Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘skilled migrant’

New Zealand’s Welcome Mat for New Migrants

On 1  November 2015, a new policy came into place to attract new migrants to take up jobs in regional New Zealand.

‘Regional New Zealand’ means any place outside of the area covered by the Auckland Council (if you know Auckland, that means south of the Bombay Hills; and north just past Warkworth).

Additional Bonus Points

The new measure boosts the bonus points for skilled migrants applying for residence with a job offer outside Auckland – from 10 to 30 points.

And if you are applying under the business categories the points are doubled for entrepreneurs planning to set up businesses in the regions under the Entrepreneur Work Visa from 20 to 40 points.

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Why is New Zealand trying to attract people to locations outside of Auckland?

NZ’s Prime Minister says almost half of the 10,000 skilled migrants (and their families) who get residence each year move to the financial capital.

On the new policy, he says that “we want to balance that out a bit, by attracting more people into other parts of the country to help grow local economies”.

Migrants with offers for jobs in the regions will get extra points that will count towards the 100 they require to apply for residence.

However, they will need to commit to a region for at least 12 months – up from the current requirement of three months.

Business Opportunities

Mr Key has also unveiled changes to encourage entrepreneurs wanting to come to New Zealand to look for business opportunities in the regions. He said these changes will help spread the benefits of migration across the country – particularly in regions that are in greater need for workers, skills and investment.

 

NZ’s Immigration Changes – The Facts

For migrants:

  • Skilled migrants must reach a 100 point threshold to apply for residence – certain skills, industries, job offers and qualifications have a higher number of points attached to them
  • The bonus points for a job offer outside Auckland will increase from 10 to 30, therefore making it easier for them to apply
  • They will need to commit to a region for at least 12 months – up from the current three month requirement

Entrepreneurs:

  • An entrepreneur work visa was launched by the government last year to attract migrants who offer high-level business experience, capital and international connections
  • The extra points they get for setting up a business outside Auckland will double – from 20 to 40
  • Immigration New Zealand expects to approve up to 200 people in 2016 under the entrepreneur visa category

 

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Our view is that there are many fantastic,  challenging work opportunities in New Zealand – and the other main centres of Wellington, Christchurch, Queenstown, Tauranga and New Plymouth have a lot to offer.

Have a look in the jobs section of our Working In New Zealand website, to find something that suits you – or Like our Facebook page to keep up-to-date on New Zealand immigration and employment news.

 

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What jobs are on the New Zealand Skills Shortage List?

Before you get too carried away switching your rugby allegiance to the All Blacks or starting to brush up on your Kiwi slang, it’s a good idea to see whether your skills are needed in New Zealand.

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Although having a job on one of New Zealand’s skill shortage lists isn’t a guarantee of a job or a visa, it can help make the job- and visa-getting experience a bit easier.

There are four skill shortage lists in New Zealand:

  1. Long Term Skill Shortage List
  2. Immediate Skill Shortage List
  3. Canterbury Skill Shortage List
  4. List of Skilled Occupations

Immigration New Zealand has a great tool – put in your occupation and see if it’s a skill in demand. Try the skill shortage list check.

The Long Term Skill Shortage List (LTSSL)

The LTSSL shows the occupations that are in ongoing shortage throughout New Zealand, and the rest of the world.

If you get a job in an occupation that’s on the LTSSL, plus meet any extra requirements, you may be granted a work visa under the Work to Residence category.

That means you may be able to apply for residency in two years, as long as you meet the standard requirements and that your job has a base salary of at least NZ$55,000 per year.

See if your occupation is on the LTSSL.

Immediate Skill Shortage List (ISSL)

The ISSL has occupations where skilled workers are needed immediately in New Zealand and where there are no available New Zealand citizens or residents to take the jobs. This means the applications can be processed quicker.

If you’re offered a job on the ISSL, and meet the requirements, you may be granted an Essential Skills work visa. You can work in New Zealand temporarily but may not be able to apply for residency.

See if your occupation is on the ISSL.

Canterbury Skill Shortage List (CSSL)

Following the Christchurch 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, the CSSL lists the occupations in critical shortage in the Canterbury region. It has occupations on the Immediate and Long Term Skill Shortage Lists that are directly relevant to the Canterbury and Christchurch rebuild.

If your skills are on the CSSL and you have a job offer in Canterbury you may be granted an Essentials Skills work visa which allows you to work temporarily in New Zealand. However if your occupation is also on the LTSSL, then you may be able to apply for residency.

See if your occupation is on the CSSL.

List of Skilled Occupations

If your occupation is on this list, you’re able to apply for a resident visa under the Skilled Migrant  category. This points-based visa considers factors like your age, work experience, qualifications and job offer.

To apply for a Skilled Migrant visa, you must be under 55 years old, meet the skill level for your occupation and meet English language, health and character requirements.

See if your occupation is on the List of Skilled Occupations.

Where to Next?

If you’ve checked the lists and found your occupation, that’s a great first step. You can now:


Make sure you plan your move to New Zealand right the first time, and get the right visa to avoid unnecessary complications later on.  Best of luck!

How to get reliable immigration advice

Hi Everyone

This week, we have some great tips for helping you to find reliable visa and immigration advice. If you’re serious about moving country, one of the best things you can do for yourself is to get a reputable immigration adviser. Why? You’ve all heard the saying a stitch in time saves nine, and this is one case where it’s certainly true!

Why use an immigration adviser?

  • An immigration adviser will give you a realistic idea of your chances of success right from the word go. Of course, your eligibility will depend on your individual circumstances, including factors such as your age, work experience, skills and language ability.
  • If you are eligible, you’ll be told what immigration pathways are available and which one is going to work best for you. You won’t waste time and money heading down the wrong path then having to do a ‘u-turn’ later on.
  • You get the bonus of expert advice to sort out any hitches along the way. Immigration law can be a difficult beastie at the best of times and it’s constantly changing, so up-to-date advice not only smooths out the snags en route, it helps prevent them in the first place!

How can I pick a reliable immigration adviser?

  • Choose someone who is licensed or registered. Legitimate advisers and agents are regulated by a professional body which helps ensure that they are competent. While it won’t necessarily guarantee you professional service, it will go a long way to weeding out ‘cowboy’ outfits! In New Zealand, agents are called licensed immigration advisers, and they are regulated by the Immigration Advisers Authority (IAA); in Australia, they are called registered  migration agents and they are regulated by MARA; and in Canada, they are called immigration consultants and they are regulated by the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC).
  • Ensure that their membership is current. If a licensed agent or business has been investigated for failing to provide a professional service, their licence will have been cancelled. Make a quick call to the regulatory body first to make sure they are still legit before you hand over any money!
  • Check out their credentials. You wouldn’t rent out your house or employ someone without checking their references, so ask if you can speak to a recent client, and check out the agency online too (web, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn). A reputable company will have a professional online presence with a history that can be tracked. If you have friends who’ve already migrated, ask them who they used and what their experience was, or visit ex-pat forums and get recommendations that way. This kind of research takes a bit of extra effort, but it pays off in the long run!

What next?

  • Read up about the immigration categories for New Zealand, Australia and Canada so you know what to expect.
  • If you’re considering emigrating as a skilled migrant, take Working In’s free online visa assessment to have see if you have the right skills to move to Australia or New Zealand. This will help you to determine if it’s worthwhile proceeding.
  • Visit our visa sections for Australia, New Zealand and Canada. There’s loads of info here, including more about visa categories and policy, and reputable advisers in Australia, NZ and Canada who can help you with your move.

Come and see us in person in the UK in June/July!
We have immigration advisers and migration agents attending our Opportunities Overseas Expos to help you with your migration questions so, if you are relocating, make sure you come along to an expo near you! We’ll be in in the UK in Leeds on 30 June-1 July, and in London on 7-8 July, and we’ll have some great job opportunities as well.

Hope to see you there!

Skill shortages in Oz & NZ

Hi again!

Great to see so many of you (9,210 altogether!) visiting us at our Opportunities Overseas Expos in London and Manchester last month, and at our Energy, Mining & Engineering expo in Aberdeen. There’s lots of great talent out there, and many of you who came along are now going through the recruitment process and getting ready for the next exciting step of your journey.

Next up, we’ll be bringing employers from NZ, Australia and Peru to Canada for the Energy, Mining & Engineering International Jobs Expo in May, so what better time to look at the areas of skill shortage, and find out just who’s in demand at the moment.

The Aussie mining boom
Everyone’s heard about the mining boom in Aussie, so it’s no surprise to find that main areas of skill shortage are connected to the mining and oil & gas sector. With a whopping US$229 billion (AU$232 billion) of committed gas projects in the pipeline, Australia has a critical shortage of experienced engineers, tradespeople and construction workers to staff up its raft of mega projects.

Calling all Senior Engineers!
Engineering shortages are biting especially hard, as major mining projects, including the massive AU$43 billion Gorgon project, exhaust the local labour supply. Australia’s national engineering body, Engineers Australia, has predicted that the country’s engineering workforce will need to double just to keep pace with the rapid development, so if you have engineering skills – especially at a senior level – you’ll be very much in demand!

Some of the roles that Aussie employers are recruiting for in Canada include well, reservoir & petroleum engineers; principal, civil, mechanical & process engineers; drilling supervisors; hydrologists; project directors and managers; health & safety managers and engineering managers.

Other energy/infrastructure specialists in demand include transmission line practitioners, waste water and water planning engineers,  site supervisors, environmental advisors and senior planners

Skill shortages in New Zealand
In New Zealand, the skills shortages may not be quite as intense, but the country’s growing energy sector is still short of skilled professionals, with mining specialists, engineers and geologists high on the list of those most in demand. The Christchurch rebuild is also putting the squeeze on the labour market, with engineers and skilled trades already in demand – a shortfall of up to 30,000 workers has already been forecast during the 10-20 year rebuild period.

Some of the roles that NZ employers are recruiting for at the Canada expos include mining, petroleum, geotechnical & field engineers; technical services and production superintendents; and exploration & mine geologists. Within the energy/power sector, there are roles for project engineers & managers, power system analysts, electrical network engineers, electricity asset managers, engineering analysts and substation design engineers.

Come & see us in Canada
So, if you’re in Canada, and you’re working in the oil & gas, energy, engineering or infrastructure sectors, come along and check out the jobs available in Oz & NZ (we’ll also have some jobs in Peru – again, mining-related roles including heavy diesel mechanics and truck operators!). 

We’ll be touching down in the three Canadian cities in 2012: Calgary (5-6 May) at the Calgary TELUS Convention Centre; Vancouver (9 May) at the Hyatt Regency and Edmonton (12-13 May) at the Mayfield Inn & Suites.

Where to book
You can find out more about companies attending and the roles being recruited for at:
www.workingin.com/eme

CALGARY | BOOK NOW
VANCOUVER | BOOK NOW
EDMONTON | BOOK NOW

Hope to see you there!

CHRISTCHURCH AND CANTERBURY WANT YOU!

TVNZ Media Coverage 2nd September 2011:

I have pasted below a link to an interesting interview on TVNZ this morning, about the reality that is the skills gap in Christchurch and Canterbury. 

Building a whole new city is a challenge New Zealand has never faced before.  Of particular relevance to many of you I know read this blog, is the focus placed on attracting skilled migrants from outside New Zealand, into the region.  More so now than ever before.

A few points covered off include;

  • Where can they source skilled people from? 
  • How big is this opportunity for the short and long term development of the region?
  • What kinds of professions are needed immediately and for the future?

Watch the Canterbury Employment and Skills Board speak with TVNZ Breakfast News on the link below:

http://tvnz.co.nz/business-news/amp-sep-2-christchurch-looks-abroad-fill-skills-gap-4-27-video-4381836

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