Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘Jobs in Australia’

The Skills in High Demand in Australia

Whether it’s calling one of the world’s most liveable cities home (hello Melbourne), exploring some of the most famous skylines (hi Sydney) or losing yourself (not literally we hope) in the stunning job opportunities in the outback, Australia offers a lot to potential new Aussies.

If you’ve got the skills and experience Australia needs then you could be moving, living, working and playing there soon. See if your skills are in demand in Australia.

Sydney Harbour

About the Skilled Occupation List (SOL)

The SOL is updated regularly to reflect the changing needs of Australia. You need to nominate an occupation on the SOL if you’re applying for:

  • Independent points-based skilled migration and you’re not nominated by a state or territory government agency – this is SkillSelect
  • A Family Sponsored Points Tested visa
  • A Temporary Graduate visa (subclass 485) – Graduate Work stream

About SkillSelect

SkillSelect is how Australia chooses which applicants to invite to apply for a visa. To apply you submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) online. You’ll then go into a pool of other applicants where you’ll be ranked on things like your work experience, skills, age and language abilities.

Depending on your ranking in the pool of applicants, you may then be invited to apply for a visa.

Find out more about SkillSelect.

The skills on the SOL

There are currently 191 occupations on the SOL. If you need a skills assessment as part of your visa application, you need to contact the assessing authority directly to get this. They will provide all the necessary forms and information you need and there will be a cost for this.

View the SOL, along with details of the relevant assessing authorities.

The Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List (CSOL)

If you’re applying for a visa under these programs:

  • Points-based skilled migration and you’re nominated by a state or territory government agency under a State Migration Plan
  • The Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS), and you’ve been nominated by an Australian employer to fill a position in an occupation that appears in the CSOL
  • The Temporary Work (Skilled) visa – subclass 457
  • The Training and Research visa (subclass 402)

You need to find your occupation on the CSOL, not the SOL.

View the current CSOL.

Get help with your Australian visa

To help you through the Australian visa process, you can:

You can also start searching for your new job today – good luck!

Gannets, Kiwis and Fly In Fly Out (FIFO)

Our Marketing Manager Julie takes a quirky look at the Fly In Fly Out (FIFO) mining job opportunities and what they have in common with the local bird life:

Gannet flying against a blue sky next to a model of a Kiwi bird on a white background

What is the difference between a gannet, a kiwi and FIFO?

Two are high fliers, and the other is a flightless native bird.

Well, to be totally factual, the dear kiwi has no real choices on being grounded, coupled with being an endangered species treasured by New Zealanders. Now the gannet is a whole other story, having the freedom to fly around the world, eking out a living, meeting up with old friends and making new ones.

Then there’s FIFO (a.k.a. fly in fly out) which is not a feathered bird (but let’s not forget that flight is the operative word here) but best known by miners and mining companies who bid for miners then fly them out to billion dollar mining projects. So, miners and gannets both share a common goal – of making a living involving the move from one country to another.

Miners’ specialisation, skills and motivation to move to other countries means they have opportunities galore to live and learn new cultures, and can potentially earn a good living to support themselves and their families.

Did you know?

  • Mining companies will make bids to attract miners
  • There are great locations in Western Australia and Latin America
  • Accommodation and meals are provided in comfortable environments
  • You have the chance to go home on a regular basis

Now getting back to the moral of story, you may see there are a few parallels between our gannet and the FIFO miner, while the kiwi bird is clearly a rank outsider with no ability to take flight. Unlike you – so visit our website and check out those hot jobs and start your FIFO missions – what are you waiting for?

Top five tips to tailor your CV for Australia

Close up of a fountain pen nib against a white backgroundAs with any job search anywhere in the world, the vital thing is to write your CV in the style and format of the market you are applying to – not the market you’ve come from. Here are five things you need to watch out for:

1. Don’t forget your contact details

Name, phone number, postal and email address. You would be amazed how often these details are overlooked.

2. Keep it concise and to the point

Ask yourself – what do I do for a living? If you’re an engineer, for example, that should be the first thing on your CV. Aussies are a straightforward bunch and they like to know what you do and if you will be a good fit for the job they are advertising. A great way to construct your CV is to look at the advertisement and address some of its requirements up front. If they are looking for someone with a qualification and 5+ years experience, make sure your length of experience and qualification are on the first page of your CV and not buried further on.

3. Watch the length – about four pages is the norm

The broadly accepted UK standard is two pages, no more, while a typical South African CV can be anything up to 30 pages long and include a wealth of detailed information. The general rule down under is somewhere in between. Generally, we would not expect to see more than four pages, but as long as you are including concise and relevant information, it does not matter how long it is (within reason).

4. Keep it simple

Try and remember that while a flashing yellow border might be right up your alley, it may not be the personal preference of those reading your CV. Steer clear of fancy fonts and pictures (unless it is relevant to your application – all you aspiring models out there!).

5. Check the spelling and have a friend proofread it

Check, double check and then get someone else to check your spelling, punctuation and grammar. It can be very off-putting to read a CV with easily fixable spelling mistakes. Microsoft Word automatically picks up on spelling errors, which stand out like a beacon. Keeping your CV objective and relevant can be quite tricky. If you have someone able to give you honest, constructive feedback, use them. It is better to hear from a friend that something is not relevant or does not make sense than from a potential hiring manager.

Happy writing!

What is FIFO?

Fly in Fly Out – or FIFO as it is more commonly referred to – is a method of employing people for remote country locations which is very commonly used in Western Australia. As an alternative to relocating entire families to often remote locations, the employee is flown to the work site for a number of days, and then flown home again.

Why FIFO?

Employers prefer their workers to be FIFO as the cost of transporting employees to site is far less than it would be to build, maintain and develop long term communities. Employees may prefer the FIFO opportunity as their families are often reluctant to relocate to small towns in remote areas.

What should I expect?

Mine Workers in Bengalla

Mine Workers in Australia

Rosters dictate how long you are on site, and how long you are home. Most rosters offered are 4 weeks on site and 1 week at home – 4:1 however these rosters vary depending on the project and the site.

Usually a FIFO position involves working a shift of 10 hours each day for a number of continuous days. When on site, you will be supplied with all meals, accommodation, house-keeping – some camps also offer swimming pools, tennis courts, gyms, cable TV and unlimited internet as a way of attracting and retaining skilled staff.

Read on for more on what’s driving the industry here in Australia and how you can get your FIFO job:

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Could Australian heavy construction projects be the opportunity you are looking for?

Newman Hub Conveyors

Conveyors at the Newman Hub processing centre

Australia currently has tremendous job opportunities on some the biggest heavy construction projects wordlwide.

Within the construction industry the term “heavy” refers to items produced such as iron ore, coal, oil and gas etc. Owners of heavy construction projects are usually large, for-profit, industrial corporations. These corporations can be found in such industries as Infrastructure, power transmission and distribution, metallurgical and material handling, oil and gas, chemical, power generation, mineral processing etc.

Heavy construction projects require a team of qualified individuals to ensure successful project completion. Specifically, in the fields of mechanical and structural engineering, project management, construction management, quality surveying, Health Safety & Environmental and quality assurance management. In Australia majority of heavy construction projects are located in regional areas ‘outback Australia’ therefore, fly in and fly out (FIFO) rosters have been adopted as a method of employment.

Read on for details on some of the biggest current projects here in Australia:
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How to get reliable immigration advice

Hi Everyone

This week, we have some great tips for helping you to find reliable visa and immigration advice. If you’re serious about moving country, one of the best things you can do for yourself is to get a reputable immigration adviser. Why? You’ve all heard the saying a stitch in time saves nine, and this is one case where it’s certainly true!

Why use an immigration adviser?

  • An immigration adviser will give you a realistic idea of your chances of success right from the word go. Of course, your eligibility will depend on your individual circumstances, including factors such as your age, work experience, skills and language ability.
  • If you are eligible, you’ll be told what immigration pathways are available and which one is going to work best for you. You won’t waste time and money heading down the wrong path then having to do a ‘u-turn’ later on.
  • You get the bonus of expert advice to sort out any hitches along the way. Immigration law can be a difficult beastie at the best of times and it’s constantly changing, so up-to-date advice not only smooths out the snags en route, it helps prevent them in the first place!

How can I pick a reliable immigration adviser?

  • Choose someone who is licensed or registered. Legitimate advisers and agents are regulated by a professional body which helps ensure that they are competent. While it won’t necessarily guarantee you professional service, it will go a long way to weeding out ‘cowboy’ outfits! In New Zealand, agents are called licensed immigration advisers, and they are regulated by the Immigration Advisers Authority (IAA); in Australia, they are called registered  migration agents and they are regulated by MARA; and in Canada, they are called immigration consultants and they are regulated by the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC).
  • Ensure that their membership is current. If a licensed agent or business has been investigated for failing to provide a professional service, their licence will have been cancelled. Make a quick call to the regulatory body first to make sure they are still legit before you hand over any money!
  • Check out their credentials. You wouldn’t rent out your house or employ someone without checking their references, so ask if you can speak to a recent client, and check out the agency online too (web, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn). A reputable company will have a professional online presence with a history that can be tracked. If you have friends who’ve already migrated, ask them who they used and what their experience was, or visit ex-pat forums and get recommendations that way. This kind of research takes a bit of extra effort, but it pays off in the long run!

What next?

  • Read up about the immigration categories for New Zealand, Australia and Canada so you know what to expect.
  • If you’re considering emigrating as a skilled migrant, take Working In’s free online visa assessment to have see if you have the right skills to move to Australia or New Zealand. This will help you to determine if it’s worthwhile proceeding.
  • Visit our visa sections for Australia, New Zealand and Canada. There’s loads of info here, including more about visa categories and policy, and reputable advisers in Australia, NZ and Canada who can help you with your move.

Come and see us in person in the UK in June/July!
We have immigration advisers and migration agents attending our Opportunities Overseas Expos to help you with your migration questions so, if you are relocating, make sure you come along to an expo near you! We’ll be in in the UK in Leeds on 30 June-1 July, and in London on 7-8 July, and we’ll have some great job opportunities as well.

Hope to see you there!

Skill shortages in Oz & NZ

Hi again!

Great to see so many of you (9,210 altogether!) visiting us at our Opportunities Overseas Expos in London and Manchester last month, and at our Energy, Mining & Engineering expo in Aberdeen. There’s lots of great talent out there, and many of you who came along are now going through the recruitment process and getting ready for the next exciting step of your journey.

Next up, we’ll be bringing employers from NZ, Australia and Peru to Canada for the Energy, Mining & Engineering International Jobs Expo in May, so what better time to look at the areas of skill shortage, and find out just who’s in demand at the moment.

The Aussie mining boom
Everyone’s heard about the mining boom in Aussie, so it’s no surprise to find that main areas of skill shortage are connected to the mining and oil & gas sector. With a whopping US$229 billion (AU$232 billion) of committed gas projects in the pipeline, Australia has a critical shortage of experienced engineers, tradespeople and construction workers to staff up its raft of mega projects.

Calling all Senior Engineers!
Engineering shortages are biting especially hard, as major mining projects, including the massive AU$43 billion Gorgon project, exhaust the local labour supply. Australia’s national engineering body, Engineers Australia, has predicted that the country’s engineering workforce will need to double just to keep pace with the rapid development, so if you have engineering skills – especially at a senior level – you’ll be very much in demand!

Some of the roles that Aussie employers are recruiting for in Canada include well, reservoir & petroleum engineers; principal, civil, mechanical & process engineers; drilling supervisors; hydrologists; project directors and managers; health & safety managers and engineering managers.

Other energy/infrastructure specialists in demand include transmission line practitioners, waste water and water planning engineers,  site supervisors, environmental advisors and senior planners

Skill shortages in New Zealand
In New Zealand, the skills shortages may not be quite as intense, but the country’s growing energy sector is still short of skilled professionals, with mining specialists, engineers and geologists high on the list of those most in demand. The Christchurch rebuild is also putting the squeeze on the labour market, with engineers and skilled trades already in demand – a shortfall of up to 30,000 workers has already been forecast during the 10-20 year rebuild period.

Some of the roles that NZ employers are recruiting for at the Canada expos include mining, petroleum, geotechnical & field engineers; technical services and production superintendents; and exploration & mine geologists. Within the energy/power sector, there are roles for project engineers & managers, power system analysts, electrical network engineers, electricity asset managers, engineering analysts and substation design engineers.

Come & see us in Canada
So, if you’re in Canada, and you’re working in the oil & gas, energy, engineering or infrastructure sectors, come along and check out the jobs available in Oz & NZ (we’ll also have some jobs in Peru – again, mining-related roles including heavy diesel mechanics and truck operators!). 

We’ll be touching down in the three Canadian cities in 2012: Calgary (5-6 May) at the Calgary TELUS Convention Centre; Vancouver (9 May) at the Hyatt Regency and Edmonton (12-13 May) at the Mayfield Inn & Suites.

Where to book
You can find out more about companies attending and the roles being recruited for at:
www.workingin.com/eme

CALGARY | BOOK NOW
VANCOUVER | BOOK NOW
EDMONTON | BOOK NOW

Hope to see you there!

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