If you are coming along make sure you speak to Jenny who is our international employment facilitator who assists people with our journey to work service. For those of you who have been to other Expos and felt you got lots of information but left the event with more questions than you started with our expos and seminars are different. If you come along to the working in visa stand you will get an overview of the immigration process and be able to speak directly with licensed advisors who have helped hundreds of people make the move to New Zealand and Australia. Get the insight from people who have actually made the move and settled successfully. If you are serious about migrating check out http://www.expo-newzealand.com
I will also be posting a daily video blog on our facebook page for behind the scenes footage and some insight into why we do what we do. Watch and you may be surprised. Follow us on facebook via http://www.workingin.com
On a personal note it has been a tough weekend where we had to put one if our dogs down after a long term skin condition. We have a beautiful house in NZ with a large garden that he loved racing around and barking at the horses and various birds that flew into his territory. We originally shipped two dogs from the UK to NZ and they have both now passed on but Winston was our first kiwi dog. So my thoughts are with my family and also with those of you who want to make this life changing journey no matter how hard it can be sometimes. I look forward to sharing my experiences with you.

See you in the UK soon

Paul Goddard

Interest in emigrating is still high

I am now getting used to being back in the UK and it looks like we have bought the sun with us from New Zealand. The expos went really well and were very busy. It was great to meet such a wide range of people and see that the interest in emigrating is very strong. Apparently around 50% of people consider moving to a different country at some point in their life. For most people it’s not an easy decision and it takes a lot of research and the expo was great for getting information. A lot of people I met were totally committed to making the move but were unsure of how to proceed. It was great to be able to help them take that first step to a new life and it reminded me of how I felt when we first commited to making the move. It’s exciting and scary but also helps focus your plans to make the move successful.
Looking forward to seeing a bit of London later on today while the sun is shining. Have to buy something for my wife and children so a call into the shopping centre in Hammersmith might be on the cards. I had to remember it was mothers day yesterday as we have a different date in New Zealand so my parents are lucky they as they get two days per year.
Will update you with another blog before I get on the train to Manchester. If you are interested in coming along and meeting us you can book here http://www.expo-newzealand.com

See you soon

Paul Goddard

Hello London

Well here is my first blog of the trip to the UK for our expos. The flight over was incident free and I managed to watch six films and every episode of top gear (no I can’t sleep on planes). Arrived in London yesterday and it’s not as cold as I thought it was going to be. We are all really busy getting ready for the expos and it seems NZ immigration have been busy as well as they have just announced a new retirement visa. There has been talk of this for a while now and it’s great to see it has finally happened. There is criteria to meet and we will be giving more info in our next newsletter. This is the second new visa category announced this month and the skills shortages in NZ and job vacancies are increasing. Do come along and meet me at the expo in London and Manchester EXPO it will be great to see you and I’m looking forward to giving some advice on how to secure a Job offer in NZ. I am just finalizing my presentation and I promise to make it as interesting as possible. I know a lot of people want to get as much information as possible when they commit to emigrating and we are making ourselves available for one to one consultations during the week so if you want to meet us to discuss your move please do let me know.
Well I’m going to sign off now and will blog again as soon as I can. Apologies for any typos but I have found the best Internet access is round the corner from our hotel so I am blogging from my iPod! What would we do without broadband eh?

Ka kite (bye for now)

Paul

Welcome, Kia Ora, Gidday

Welcome everyone to my first blog post in my new role here at www.workingin-visa.com It’s been a whirlwind week for me that was broken up with a 3 day school camp with my son in the New Zealand wilderness. Much fun was had tramping through the forest and swimming under waterfalls!

We are all flat out busy at the moment planning our UK visit and I am really looking forward to meeting you in the UK during our expos in March. 2010 is going to be a great year if you are looking at emigrating down under. Australia didn’t go into recession during 2009 and New Zealand also came through the recession strongly. Things are feeling very upbeat here and even the summer weather seems to be holding on.

Even though I have been working in the immigration industry for a number of years now I am really excited by what we can offer people like you who are looking to emigrate. Their really is no other immigration company with the networks and experience of Working In and that was really important in me making my decision to join the company.

I will be updating this blog on a regular basis and giving you all sorts of useful information. I also want to hear from you so please leave your comments for me to look at. I made the move to New Zealand seven years ago with my family and we knew nobody here and had never visited when we committed to the move. It is the most life changing thing you will ever do and my advice is to make sure you do it right first time. I know what you are about to experience and you can learn from my mistakes. Believe me I made a few!

I have no regrets and we are still experiencing new things every day.  So until next time….

Ka Kite (bye for now)

Paul Goddard

www.workingin-visa.com

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