Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘lifestyle’

The Top 10 Best Reasons to Move to Australia (the June 2015 list)

Last week we posted some fantastic reasons why you should definitely move to New Zealand.  But if you have your heart set on moving to Australia, you’re in luck because we have written a Top 10 list for Australia as well!

So here’s our Top 10 Best Reasons to Move to Australia list – compiled by the staff here at Working In, especially for this blog.

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lifeguard

Reason #1 – Employment Prospects

Australia has good job prospects, over most industries.  Here’s a great place to start searching for your new job Down Under:  http://www.workingin-australia.com/jobs 

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CampingTips2-450x337

Reason #2 – Lifestyle

People living in Australia generally have a good work/life balance – that means more time for yourself, and more time with your family.  T

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generic beach AU Reason #3 – Climate

Australia’s climate has to be one of the best in the world.  Queensland is known as The Sunshine State because of its approx. 300 days of sunshine per year.

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multicultural australia Reason #4 – Society

You’ll find Australia is one of the most multicultural nations on Earth.

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Reason #5 – Nature

You can be close to water, the city and the bush in nearly every inhabited location in the country.

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Xmas AU Reason #6 – Opposite Seasons

You get to have Christmas on the Beach!  You don’t need snow to have Christmas .. it can be just as magical in the sunshine.

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bunyip

Reason #7 – Culture

Has some of the best slang words ever invented. Do you know what Ankle Biter, Rip Snorter, or Bunyip mean?*

(Don’t worry, we’ve given you the answers at the end of the blog post)

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melb Reason #8 – And more culture!

The food, wine and coffee are some of the best in the world. Australians really take pride in these – check out The Coffee Experience in Sydney this September, or why not take a Self-Guided Tour of the Barossa Valley?

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adventure collage 2Reason #9 – There are things to do

There are so many things to do in Australia – whether you like relaxing, adventure, or family fun, there’s something for everyone.

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tree

Reason #10 – Because you have always wanted to live and work in Australia..

..and why shouldn’t you?

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We hope our list helps you with your decision to move to Australia.

There will never be a ‘right time’ to move country, so don’t spend your life waiting for that moment to come along. Make it happen for yourself!

All the best,

Working In Team

* Wondering what those words mean?  Child / something fantastic / a mythical Outback creature

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Dads down under & other differences between the UK, NZ, Oz & Canada

This weekend, dads around New Zealand and Australia are preparing to be spoilt – Kiwis and Aussies celebrate Father’s Day on the first Sunday in September (might be a bit of a problem if your UK-based dad is used to getting Father’s Day love on the third Sunday in June).

So, what other things might you have to get used to if you swap a home in the UK for life in New Zealand, Australia and Canada?

Public holidays

You can wave goodbye to your UK spring and summer bank holidays – but move to New Zealand and you gain Waitangi Day, Anzac Day and Labour Day while certain areas of Australia enjoy Labour Day and Melbourne Cup Day too. Not forgetting that New Zealand and Australia are patriotic too – they even get Queen’s Birthday as a public holiday. Canada doesn’t do badly either with Canada Day, Labour Day and Thanksgiving Day.

‘isms’

By that we mean the little dialect differences between the countries. In the UK and Canada, every summer you drag out your flip-flops. In Australia, it’s your thongs (conjuring up all kinds of potentially embarrassing situations) and in NZ it’s your jandals. Should someone compliment you on your pants in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, they haven’t suddenly developed x-ray vision and you haven’t had an acute attack of forgetfulness – that’s their equivalent of trousers. While we’re on it, pack your gum boots for life down under (Wellington boots) and your runners for Canada (trainers). A pair of orange flip flops stuck into a beach

The seasons

Luckily, Canada’s in the northern hemisphere too so it’s easy to adjust to summer in June-August and winter in November-February. However, head down under and prepare to get Christmas on the beach and when you’d traditionally be enjoying some summer sunshine in the UK, to be embracing winter sports in Australia and New Zealand instead.

Time difference – or how not to annoy your mum

Judging by the phone in your pocket, bag or lovingly placed on the table in-front of you, you like to be connected. But catching your first midday wave in Oz or trying your first eggs bene brekkie in NZ is not the time to call your nearest and dearest back in the UK – unless you fancy rousing them from their slumber that is. However, if you come across your first moose in Canada you don’t have to wait too long to let your mum know – it’s only a four or five hour time difference.

Over to you

If you moved overseas, what do you reckon you’d miss most about home?

Canadian cities in world domination

Girl jumping with the Canadian flag against backdrop of blue skyNot only does it have Mounties, maple syrup and free-roaming bears, Canada’s now got another reason to be smug – three of its cities make up the world’s top five most liveable cities.

Dominating the top of The Economist magazine’s 2012 list were Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary. The survey ranks 140 cities based on a number of important factors, like health care, stability, culture and environment, education and infrastructure. The maximum score a city could receive was 100.

So how did Canada fare?

Well, Vancouver was the highest-ranked Canadian city, taking the third spot with a score of 97.3. Close on its heels was Toronto in fourth with a score of 97.2, followed up by Calgary in fifth place (tied with Adelaide in Australia) with 96.6.

With its reputation for an outdoorsy lifestyle, welcoming and friendly people and jaw-dropping natural landscape, it’s not really surprising Canada can compete on a global scale.

The full list

According to The Economist, the top 10 most liveable cities 2012 are:
1. Melbourne, Australia
2. Vienna, Austria
3. Vancouver
4. Toronto
5. (tie) Calgary and Adelaide, Australia
7. Sydney, Australia
8. Helsinki, Finland
9. Perth, Australia
10. Auckland, New Zealand

Over to you

What do you think – do you agree with this list? Are there cities you think should be in the top 10?

Where have we been?

Hi Everyone,

sorry it has been so long since our last post but as you know we were over in the UK at our Expos in Leeds and London and the interest was even higher than expected. Over 5000 people attended and we were flat out busy. Jenny and I are now back safely in the New Zealand office (well, actually Jenny is taking a well deserved break in Fiji) and I just wanted to let you know how things have moved on already for some of the people we met at the expo.

The employers and recruiters who flew over from Australia and New Zealand were all really pleased with the quality of the people they met in the UK. Many have already offered jobs to the people they met who are ready to move and they are busy following up on the hundreds of others whose skills are needed.

The key thing to remember here is that when you come to an expo the exhibitors will be talking to a lot of people and they will be focusing very closely on those people who are ready to make the move. Coming to the expos and being able to show how committed you are will put you ahead of the others who are researching the move. Although employers and recruiters have flown thousands of miles to meet you they are still looking for the best quality people who are committed to making the move.

Of course we have lots of people who come along to the expos because they are researching the move and they want to know the best way to proceed. I personally met thousands of people who attended our working in seminars on Australia and New Zealand and hopefully got to speak to most of you. If you are not sure of the best way for you and your family to migrate then the best thing to do at the expo is sign up for our migration map and hundreds of people did this and we are now busy having consultations with these people giving them all the information they need to be able to proceed and that information is tailored to them and their circumstances.

Of course it’s not all work and it was good to spend some time in Leeds as I hadn’t been there in years and any down time in London is always fun. There is a lot of meeting and mingling with all the exhibitors at these events and this is where we have a unique position compared to other immigration companies. Not only do we organise the expos but we also exhibit at them and build relationships with all the other exhibitors and are in constant touch with them making those relationships work for our visa clients.

So if you did come along to the expo I would love to hear from you so please leave a comment. We are already getting busy organising our Canadian, South Africa and next round of UK expos due to take place in November.

I’ll be giving you some insider tips on how to make the most of the expo and even running some competitions so you can win some free tickets so do interact with us on this blog and we will respond to all comments.

We aim to blog more frequently (well when Jen gets back from FIJI, can you tell I’m jealous) so do keep checking in and tell your friends.

For those of you looking for jobs in New Zealand or Australia here are some handy tips to help you on your way.

A Positive attitude – You need to come across to employers as committed to the move with an upbeat positive flexible attitude. If you can also show commitment to the move by visits you have made to Australia or New Zealand or show engagement with a company such as workingin visas this can also add to your appeal

A Good CV – It is very important to have your CV formatted in a way that suits the employers. This could be very different to how you currently format your CV. Grammar and spelling is crucial and your CV should be tailored to each application

Understand your potential employer – Read the job description carefully. What are they looking for? Who are they and what do they do? You need to do as much research as possible before applying

Be Proactive – Follow up your job applications with phone calls as well as emails. Phone calls show motivation and are the best way to make contact. Keep track of your applications and even follow up the rejections with a request for feedback.

Know your timeframes – This is essential. Do not apply for jobs unless you are able to move. Some employers will wait months but most will want you to start work ASAP.

Leave your comments we want to hear from you

Ka Kite (bye for now)

Paul Goddard

IAA license 201001948

Living in New Zealand an insight

I have lived in New Zealand for over 7 years now and it has been the most life changing thing I have ever done. We moved out here from the UK with our two children Zoe and Sam who were 10 and 3 years old at the time. It was a good age for them to move as they settled very quickly into their new life and as we came over on a Long Term Business Visa Julie and I were kept busy enough to also be able to settle quite quickly. When I look back now it took a good 18 months for us to settle to the point that we were calling New Zealand home and now I feel proud and privileged to be able to live here.

I guess one of the biggest influences on life here in New Zealand is the small population of 4.5 million people in a land mass that is slightly bigger than the UK. It affects every aspect of life here in some positive and negative ways. For example we have lots of space which works wonders on the human psyche but we pay way more for things like mobile phones or maybe some shows don’t make it to NZ as the small population makes the extra journey unprofitable. However this has changed in the last few years with new venues like Vector Arena in Auckland opening and attracting massive international acts who used to settle for playing Australia only.  You see music is a big part of my life and the ability to watch these international acts was something I was potentially giving up by making the move to New Zealand. However, with every negative there is a positive and the smaller population meant that it was far easier for me to network with people in the music industry here. Everybody knows everybody!

The Lifestyle has also had a major effect on the way we lead our life. I travel to the UK every year and sometimes get to see my friends and of course most of them are leading the same lifestyle I was when I lived there, work-pub-work-pub-shops. As we moved to NZ and knew no one here there was no pressure to lead our life in a particular way. We didn’t have to do what our friends were doing but could do anything we wanted. The outdoor lifestyle in NZ also influences a lot of what we do. Easy access to the beaches and Ski fields has opened new experiences for us that we certainly didn’t have back in Coventry. The cost of our social life in NZ is also far lower but remember you can do whatever you want when you move here so if you want to go out pubing and clubing ever night you can (well maybe not outside Auckland where most clubs are closed in the week) If you want to and can afford to trawl the shops everyday you can but the refreshing part about the move is you get to choose the lifestyle you want without any peer pressure. Give this some thought before you make the move.

The Culture in NZ also has had a big effect on us. I am now passionate about Rugby and yet didn’t even know the rules before we moved here. I have a good understanding of the Maori culture and love the Thirsty Thursday or Friday after works drink culture. Kiwi’s like to celebrate and it seems any excuse for a bank holiday is used. We even get the UK Queens birthday as a national holiday here which I didn’t get when I lived in the UK!  New Zealanders are very proud of their country and they are also very friendly but you do need to embrace the culture and become a part of this amazing country. Just take your time and soak it up and eventually you will feel a part of it.

Well we are now helping more and more people make the move here so I just wanted to share my thoughts and emphasise how important it is to fit into your new life. Be open-minded and flexible, learn and adapt and you will be welcome in New Zealand.

Ka Kite (bye for now)

Paul Goddard

 

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