Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘Immigration’

New Zealand’s Welcome Mat for New Migrants

On 1  November 2015, a new policy came into place to attract new migrants to take up jobs in regional New Zealand.

‘Regional New Zealand’ means any place outside of the area covered by the Auckland Council (if you know Auckland, that means south of the Bombay Hills; and north just past Warkworth).

Additional Bonus Points

The new measure boosts the bonus points for skilled migrants applying for residence with a job offer outside Auckland – from 10 to 30 points.

And if you are applying under the business categories the points are doubled for entrepreneurs planning to set up businesses in the regions under the Entrepreneur Work Visa from 20 to 40 points.

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Why is New Zealand trying to attract people to locations outside of Auckland?

NZ’s Prime Minister says almost half of the 10,000 skilled migrants (and their families) who get residence each year move to the financial capital.

On the new policy, he says that “we want to balance that out a bit, by attracting more people into other parts of the country to help grow local economies”.

Migrants with offers for jobs in the regions will get extra points that will count towards the 100 they require to apply for residence.

However, they will need to commit to a region for at least 12 months – up from the current requirement of three months.

Business Opportunities

Mr Key has also unveiled changes to encourage entrepreneurs wanting to come to New Zealand to look for business opportunities in the regions. He said these changes will help spread the benefits of migration across the country – particularly in regions that are in greater need for workers, skills and investment.

 

NZ’s Immigration Changes – The Facts

For migrants:

  • Skilled migrants must reach a 100 point threshold to apply for residence – certain skills, industries, job offers and qualifications have a higher number of points attached to them
  • The bonus points for a job offer outside Auckland will increase from 10 to 30, therefore making it easier for them to apply
  • They will need to commit to a region for at least 12 months – up from the current three month requirement

Entrepreneurs:

  • An entrepreneur work visa was launched by the government last year to attract migrants who offer high-level business experience, capital and international connections
  • The extra points they get for setting up a business outside Auckland will double – from 20 to 40
  • Immigration New Zealand expects to approve up to 200 people in 2016 under the entrepreneur visa category

 

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Our view is that there are many fantastic,  challenging work opportunities in New Zealand – and the other main centres of Wellington, Christchurch, Queenstown, Tauranga and New Plymouth have a lot to offer.

Have a look in the jobs section of our Working In New Zealand website, to find something that suits you – or Like our Facebook page to keep up-to-date on New Zealand immigration and employment news.

 

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Immigration news round-up – October 2015

This month, Australia has recently launched a work and holiday arrangement with the People’s Republic of China and a new online visa label system. In Canada, there’s a mixed bag of news – from holds on some visa schemes to increased thresholds for other schemes. With all these changes, you could benefit from some Canadian visa advice – see who can help.

Plus in New Zealand there’s great news for overseas agricultural workers seeking seasonal work, plus some handy information about what you can and can’t bring into the country.

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Australia

Work and Holiday arrangement with the People’s Republic of China now live

As of 21 September 2015, up to 5,000 educated young Chinese nationals per year will be able to take advantage of the Work and Holiday visa arrangement between Australia and the People’s Republic of China.

The visa allows young Chinese nationals to have an extended holiday of up to 12 months in Australia, where they can undertake short-term work or study.

If you’re a Chinese national visit the Australian Embassy Beijing website to see if you’re eligible. Or find out more about Australia’s working holiday visa scheme.

Electronic visa record replaces passport labels

Traditionally when you received your Australian visa, a label was fixed into your passport. However, from 1 September 2015, you’re no longer able to request and pay for a visa label.

Instead, you access your visa record through the free Visa Entitlement Verification Online (VEVO) service. When you scan your passport at the airport, it’s linked automatically to this service and will let passport officials know your visa status.

This change reflects the Australian Government’s agenda to make their services more accessible and convenient to their clients through the provision of secure online services. VEVO is also efficient, reliable and provides real-time information about your visa.

This demonstrates Australia’s commitment to a overhauled, more streamlined and efficient visa system. More information is available at the Department of Immigration and Border Protection.

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Canada

Fast track your move to Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia, on Canada’s east coast, has just announced they will be able to fast track another 300 migrant workers who qualify under the express entry visa scheme that’s aimed at skilled workers.

It also means that Nova Scotia can nominate a total of 1,350 immigrants in 2015 under their provincial nominee program – almost double the previously allowed 700.

Nova Scotia remains a popular choice for skilled workers. In 2014, 2,670 newcomers settled in Nova Scotia – more people than have ever arrived in the past 10 years. Nova Scotia clearly offers a lot to would-be Canadians too – Statistics Canada show a retention rate of 71 per cent for immigrants that landed in Nova Scotia between 2007 and 2011.

If you’d like to take advantage of this fast track entry to Nova Scotia, take a look at some job opportunities – having a Canadian job offer may help your visa application. Or find out more about Nova Scotia’s nominee program.

Alberta and British Columbia release updates to their Provincial Nominee Programs

Canadian provinces manage their own visa schemes, called Provincial Nominee Programs (PNP). They all have their own rules, requirements and application thresholds. Alberta and British Columbia have both released updates to their programs:

Alberta

Due to a 10,000-application backlog, no new applications will be accepted to the Alberta Immigration Nominee Program until January 2016. However, if you’re interested in moving to Alberta, you can still apply through Canada’s express entry visa scheme.

British Columbia

Applications to the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BCPNP) Skills Immigration stream and Express Entry stream have been put on hold until early 2016, due to application thresholds being met.

However, the Health Care Professional, Northeast Pilot Project and Entrepreneur Immigration streams will continue to accept applications.

Find out more about the BCPNP.

Skill shortages felt across Canada

A new survey by CareerBuilder.ca shows the impact of skill shortages on Canadian businesses:

  • 29% of survey respondents (almost three in 10 employers) have jobs that have been unfilled for 12 weeks or longer.
  • Three quarters of those respondents say this has negatively impacted upon their companies.
  • 31% of respondents said that un-fillable job openings lead to work not getting done – with 22% saying their companies are losing revenue.

With Canadian businesses feeling the pinch of a lack of skilled workers, this may be good news for skilled workers wanting to move to Canada – watch this space.

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New Zealand

Overseas agricultural contractors able to work easier in NZ

By 1 June 2016, seasonal workers from overseas could find it easier to temporarily work and live in New Zealand. A new visa deal means that rural contractors can more simply bring in overseas workers to help them over the busy summer harvest season.

Rural Contractors New Zealand (RCNZ) president Steve Levet estimates that the industry requires around 900 seasonal staff from overseas each year. In New Zealand there is a shortage of suitably skilled operators able to handle highly sophisticated machinery – so they look overseas for the skills they need.

These overseas workers – traditionally from Ireland and England – have good mechanical skills and are already up and running, meaning they don’t require extensive training.

About the new scheme

With a less rigorous process than what currently has to be followed, under the new scheme RCNZ would apply for Approval in Principle on behalf of all its members.

Then their members can apply online for a visa for the person they’re recruiting without having to meet any of the current requirements, which include having to advertise and going through Work and Income New Zealand first.

No further details are available at this stage – we’ll keep you updated. If you’re not already on our New Zealand mailing list, sign up [Link to: NZ newsletter sign up] and you’ll be the first to know.

Arriving in New Zealand – What you need to know

Whether you’re just visiting or are coming to New Zealand permanently, there are things you need to know.

For starters, do you need a visa? If you’re going on holiday, you might not – see if you need a visitor’s visa.  If you’d like to work and live in New Zealand, you will – read more about NZ visas.

What you can’t bring in to NZ

Pretty standard stuff, but this list includes:

  • Hazardous materials.
  • Endangered species (without a permit).
  • Weapons (without a permit).
  • Objectionable publications, including videos and digital images, or
  • Controlled drugs.

What you have to declare

New Zealand has very strict biosecurity rules – not surprisingly as any rogue flora or fauna can wreck havoc on its unique ecosystem. This means you have to declare the following items when you arrive:

  • Food of any kind – this even includes any food, especially fruit, you might have picked up on the plane or coming through duty free.
  • Plants or parts of plants (alive or dead).
  • Animals (alive or dead) or their products.
  • Equipment used with animals.
  • Camping gear, golf clubs and used bicycles – even muddy walking boots.
  • Biological specimens.

Anything you declare will be examined to check it’s ok to bring into NZ. This may include it being cleaned or treated before being allowed in.

The fines for not declaring any of the above are very high – and not worth the risk.

For more information about what you can (and can’t) bring in New Zealand, visit the New Zealand Government website.

Migration to New Zealand reaching its peak

New Zealand has always been a popular choice for skilled international workers but now, finally, the figures seem to be nearing their peak. A recent report by Westpac, a NZ bank, shows that migration to NZ is slowing.

One reason that could be behind this is the approval process for a resident visa, which favours applicants who have a job offer in New Zealand. Another is that NZ’s residence approval targets remain at 45,000 – 50,000 a year, which simply has not kept up with the demand.

Finally, Westpac estimated that Auckland (prime location of choice for most migrant workers) is not keeping up with the housing demand, which is under pressure from both migrant arrival and natural occupant increase.

So, if you’re thinking of coming to New Zealand, make sure you consider other parts of the country before you make the move.  It’s not impossible to get your metaphorical foot in the door in Auckland, but making sure you’ve ticked key boxes (like getting a job prior) will help you get ahead.

Photos from Working International Expo Manchester – 17-18 October 2015

Our Manchester event this weekend (17-18 October 2015) marked our final expo in the UK for 2015.  The quality of candidates over the weekend was fantastic – and we’re looking forward to seeing Manchester (and London) again in March 2016.

Exhibitors were very impressed with the people they met in Manchester.

Construction workers and senior construction managers required for large builds in NZ.

Construction workers and senior construction managers required for large builds in NZ.

Nursing jobs available here in Melbourne and Victoria.

Nursing jobs available here in Melbourne and Victoria.

Get help with your move to OZ from locals.

Get help with your move to OZ from locals.

A very positive event with people finding out what life they could have overseas.

A very positive event with people finding out what life they could have overseas.

Land of the long white clouds anyone?

Land of the long white clouds anyone?

Construction workers and senior construction managers required for large builds in NZ.

Construction workers and senior construction managers required for large builds in NZ.

Western Australia has a huge requirement for health workers.

Western Australia has a huge requirement for health workers.

Immigration news round-up – September 2015

As September slides around, it’s been a bit quiet on the visa news front from Australia, Canada and New Zealand. This is true for New Zealand especially – perhaps because the national focus is on that upcoming Rugby World Cup?

This month find out the financial benefits of moving to Australia for skilled workers; about two more visa schemes for Canada; and an upcoming snapshot of life for new Kiwis.

Australia

Moving to Australia pays off?

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has, for the first time, released some data on the personal income of Australian migrants. If you’re wondering about the financial implications of a move to Australia, have a look at some key figures:

  • The total income of migrant taxpayers in the 2009-10 financial year was $37.7 billion
  • Employee income contributed 92% to total income, of which $25.5 billion was reported by migrants from the skilled visa stream
  • Skilled visa holders’ average employee income was about $5,000 higher than the national average of $48,907 for all Australian taxpayers

So moving to Australia under the skilled visa stream means you could have an income higher than other Australian taxpayers.

Read all the data on the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ website, or start looking for that skilled job in Australia.

Canada

Quebec Immigration Investor Program reopens

If you’re keen on Canada, you’ll be pleased to hear that Quebec’s Immigration Investor Program has reopened. One of the world’s most popular immigrant investor programmes, this visa scheme allows qualified investors and their dependent family members the chance to gain Canadian permanent residency through investing CAD$800,000 risk-free, through an approved financial intermediary.

Applications opened on 31 August 2015 and will close 29 January 2016 – although it’s expected that the application quota of 1,750 will be reached before then.

Find out more about the requirements at Quebec’s official immigration website.

British Columbia needs skilled trade workers

Fort St John, in the north of the Canadian province of British Columbia, has recently announced the establishment of a pilot programme to bring in skilled international workers.

They are looking especially for skilled and experienced trade workers, such as electricians and welders.

No further details are available yet, but we’ll update you as soon as they become available.

New Zealand

Migrant Survey

Immigration New Zealand has begun the process of collecting data for its 2015 Migrant Survey. It’s an annual survey, sent out to a random sample of people who’ve been through New Zealand’s immigration process, that asks for feedback on topics including jobs, education background and levels of happiness.

Immigration New Zealand then takes on board the feedback to work out how new Kiwis settle into New Zealand and whether they can improve their services for future new migrants.

As the survey has just been sent out, we don’t have details of the results yet but it’s sure to be an interesting snapshot of life in New Zealand for new Kiwis. We’ll make sure we post the survey results when they’re released – if you haven’t already, sign up to our newsletter.  We’ll then email you this survey data when it’s available – easy!

Maid of the Mist VII, Niagara Falls

What jobs are on the New Zealand Skills Shortage List?

Before you get too carried away switching your rugby allegiance to the All Blacks or starting to brush up on your Kiwi slang, it’s a good idea to see whether your skills are needed in New Zealand.

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Although having a job on one of New Zealand’s skill shortage lists isn’t a guarantee of a job or a visa, it can help make the job- and visa-getting experience a bit easier.

There are four skill shortage lists in New Zealand:

  1. Long Term Skill Shortage List
  2. Immediate Skill Shortage List
  3. Canterbury Skill Shortage List
  4. List of Skilled Occupations

Immigration New Zealand has a great tool – put in your occupation and see if it’s a skill in demand. Try the skill shortage list check.

The Long Term Skill Shortage List (LTSSL)

The LTSSL shows the occupations that are in ongoing shortage throughout New Zealand, and the rest of the world.

If you get a job in an occupation that’s on the LTSSL, plus meet any extra requirements, you may be granted a work visa under the Work to Residence category.

That means you may be able to apply for residency in two years, as long as you meet the standard requirements and that your job has a base salary of at least NZ$55,000 per year.

See if your occupation is on the LTSSL.

Immediate Skill Shortage List (ISSL)

The ISSL has occupations where skilled workers are needed immediately in New Zealand and where there are no available New Zealand citizens or residents to take the jobs. This means the applications can be processed quicker.

If you’re offered a job on the ISSL, and meet the requirements, you may be granted an Essential Skills work visa. You can work in New Zealand temporarily but may not be able to apply for residency.

See if your occupation is on the ISSL.

Canterbury Skill Shortage List (CSSL)

Following the Christchurch 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, the CSSL lists the occupations in critical shortage in the Canterbury region. It has occupations on the Immediate and Long Term Skill Shortage Lists that are directly relevant to the Canterbury and Christchurch rebuild.

If your skills are on the CSSL and you have a job offer in Canterbury you may be granted an Essentials Skills work visa which allows you to work temporarily in New Zealand. However if your occupation is also on the LTSSL, then you may be able to apply for residency.

See if your occupation is on the CSSL.

List of Skilled Occupations

If your occupation is on this list, you’re able to apply for a resident visa under the Skilled Migrant  category. This points-based visa considers factors like your age, work experience, qualifications and job offer.

To apply for a Skilled Migrant visa, you must be under 55 years old, meet the skill level for your occupation and meet English language, health and character requirements.

See if your occupation is on the List of Skilled Occupations.

Where to Next?

If you’ve checked the lists and found your occupation, that’s a great first step. You can now:


Make sure you plan your move to New Zealand right the first time, and get the right visa to avoid unnecessary complications later on.  Best of luck!

Immigration news round-up – August 2015

This month has seen the release of interesting findings from Canada’s new Express Entry visa system, and the launch of three new exciting provincial visa streams in Canada.

There’s also news of incentives for would-be Kiwis who are willing to live and work in areas outside of Auckland. Find out how to get your skills assessed in Australia; know your rights on an Australian Working Holiday visa; and beware a phishing scam in New Zealand.

Australia

Assessing Authorities

With some visa applications, you’ll be required to prove that your international skills are transferable and relevant to Australia. To do this, you will need a skills assessment undertaken by an authorised organisation. You’ll need to contact them direct and they can provide you with all the relevant forms and information. You may need to pay to have your skills assessed.

View the assessing authorities in Australia.

Being treated fairly on a Working Holiday Visa

Australia offers Working Holiday visa schemes to many countries, including the UK, Europe and China, giving young people (aged 18-30) the opportunity to travel, work and enjoy Australia.

However two Dutch backpackers are taking their Working Holiday employer to court and suing them for unpaid wages. They undertook the unusual job of golf-ball diving (that’s recovering thousands of lost golf balls from golf course lakes and water features) and are claiming that they weren’t paid fairly for their work.

It’s a good reminder to make sure you fully understand the rules and regulations around Australia’s Working Holiday visa and your rights.

Read more about the backpackers’ experience.

Canada

Express Entry report released

Following the launch of Canada’s Express Entry system in January 2015, Citizenship & Immigration Canada has released a report of key findings from its first six months.

These findings include:

  • The pool is growing by about 1,500 persons/profiles per week.
  • The number of profiles completed was 112,701, with 48,723 (that’s roughly 43%) of these not eligible.
  • The most dominant countries of citizenship of invited candidates are India and the Philippines, which each supplied around one-fifth of those invited to apply.

Through the first 11 draws:

  • 4% of those invited to apply did not have a qualifying job offer or enhanced provincial nomination certificate.
  • 65% had a qualifying job offer.
  • 4% had an enhanced provincial nomination certificate.

However, not including the first four draws (because at that stage only applicants with a score above 600 were invited to apply before this threshold was lowered:

  • 41% of those invited to apply did not have a qualifying job offer or an enhanced provincial nomination certificate.

The majority of candidates selected in the sixth (March 27), eighth (April 17) and eleventh (June 27) draws had neither a qualifying job offer nor a provincial nomination certificate.

See the official data from Citizenship & Immigration Canada.

All of this is great news for people looking to apply for a Canadian visa as the requirements are becoming slightly less restrictive.

British Columbia launches new entrepreneur program

British Columbia has recently launched a new visa program aimed specifically at experienced business people and entrepreneurs. Successful applicants will be awarded a work permit. Then, if their business is commercially viable and provides significant benefits to the local economy, they (and their families) will be able to apply for permanent residency through the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP).

Like other Canadian visa programs, this one will work by you entering a pool of candidates with the aim of getting as many points as possible, out of a maximum 200. Only 200 candidates are accepted into the pool each month. BC PNP will then invite the highest-scoring candidates to submit visa applications.

Requirements for this program include factors such as:

  • Business and/or work experience
  • Personal net worth and source of funds
  • Adaptability
  • Business proposal, including proposal investment and local job creation

Find out more about the BC PNP.

Ontario opens two new immigration streams

Ontario is the most sought-after province by would-be Canadians and it’s just opened two new immigration schemes that are aligned with the Express Entry system:

  1. The Human Capital Priorities stream; and
  2. The French-speaking Skilled Worker stream

Find out more about the streams and whether you’re eligible – Human Capital Priorities stream or French-speaking Skilled Worker stream.

New Zealand

Incentive to move to New Zealand’s provincial centres

Auckland is New Zealand’s largest city, and home to thousands of newly landed skills – and now New Zealand wants to encourage people to look beyond Auckland if they’re making the move.

Effective from November 2015, skilled migrants will have bonus points trebled if they apply for residence with a job offer not from Auckland – although you will have to stay in that region for 12 months, rather than three. If you’re starting a business in the provinces, you’ll have your Entrepreneur Work Visa points doubled.

This means it could be easier and quicker for you to move to New Zealand, as long as you’re willing to live and work outside Auckland.

Scam Immigration NZ website warning

A fake website has been set up that is trying to trick people in providing their passport details. The official Immigration NZ website is www.immigration.govt.nz and the fake one is http://www.immigration-govt.nz.

Beware of this site if you’re searching for the Immigration NZ website.

Read more about the scam. 

Planet-Earth

Immigration News Roundup – July 2015

We keep a lookout for recent immigration changes in Australia, Canada and New Zealand so that you don’t have to. This month discover Australia’s migration trends over the past year, and see whether you’re in demand in South Australia.  Find out about two new Canadian immigration schemes, and see how a licensed immigration adviser can help with your New Zealand online visa application.

Australia

Australia’s Migration Trends 2013–2014

The Australian Department of Immigration and Border Protection has recently released a new report called Australia’s Migration Trends 2013–2014. Some of the key statistics from the report are that in the 2013–2014 programme year:

  • 207,947 permanent migration visas were granted – a decrease of 4.2 per cent on the previous year.
  • This included 190,000 places under Australia’s migration programme.
  • Of the migration programme’s 190,000 visas:
    • 128,550 visas (or 67.7 per cent) were granted through the skill stream.
    • 61,112 visas (or 32.2 per cent) were granted through the family stream.
    • 338 visas (or 0.2 per cent) were granted under the special eligibility visa category.
  • The place where most people moved from was India, with 39,026 places (that’s a 20.5 per cent share).
  • This was followed by the People’s Republic of China (26,776 places) and the UK (23,220 places).
  • Demand for the Temporary Work (Skilled) (subclass 457) visas decreased significantly. Grants for these visas fell 22.0 per cent which may be due to the government’s February 2014 review of the 457 process.

Check out the full report for further details.

Revised South Australia State Occupation List

On 1 July 2015, Immigration South Australia published a revised State Occupation List. Visit Immigration South Australia to view the new list. This list gives you an idea of what skills and jobs are in demand in South Australia. New English requirements for South Australia There have been some changes to the English requirements for some occupations on the South Australia State Occupation List including:

  • ICT occupations – Proficient English is required in each band score (or an overall score of Proficient Plus, i.e. IELTS 7.5 overall).
  • Engineering occupations – Competent Plus English (or an overall score of Proficient, i.e. IELTS 7 overall).

The State Occupation List contains the changes to the English requirements for other occupations.

Canada

Express Entry points requirement decreasing

The new Express Entry system for skilled migration to Canada involves creating a pool of potential applicants, who are invited to apply for a visa through a regular draw. Applicants are awarded points based on certain criteria, like their skills, experience, language capabilities, work history, etc. Two recent draws in June 2015 have seen the level of applicants’ points decreasing yet the number of invitations to apply for a visa increasing. This means meeting the requirements for skilled entry to Canada may be getting a little easier.

New immigration schemes for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia

Two eastern Canadian provinces, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, have recently announced new immigration schemes that are looking for skilled newcomers from overseas. The streams are aligned with the federal Express Entry systems. Although you don’t need a job offer from a Canadian employer to make an application, you must be eligible for either the:

Follow the links to find out more about the New Brunswick Express Entry Labour Market Stream or Nova Scotia Experience: Express Entry.

New Zealand

‘Apply on behalf’ now live

Immigration New Zealand has launched a new service called ‘Apply on Behalf’. This means that licensed immigration advisers and other people exempt from licensing, like lawyers, can now apply for visas online on your behalf. This means they can:

  • Start a new online application for a Student, Work or Visitor visa
  • Complete the application in much the same way as you can
  • View submitted applications and upload supporting documents

This means you could benefit from expert support when it comes to completing your visa application online – and it’s one less thing for you to do. Visa-and-Passport

5 reasons to make the move now

If you subscribed to our email newsletter, chances are you’re seriously considering packing up your life and moving, working, living and playing in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

But you haven’t done it quite yet.

So this month, we’re telling you why you need to make the move – now.

1. Winter is coming

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If you’re in the northern hemisphere, winter is coming. Unlike Game of Thrones, it doesn’t mean murder, mayhem and naughty stuff but, as a lot of Working Inners can attest to (being British expats ourselves), winter isn’t a desperately fun time. Short days, an abundance of darkness, and bad weather inevitably leads to a six-month long hibernation. Not fun. However over in Australia, Canada and New Zealand…

2. An enviable lifestyle

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As spring blooms in the southern hemisphere, its enviable lifestyle comes to the fore. Now, for the next six months, Aussies and Kiwis are making the most of the long, hot, sunny days – whether that’s surfing, hiking, BBQ-ing, beaching, ocean swimming… the list goes on. It may also be coming into winter in Canada, but Canada does winter really well. With its blankets of snow, it’s a winter wonderland – no more hopping on a plane to reach the slopes for skiing and snowboarding, it’s on your doorstep. If you’ve ever wanted the picture perfect Christmas day, now’s the time to get over to Canada.

3. The opportunities are booming

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New Zealand came through the global financial crisis pretty unscathed, reflected in its “rock star” economy. Now there are plenty of exciting opportunities abounding – from helping to rebuild Christchurch, to citywide rail electrification projects, and multi-million dollar infrastructure investment. Australia is continuing to climb out of its downturn and more and more jobs are coming to the market, while Canada’s economy remains strong and, more importantly, continues to grow.

4. Chart-topping success

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Every single year, scores of surveys are released – the world’s best cities, the happiest places to live, the world’s best countries… and every single year, Australia, Canada and New Zealand feature highly. This is especially true for Canada – it’s got one of the world’s best reputation’s internationally [see page 17] as a place to do business and live, with Australia and New Zealand not far behind. The countries’ cities rank highly for liveability (8 out of 10 cities in the 2014 Economist Intelligence Unit’s world’s most liveable cities were in Australia, Canada and New Zealand). All three countries feature highly in the latest world happiness report. Whereas British expats reckon they’re healthiest and wealthiest in… yep, you’ve guessed it. Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Go on, you deserve to be happy and wealthy too – make the move.

5. It’s never a good time

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So why move now, rather than next year or beyond? Because, frankly, it’s never a good time to move – you’ll always be waiting for your cousin’s wedding or for your little one to start school. Like having a baby, there is never an ideal time to move country.

So you might as well to do it now.

Convinced? Start searching for your new job and life in Australia, Canada or New Zealand.

Christchurch, New Zealand: rising from the rubble … and better than ever

Nicky Wagner MP for Christchurch CentralBy Nicky Wagner, Member of Parliament for Christchurch Central

The Christchurch rebuild, following the devastating 2010/2011 earthquakes, is the biggest economic event in New Zealand’s history. And it is well underway.

Signs of redevelopment are everywhere and the Canterbury economy is booming – growing at more than twice the rate of the rest of the country in the past year. The current National-led Government has earmarked $5.5 billion for the region’s recovery and rebuild, while latest insurance claim estimates top $30 billion. This is, on a New Zealand scale, simply immense.

As the Member of Parliament for Christchurch Central, one of this city’s most damaged areas, I am excited about the plans for Christchurch and the blueprint for the new city centre. It has involved extensive professional and community consultation and collaboration, and many anticipate the new CBD will soon become hot property because of its redesigned compact layout.

You may well have seen images of the ReStart Container Mall, with its colourful, innovative combinations and inviting atmosphere, while the recently opened central city Enterprise Precinct and Innovation Hub (EPIC) has set out to become a world class campus for innovation-based Canterbury companies.

We look forward to the redevelopment of a number of new civic assets, including a 2,000-seat convention centre, new bus interchange, the Avon river green belt and a new 35,000-seat stadium. All over the city and Canterbury region, major infrastructure repair and reconstruction is well underway.

CEO of the Canterbury Employers’ Chambers of Commerce Peter Townsend is invigorated by the huge financial possibilities in the recovery, anticipating significant involvement as the rebuild continues to gather momentum. He emphasises this is going to go on for a long time.

And given the sheer scale of the rebuild, this means we need to recruit especially skilled people, particularly geotechnical experts and engineers, construction managers and supervisors. Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Hon Gerry Brownlee says in the past year, demand for construction project managers and supervisors increased 88% and 356% respectively, such is the volume and scale of projects beginning to come on stream.

Migrant input into the rebuild is genuinely welcome. Systems are in place to meet the demand and provide for a rise in population. We want to ensure there is a long-term vision for the rebuild – that this is no boom and bust scenario. We want to sustain a growing population, a booming economy, and a thriving new city.

Christchurch is already renowned for its quality schooling, healthy family lifestyle and of course, abundant and diverse recreational opportunities within a very short drive from the city. But with the skills, people power, capital, and palpable enthusiasm pouring into the rebuild, it can only get better.

Indeed, Lonely Planet recently ranked Christchurch in the Top Ten cities for 2013, describing it as “rising from the rubble with a breath-taking mix of spirit, determination and flair”. I couldn’t agree more. We are not just rebuilding a city, we are creating something quite special. Christchurch has a vision to become one of the best modern cities of the world and we invite you to be part of it.

Find your job in Christchurch

See roles in demand in Christchurch at Working In New Zealand.

Have you got the Australian M factor?

The M factor Australia

So, you’ve given it some thought, had a chat with your nearest and dearest and watched enough episodes of Neighbours and Home & Away to have developed the required nasal twang to make you fit right into your new dream life in Australia.

Then you made the fatal error of starting the real research and, before you knew it, you were curled up in the fetal position in the front room, singing Swing Low Sweet Chariot and promising yourself you’d never stray again.

If this sounds familiar, you’re not alone. The process of migrating is huge, not just from a legislative point of view, but also logistics, costs, and perhaps most importantly, the emotional strain that it induces. There are few things in life more unsettling than living with one foot in two continents – unable to move forward in your old life and unable to put roots down in your new destination. We call this the M factor – migration ready, move ready and mightily motivated. Yes, it’s tongue-in-cheek, sure, but stay with me – there are definitely parallels to the TV show with a similar name.

Firstly, the world is full of people who think they have the M factor. For example, there are those who go at it like the proverbial bull in a china shop and then pull up at the last minute. This is after investing a significant amount of money and realising that they actually don’t have that last piece of drive to leave behind all that is familiar and comfortable in return for an uncertain future in a foreign land full of strangers. They’re like the folk who get to the auditions, all bluster and confidence, and then freeze in the wings while waiting for their turn.

Then there are those who are pushed into it by others – their partners, friends or family, who tell them repeatedly that it’s the right thing to do. But deep inside, they know that they really don’t want it and end up miserable, trapped in living out someone else’s dream.

But then there are those who are so right, and so ready, and don’t even know it. Or maybe they do know it, but just don’t know what to do with it.

That’s where working with an expert comes in. Definitely less judgmental than those on that TV show, a Registered Migration Agent will offer you sound, honest feedback on what your options are and advice on the process. The good ones will make sure that they spend time with you, understanding what you hope to achieve, what your goals are, and what your timeline expectations are, and then will put a plan in place to help you achieve those.

In some cases, you may get answers that you don’t want – but those answers might stop you making an expensive and humbling mistake. In other cases, you may get information that you hadn’t considered that put a new spin on the direction you thought you wanted to take. But in all cases, you’ll come away from the experience wiser and more knowledgeable.

Don’t take a chance on missing out on a life that you’ve always dreamed of by trying to undertake something as legally complex and emotionally challenging as an international relocation on your own.

Moving across the world – in five weeks

At Working In, we like to practise what we preach – so a lot of our team have made the move overseas themselves. Like our Web & Marketing Writer Sarah who moved from the UK to New Zealand back in 2010. This is her story.

Moving across the world in 5 weeks 2

One of the first looks at our new home, Auckland

“I got the job”. Nothing too remarkable about those four words. Until you consider that “the job” is 12,500 miles from where you’ve lived for 26 years of your life. And you’re expected there in five weeks.

That’s exactly what happened to my husband and I back in April 2010. Almost four great years had passed in Leeds (Yorkshire, England) but we were yearning for more. More adventure, more challenges, more opportunities and maybe even more sunshine.

For a few weeks, my husband had been keeping an eye on his professional publications (he’s a civil engineer) for job opportunities. There it was – a bridge engineer vacancy based in Auckland, New Zealand. A country we’d never visited, had no friends or family in and somewhere I’d struggle to pick out on a map.

Yet we knew people that had been there and had absolutely fallen in love with it. We wanted a new adventure – well, here it was. He applied for the job and enjoyed a late night Skype interview while I slept. That very night I was woken up by a shell-shocked husband telling me he’d got the job and we were moving to New Zealand.

The morning after, the countdown began. Five weeks to go until we’d land in our new home in a brand new country – and start our brand new life.

Suddenly, life was a whirlwind of lists and endless phone calls as we tried to pack up our UK lives and prepare for a New Zealand one.

There was our flat that needed to be rented out. Banks and utility companies to inform. Tax arrangements and student loans to discuss. Jobs to resign from. Flights to book, visas to sort and shipping to organise. Then the hardest bit: friends and family to say goodbye to.

At no point during these five weeks did our feet touch the ground. There was no time for tears, doubts or wobbles – just endless lists and admin.

Standing in our now empty hallway, our possessions in a few meagre cardboard boxes that we’d next see in three months’ time on the other side of a world, and the rest packed off to storage for the foreseeable future, we knew we weren’t saying goodbye.

We were just saying hello to the adventure of a lifetime.

That’s exactly what I felt as we flew into Auckland for the first time and our first glimpses of Aotearoa filled the airplane windows. Three years on, we have no regrets about our life-changing five weeks – it was the best decision we’ve ever made and we haven’t looked back since.

Have you packed up your life and moved to a new country? Share your story!

And the relaxed summer way of life too

Embracing the relaxed summer way of life 

Embracing the Kiwi adventurous way of life

And the Kiwi adventurous way of life too

Lining up to help rebuild Christchurch

Our Opportunities Overseas Expo UK and Ireland November 2012 roadshow is on the road!

Last weekend we were in London where hundreds of people attended, looking for their new job – and for some, their chance to rebuild Christchurch, New Zealand.

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Check out 3 News’ report of the busy expo.

We’ll be in Dublin (13 November) and Aberdeen (15 November), before finishing up in Manchester (17-18 November) – hope to see you there!

“I’m skilled and want to move country – what next?”

Plane flying over green grass against a blue backgroundHere, Caren, one of Working In’s migration consultants, recounts a real-life story as experienced by a colleague in the office as they planned their journey from the UK to New Zealand. See if you can use any of their helpful hints in planning your own move:

“We knew we wanted to move from the UK, but where to was the big question! So we decided to buy a round-the-world ticket and took ourselves off to Australia and New Zealand on a six-week ‘look-see’ holiday. This ticket allowed us to fly to several cities in both countries. We very quickly came to decide on New Zealand as we loved both the lifestyle it could offer us and the culture of the people. In fact, it felt very similar to what we were used to.

The first sign that we were really serious about this was when I walked into WH Smith and bought a book on New Zealand. After reading it cover to cover, we targeted a few areas that looked interesting.

Having done extensive homework prior to getting on the plane, we knew exactly what we wanted to see and check out for ourselves. We had shortlisted a few cities in New Zealand, and even done our homework with regards to the best schools and suburbs in those cities. This allowed us to drive past these schools and drive around these suburbs during our fleeting visit. We picked up as many real estate magazines as we could and soon the Property Press became the most read magazine in our house! We even went through a few open homes to get an understanding of what we could and couldn’t afford. When we visited a town/city on our shortlist, we made sure that we stayed for a few days, interacted with the locals and spent many hours picnicking at the local parks and beaches. This gave us a small taste of the culture and types of people in the town.

We were lucky enough to have friends in New Zealand who were able to give us their feelings and experiences about life in New Zealand. They also gave us an up to date household budget so that we could effectively compare it to how we lived at home. This gave us a good indication that our quality of life would significantly improve in New Zealand, as we would be in a position to afford a bigger home, live near good schools and have the means to enjoy life.

When we got back home, we had a renewed desire and determination to get our relocation underway. We put our house on the market, told our friends and family and started our immigration application process. We were lucky enough to have an occupation on the Long Term Skills Shortage List and could apply for residence without a job offer. Many friends thought that moving to a strange country on the other side of the world without a job offer was completely mad! But we never waivered from our plans and pushed on regardless.

We also spent a day in London at an expo called Opportunities New Zealand [what our early Opportunities Overseas Expos were called]. We were surprised by how many other people (like us) were on the same mission! This was an amazing experience as we managed to find a lot of information all under one roof.

I bought a book called ‘Where to Live in Auckland’ at the expo, which turned out to be one of the best buys regarding New Zealand. It became like my ‘New Zealand bible’ as it describes everything there is to know about each suburb, including who lives there, what schools are in the suburb, what the median price is for houses, what streets you want to avoid, etc. – invaluable if you are thinking of living in Auckland! If anything, the most we got out of our trip to London was that we were not alone on this quest to find a better life.”

Canada, Australia and New Zealand in the news

Possum in a brick shed

Watch out for the power cable climbing possums in New Zealand

Here’s the latest news – with an industry and immigration focus where possible – from Canada, Australia and New Zealand:

Canada: skill shortages and immigration

A lot of Canadian news has been about their critical skill shortages, being felt by a range of industries. For example, in British Columbia they’re enjoying plenty of shipbuilding contracts, new liquefied natural gas plants and a booming mining sector. All great – apart from the fact there won’t be enough trained workers to fill the expected jobs surge.

According to Canadian Business:

“The government is projecting that among the one million job openings expected by 2020, 43 per cent will require skilled workers. It predicts there will be a gap of 22,000 to 32,000 people in northern B.C. [British Columbia] alone.”

These fears have been echoed on a national level with the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development, Diane Finley, taking the stage at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce’s Annual General Meeting to deliver a keynote speech about how to tackle Canada’s skills and labour crisis.

As part of a government initiative to discover the Top 10 barriers to Canadian Competitiveness came four key priorities identified by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. One of these priorities should be immigration – and specifically “ensuring immigration policy is aligned with local labour markets and employers’ needs”.

Read the full Top 10 barriers to Canadian Competitiveness report here.

Australia: positivity in jobs and migration

Coming off the back of the good news that Australian job vacancies have risen 4.2% in August 2012 was a report released by the International Monetary Fund showing that flexibility in the workforce will help Australia to ride out other global economic storms.

The report also identifies that temporary and permanent skilled migration will be vital so that workers can move across regions and industries:

“Their ability to do so will again be tested when investment in the resources sector comes off its peak and some labour currently employed there is to be absorbed by the rest of the economy.”

The full report can be viewed here.

New Zealand: pies and possums

It’s been a light-hearted news week in New Zealand, with a couple of ‘only in New Zealand’ moments.

This includes a pie-lover on a mission to restore a classic piece of the Kiwi culinary scene – the Georgie Pie. Apparently these tasty delicacies are unlikely to comply with today’s standards for fat and salt content. See the New Zealand Herald for more.

The culprit of a blackout across Gisborne in New Zealand’s north island has been found – a possum inadvertently climbing a power pylon. Makes a change from someone accidentally cutting through a cable at least…

Top 10 strangest laws in Australia, Canada and New Zealand

Rooster on a porch

Make sure you keep your rooster firmly on the ground in New Zealand

The Queen has had a bit of a big year – she celebrated 60 years on the throne and even skydived into the Olympics opening ceremony with James Bond. She’s also the Queen of all the three countries we work with – Australia, Canada and New Zealand. So it’s the perfect time to look at some of the craziest, hard-to-believe and downright silly laws.

In Australia…

1. It is illegal to wear hot pink pants after midday Sunday.
2. You must have a neck to knee swimsuit in order to swim at Brighton Beach.
3. Bars are required to stable, water and feed the horses of their patrons.

In Canada…

4. Every 5th song on the radio must be by a Canadian born citizen.
5. It is illegal to eat ice-cream on Ottawa’s Bank Street on a Sunday.
6. In Wawa, you may not paint a ladder as it will be slippery when wet.

In New Zealand…

7. If you find uranium, you must report it – in writing – to the Government within three months.
8. It’s illegal to fly with a rooster in a hot air balloon.
9. Every high school may hold one pound of uranium and one pound of thorium, for conducting nuclear experiments (however, there is a fine of $1 million for letting off nuclear explosions).

And the final one from the motherland, in the UK…

10. It is illegal to die in the Houses of Parliament.

In your opinion…

What’s the silliest law in your homeland?

Gannets, Kiwis and Fly In Fly Out (FIFO)

Our Marketing Manager Julie takes a quirky look at the Fly In Fly Out (FIFO) mining job opportunities and what they have in common with the local bird life:

Gannet flying against a blue sky next to a model of a Kiwi bird on a white background

What is the difference between a gannet, a kiwi and FIFO?

Two are high fliers, and the other is a flightless native bird.

Well, to be totally factual, the dear kiwi has no real choices on being grounded, coupled with being an endangered species treasured by New Zealanders. Now the gannet is a whole other story, having the freedom to fly around the world, eking out a living, meeting up with old friends and making new ones.

Then there’s FIFO (a.k.a. fly in fly out) which is not a feathered bird (but let’s not forget that flight is the operative word here) but best known by miners and mining companies who bid for miners then fly them out to billion dollar mining projects. So, miners and gannets both share a common goal – of making a living involving the move from one country to another.

Miners’ specialisation, skills and motivation to move to other countries means they have opportunities galore to live and learn new cultures, and can potentially earn a good living to support themselves and their families.

Did you know?

  • Mining companies will make bids to attract miners
  • There are great locations in Western Australia and Latin America
  • Accommodation and meals are provided in comfortable environments
  • You have the chance to go home on a regular basis

Now getting back to the moral of story, you may see there are a few parallels between our gannet and the FIFO miner, while the kiwi bird is clearly a rank outsider with no ability to take flight. Unlike you – so visit our website and check out those hot jobs and start your FIFO missions – what are you waiting for?

Australia, Canada & New Zealand in the news – Sept 10-17th

Minister Kenney congratulates Gaurav Gore, Canada’s 20,000th permanent resident through the Canadian Experience Class (CEC)

Minister Kenney congratulates Gaurav Gore, Canada’s 20,000th permanent resident through the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) – Ottawa, Ontario

Keep up to date with the latest news from Australia, Canada and New Zealand:

Canada: new visa designed for entrepreneurs plus Canadian Experience Class success

In the wake of Canada’s immigration policy changes, they’re still busy beavering away with further changes and improvements, this time by introducing the startup visa – aimed at immigrant entrepreneurs.

The idea behind it is that venture investment funds would choose entrepreneurs to invest in who the government would then try to clear for entry into Canada within weeks – the perfect marriage of Canadian money and foreign brains.

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney’s press secretary Alexis Pavlich says:

“This program will link brilliant, job-creating, immigrant entrepreneurs with Canadian investors. We want the world’s best and brightest to come to Canada – to start businesses and to create jobs in Canada.”

The Globe and Mail has the full story.

In a related story, Canada has welcomed its 20,000th permanent resident through the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) stream. The CEC stream is Canada’s fastest growing economic immigration program, offering a pathway to permanent residency for international student graduates and others with skilled work experience in Canada. Read more at Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

New Zealand: being Kiwi

New Zealand’s national paper, The New Zealand Herald, has undergone a makeover to a new, compact format. To celebrate, they launched a week-long series about what it means to be a Kiwi these days. It makes pretty interesting reading for anyone planning on making the move.

It kicked off with an article about what it means to be a Kiwi, especially now that almost a quarter of NZ residents are overseas-born, rising to almost 40 per cent in Auckland. Words like “sporty”, “outdoors”, “adventurous” and “friendly” all popped up when describing Kiwis.

Another article explained that nearly one in four people in New Zealand today were born overseas – in 2010 it came tenth in a list of countries with foreign-born populations. Yet the article explained how new arrivals to NZ can struggle between identifying with their adopted home and their place of birth.

The waves of British expats heading to New Zealand in the 1960s and 70s have now grown up and are having their say about why they moved to New Zealand and how being a migrant has shaped their life experiences. Like many would-be migrants these days, some were driven by ‘wanting a better life for our children’.

Over in Australia…

The news coming out of Oz is still heavily dominated by the mining boom with articles weighing in one side or the other. At least the Manpower Employment Outlook Survey shows the employment outlook for the mining and construction sector in the coming quarter is up 10 per cent. The full detailed report can be viewed here.

Canada prepares to open its doors again

Brown moose against forest background

Could you meet the moose in Canada?

Earlier this year, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) announced a temporary pause to its Federal Skilled Worker program while they reviewed the selection criteria to ensure a faster, more efficient immigration system.

Since then, they’ve been busy running consultations with the public, businesses and local stakeholders to get their input into proposed changes.
Finally, on 17 August, Citizenship and Immigration Canada unveiled their proposed changes, designed to allow Canada to better select workers who can “hit the ground running” upon arrival.

So what’s changed?*

Applicants under the Federal Skilled Worker Program are assessed against a points grid which awards a maximum of 100 points. The pass mark is 67 points. The following changes to the points grid are proposed:

Language

Language is now the most important factor on the grid – the weight of the first official language would be significantly increased from 16 to 24 points while the weight of the second official language would be reduced from eight to four points.

Age

The proposal will favour younger applicants by awarding a maximum of 12 points (currently the maximum is 10 points) for applicants aged 18 to 35, but reducing one point for every year after 35.

Work experience

The total number of points for work experience will decrease from 21 to 15, yet to achieve full points for work experience, they’ve increased the years of experience required. Previously it was four years, it will now be six years.

Education

Education points will be awarded based on an assessment of foreign education credentials and what the Canadian equivalent would be. CIC will not accept credentials that don’t exist in Canada or ones that aren’t comparable to a completed Canadian credential. The maximum points available will remain at 25.

Adaptability

The proposal will change the adaptability criteria to emphasise factors that are shown to have positive impacts on an immigrant’s economic and social integration. This includes points being awarded for spousal language ability and previous Canadian work experience.

Next steps

Final publication of the new (and hopefully improved) Federal Skilled Worker Program is scheduled for late 2012 while the new FSWP points grid is due to take effect in January 2013. Applications are expected to be accepted again in early 2013. You can read the whole text of the proposed changes at the Canada Gazette.

*Bear in mind that this is just a proposal and may be still subject to change.

In the news: Australia, New Zealand and Canada

Letters of the alphabet cut out and pinned to a notice boardHave a look at how Australia, New Zealand and Canada have been making the news this week:

Why highly educated immigrant parents choose Canada

For anyone thinking about a move overseas, you might consider the work opportunities or the lifestyle the country offers – this article from the Globe and Mail shows how some parents make the move based on the educational chances offered to their children. Not surprisingly, as this article explains:

“Immigrant students in this country [Canada] outperform their native-born peers.

They post stronger scores on standardized math and science tests and are more likely to go on to postsecondary education. The same does not hold true for immigrants to other countries, including the United States and the United Kingdom.”

Rebuilding Christchurch

More than a year on from the Christchurch earthquake, in which around 60% of the historic city centre was damaged, Christchurch is still working hard to rebuild – even as it’s been rocked by more than 11,200 aftershocks since the very first earthquake struck in September 2010. Watch Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee talk about the challenges of rebuilding Christchurch in the wake of criticism about the slow pace of recovery. See how Christchurch looked in February 2012 with this BBC News article.

Demand for skilled workers grows in Australia

The Clarius Skills Index, released on 3 September, shows that the demand for skilled workers has risen to its highest level in 12 months, with a shortage of 2,300 skilled positions. Additionally, “the index, based on 20 occupations representing 2.6 million skilled Australian workers, found nine occupations were in shortage – an increase from two in the previous quarter”. The most in demand workers were engineers. Read the full article on The Australian.

Flight attendants confess

Anyone considering the long flight across the world to Canada, New Zealand or Australia may be interested to hear flight attendants’ top tips to stop passengers annoying them.

Australia mining: boom or bust?

Mining truck on the red sands of Australia against a blue skyThe Australian mining boom has dominated the press lately, both in the southern hemisphere and on a global level, polarising opinion over whether it really is booming or is bust. Having enjoyed an unprecedented surge of success, reflected in high salaries, a thriving economy and towns springing up to accommodate the high volumes of workers, fears are growing (or perhaps just media coverage) that Australia’s mining boom is slowing down. Here’s a look at what’s been in the news:

The mining bubble has burst…

It all seemed to kick off when Resources Minister Martin Ferguson announced that “You’ve got to understand the resources boom is over” – a bold statement that opened the floodgates to a rush of similar comments and fears.

The mining bubble is booming…

Yet, on the back of this came comments from Australia’s central bank chief saying there’s no sign the mining boom is over and that the resource-rich economy was growing at its potential (as reported by Reuters). This was swiftly followed up by Treasurer Wayne Swan assuring reporters that Australia still has a resources investment pipeline of half a trillion dollars and “That pipeline will be there creating wealth and in the future creating exports for Australia and we will see an export boom following this investment boom”. Business spending plans appeared to back this statement up.

So what’s going on?

Media around the world has been keen to weigh in with their thoughts, from the BBC to The Age. The opinion pieces show cautious optimism for the long-term impact of the resources projects planned in Australia – highlighting how it’s not all doom and gloom in Australia. If you’re interesting in finding out more, The Herald Sun has done a great breakdown of what’s happening with Australia’s mining boom.

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