Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘visa’

Canada’s Skills Shortage List – the Eligible Occupations (listed 1-347)

map-of-canada

As at today’s date (19 August 2015), there are 347 jobs on Canada’s Skills Shortage list.  You will need to be skilled in your chosen area in order to apply via Express Entry, to obtain a visa to live and work in the country (your skill levels will be assessed later in this process).

  1. 0011 Legislators
  2. 0012 Senior government managers and officials
  3. 0013 Senior managers – financial, communications and other business services
  4. 0014 Senior managers – health, education, social and community services and membership organizations
  5. 0015 Senior managers – trade, broadcasting and other services, n.e.c.
  6. 0016 Senior managers – construction, transportation, production and utilities
  7. 0111 Financial managers
  8. 0112 Human resources managers
  9. 0113 Purchasing managers
  10. 0114 Other administrative services managers
  11. 0121 Insurance, real estate and financial brokerage managers
  12. 0122 Banking, credit and other investment managers
  13. 0124 Advertising, marketing and public relations managers
  14. 0125 Other business services managers
  15. 0131 Telecommunication carriers managers
  16. 0132 Postal and courier services managers
  17. 0211 Engineering managers
  18. 0212 Architecture and science managers
  19. 0213 Computer and information systems managers
  20. 0311 Managers in health care
  21. 0411 Government managers – health and social policy development and program administration
  22. 0412 Government managers – economic analysis, policy development and program administration
  23. 0413 Government managers – education policy development and program administration
  24. 0414 Other managers in public administration
  25. 0421 Administrators – post-secondary education and vocational training
  26. 0422 School principals and administrators of elementary and secondary education
  27. 0423 Managers in social, community and correctional services
  28. 0431 Commissioned police officers
  29. 0432 Fire chiefs and senior firefighting officers
  30. 0433 Commissioned officers of the Canadian Forces
  31. 0511 Library, archive, museum and art gallery managers
  32. 0512 Managers – publishing, motion pictures, broadcasting and performing arts
  33. 0513 Recreation, sports and fitness program and service directors
  34. 0601 Corporate sales managers
  35. 0621 Retail and wholesale trade managers
  36. 0631 Restaurant and food service managers
  37. 0632 Accommodation service managers
  38. 0651 Managers in customer and personal services, n.e.c.
  39. 0711 Construction managers
  40. 0712 Home building and renovation managers
  41. 0714 Facility operation and maintenance managers
  42. 0731 Managers in transportation
  43. 0811 Managers in natural resources production and fishing
  44. 0821 Managers in agriculture
  45. 0822 Managers in horticulture
  46. 0823 Managers in aquaculture
  47. 0911 Manufacturing managers
  48. 0912 Utilities managers
  49. 1111 Financial auditors and accountants
  50. 1112 Financial and investment analysts
  51. 1113 Securities agents, investment dealers and brokers
  52. 1114 Other financial officers
  53. 1121 Human resources professionals
  54. 1122 Professional occupations in business management consulting
  55. 1123 Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations
  56. 1211 Supervisors, general office and administrative support workers
  57. 1212 Supervisors, finance and insurance office workers
  58. 1213 Supervisors, library, correspondence and related information workers
  59. 1214 Supervisors, mail and message distribution occupations
  60. 1215 Supervisors, supply chain, tracking and scheduling co-ordination occupations
  61. 1221 Administrative officers
  62. 1222 Executive assistants
  63. 1223 Human resources and recruitment officers
  64. 1224 Property administrators
  65. 1225 Purchasing agents and officers
  66. 1226 Conference and event planners
  67. 1227 Court officers and justices of the peace
  68. 1228 Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers
  69. 1241 Administrative assistants
  70. 1242 Legal administrative assistants
  71. 1243 Medical administrative assistants
  72. 1251 Court reporters, medical transcriptionists and related occupations
  73. 1252 Health information management occupations
  74. 1253 Records management technicians
  75. 1254 Statistical officers and related research support occupations
  76. 1311 Accounting technicians and bookkeepers
  77. 1312 Insurance adjusters and claims examiners
  78. 1313 Insurance underwriters
  79. 1314 Assessors, valuators and appraisers
  80. 1315 Customs, ship and other brokers
  81. 2111 Physicists and astronomers
  82. 2112 Chemists
  83. 2113 Geoscientists and oceanographers
  84. 2114 Meteorologists and climatologists
  85. 2115 Other professional occupations in physical sciences
  86. 2121 Biologists and related scientists
  87. 2122 Forestry professionals
  88. 2123 Agricultural representatives, consultants and specialists
  89. 2131 Civil engineers
  90. 2132 Mechanical engineers
  91. 2133 Electrical and electronics engineers
  92. 2134 Chemical engineers
  93. 2141 Industrial and manufacturing engineers
  94. 2142 Metallurgical and materials engineers
  95. 2143 Mining engineers
  96. 2144 Geological engineers
  97. 2145 Petroleum engineers
  98. 2146 Aerospace engineers
  99. 2147 Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers)
  100. 2148 Other professional engineers, n.e.c.
  101. 2151 Architects
  102. 2152 Landscape architects
  103. 2153 Urban and land use planners
  104. 2154 Land surveyors
  105. 2161 Mathematicians, statisticians and actuaries
  106. 2171 Information systems analysts and consultants
  107. 2172 Database analysts and data administrators
  108. 2173 Software engineers and designers
  109. 2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers
  110. 2175 Web designers and developers
  111. 2211 Chemical technologists and technicians
  112. 2212 Geological and mineral technologists and technicians
  113. 2221 Biological technologists and technicians
  114. 2222 Agricultural and fish products inspectors
  115. 2223 Forestry technologists and technicians
  116. 2224 Conservation and fishery officers
  117. 2225 Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
  118. 2231 Civil engineering technologists and technicians
  119. 2232 Mechanical engineering technologists and technicians
  120. 2233 Industrial engineering and manufacturing technologists and technicians
  121. 2234 Construction estimators
  122. 2241 Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
  123. 2242 Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment)
  124. 2243 Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics
  125. 2244 Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors
  126. 2251 Architectural technologists and technicians
  127. 2252 Industrial designers
  128. 2253 Drafting technologists and technicians
  129. 2254 Land survey technologists and technicians
  130. 2255 Technical occupations in geomatics and meteorology
  131. 2261 Non-destructive testers and inspection technicians
  132. 2262 Engineering inspectors and regulatory officers
  133. 2263 Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
  134. 2264 Construction inspectors
  135. 2271 Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors
  136. 2272 Air traffic controllers and related occupations
  137. 2273 Deck officers, water transport
  138. 2274 Engineer officers, water transport
  139. 2275 Railway traffic controllers and marine traffic regulators
  140. 2281 Computer network technicians
  141. 2282 User support technicians
  142. 2283 Information systems testing technicians
  143. 3011 Nursing co-ordinators and supervisors
  144. 3012 Registered nurses and registered psychiatric nurses
  145. 3111 Specialist physicians
  146. 3112 General practitioners and family physicians
  147. 3113 Dentists
  148. 3114 Veterinarians
  149. 3121 Optometrists
  150. 3122 Chiropractors
  151. 3124 Allied primary health practitioners
  152. 3125 Other professional occupations in health diagnosing and treating
  153. 3131 Pharmacists
  154. 3132 Dietitians and nutritionists
  155. 3141 Audiologists and speech-language pathologists
  156. 3142 Physiotherapists
  157. 3143 Occupational therapists
  158. 3144 Other professional occupations in therapy and assessment
  159. 3211 Medical laboratory technologists
  160. 3212 Medical laboratory technicians and pathologists’ assistants
  161. 3213 Animal health technologists and veterinary technicians
  162. 3214 Respiratory therapists, clinical perfusionists and cardiopulmonary technologists
  163. 3215 Medical radiation technologists
  164. 3216 Medical sonographers
  165. 3217 Cardiology technologists and electrophysiological diagnostic technologists, n.e.c.
  166. 3219 Other medical technologists and technicians (except dental health)
  167. 3221 Denturists
  168. 3222 Dental hygienists and dental therapists
  169. 3223 Dental technologists, technicians and laboratory assistants
  170. 3231 Opticians
  171. 3232 Practitioners of natural healing
  172. 3233 Licensed practical nurses
  173. 3234 Paramedical occupations
  174. 3236 Massage therapists
  175. 3237 Other technical occupations in therapy and assessment
  176. 4011 University professors and lecturers
  177. 4012 Post-secondary teaching and research assistants
  178. 4021 College and other vocational instructors
  179. 4031 Secondary school teachers
  180. 4032 Elementary school and kindergarten teachers
  181. 4033 Educational counsellors
  182. 4111 Judges
  183. 4112 Lawyers and Quebec notaries
  184. 4151 Psychologists
  185. 4152 Social workers
  186. 4153 Family, marriage and other related counsellors
  187. 4154 Professional occupations in religion
  188. 4155 Probation and parole officers and related occupations
  189. 4156 Employment counsellors
  190. 4161 Natural and applied science policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  191. 4162 Economists and economic policy researchers and analysts
  192. 4163 Business development officers and marketing researchers and consultants
  193. 4164 Social policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  194. 4165 Health policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  195. 4166 Education policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  196. 4167 Recreation, sports and fitness policy researchers, consultants and program officers
  197. 4168 Program officers unique to government
  198. 4169 Other professional occupations in social science, n.e.c.
  199. 4211 Paralegal and related occupations
  200. 4212 Social and community service workers
  201. 4214 Early childhood educators and assistants
  202. 4215 Instructors of persons with disabilities
  203. 4216 Other instructors
  204. 4217 Other religious occupations
  205. 4311 Police officers (except commissioned)
  206. 4312 Firefighters
  207. 4313 Non-commissioned ranks of the Canadian Forces
  208. 5111 Librarians
  209. 5112 Conservators and curators
  210. 5113 Archivists
  211. 5121 Authors and writers
  212. 5122 Editors
  213. 5123 Journalists
  214. 5125 Translators, terminologists and interpreters
  215. 5131 Producers, directors, choreographers and related occupations
  216. 5132 Conductors, composers and arrangers
  217. 5133 Musicians and singers
  218. 5134 Dancers
  219. 5135 Actors and comedians
  220. 5136 Painters, sculptors and other visual artists
  221. 5211 Library and public archive technicians
  222. 5212 Technical occupations related to museums and art galleries
  223. 5221 Photographers
  224. 5222 Film and video camera operators
  225. 5223 Graphic arts technicians
  226. 5224 Broadcast technicians
  227. 5225 Audio and video recording technicians
  228. 5226 Other technical and co-ordinating occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting and the performing arts
  229. 5227 Support occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting, photography and the performing arts
  230. 5231 Announcers and other broadcasters
  231. 5232 Other performers, n.e.c.
  232. 5241 Graphic designers and illustrators
  233. 5242 Interior designers and interior decorators
  234. 5243 Theatre, fashion, exhibit and other creative designers
  235. 5244 Artisans and craftspersons
  236. 5245 Patternmakers – textile, leather and fur products
  237. 5251 Athletes
  238. 5252 Coaches
  239. 5253 Sports officials and referees
  240. 5254 Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
  241. 6211 Retail sales supervisors
  242. 6221 Technical sales specialists – wholesale trade
  243. 6222 Retail and wholesale buyers
  244. 6231 Insurance agents and brokers
  245. 6232 Real estate agents and salespersons
  246. 6235 Financial sales representatives
  247. 6311 Food service supervisors
  248. 6312 Executive housekeepers
  249. 6313 Accommodation, travel, tourism and related services supervisors
  250. 6314 Customer and information services supervisors
  251. 6315 Cleaning supervisors
  252. 6316 Other services supervisors
  253. 6321 Chefs
  254. 6322 Cooks
  255. 6331 Butchers, meat cutters and fishmongers – retail and wholesale
  256. 6332 Bakers
  257. 6341 Hairstylists and barbers
  258. 6342 Tailors, dressmakers, furriers and milliners
  259. 6343 Shoe repairers and shoemakers
  260. 6344 Jewellers, jewellery and watch repairers and related occupations
  261. 6345 Upholsterers
  262. 6346 Funeral directors and embalmers
  263. 7201 Contractors and supervisors, machining, metal forming, shaping and erecting trades and related occupations
  264. 7202 Contractors and supervisors, electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
  265. 7203 Contractors and supervisors, pipefitting trades
  266. 7204 Contractors and supervisors, carpentry trades
  267. 7205 Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades, installers, repairers and servicers
  268. 7231 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
  269. 7232 Tool and die makers
  270. 7233 Sheet metal workers
  271. 7234 Boilermakers
  272. 7235 Structural metal and platework fabricators and fitters
  273. 7236 Ironworkers
  274. 7237 Welders and related machine operators
  275. 7241 Electricians (except industrial and power system)
  276. 7242 Industrial electricians
  277. 7243 Power system electricians
  278. 7244 Electrical power line and cable workers
  279. 7245 Telecommunications line and cable workers
  280. 7246 Telecommunications installation and repair workers
  281. 7247 Cable television service and maintenance technicians
  282. 7251 Plumbers
  283. 7252 Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers
  284. 7253 Gas fitters
  285. 7271 Carpenters
  286. 7272 Cabinetmakers
  287. 7281 Bricklayers
  288. 7282 Concrete finishers
  289. 7283 Tile setters
  290. 7284 Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers and lathers
  291. 7291 Roofers and shinglers
  292. 7292 Glaziers
  293. 7293 Insulators
  294. 7294 Painters and decorators (except interior decorators)
  295. 7295 Floor covering installers
  296. 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades
  297. 7302 Contractors and supervisors, heavy equipment operator crews
  298. 7303 Supervisors, printing and related occupations
  299. 7304 Supervisors, railway transport operations
  300. 7305 Supervisors, motor transport and other ground transit operators
  301. 7311 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
  302. 7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics
  303. 7313 Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
  304. 7314 Railway Carmen/women
  305. 7315 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
  306. 7316 Machine fitters
  307. 7318 Elevator constructors and mechanics
  308. 7321 Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics and mechanical repairers
  309. 7322 Motor vehicle body repairers
  310. 7331 Oil and solid fuel heating mechanics
  311. 7332 Appliance servicers and repairers
  312. 7333 Electrical mechanics
  313. 7334 Motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics
  314. 7335 Other small engine and small equipment repairers
  315. 7361 Railway and yard locomotive engineers
  316. 7362 Railway conductors and brakemen/women
  317. 7371 Crane operators
  318. 7372 Drillers and blasters – surface mining, quarrying and construction
  319. 7373 Water well drillers
  320. 7381 Printing press operators
  321. 7384 Other trades and related occupations, n.e.c.
  322. 8211 Supervisors, logging and forestry
  323. 8221 Supervisors, mining and quarrying
  324. 8222 Contractors and supervisors, oil and gas drilling and services
  325. 8231 Underground production and development miners
  326. 8232 Oil and gas well drillers, servicers, testers and related workers
  327. 8241 Logging machinery operators
  328. 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers8255 Contractors and supervisors, landscaping, grounds maintenance and horticulture services
  329. 8261 Fishing masters and officers
  330. 8262 Fishermen/women
  331. 9211 Supervisors, mineral and metal processing
  332. 9212 Supervisors, petroleum, gas and chemical processing and utilities
  333. 9213 Supervisors, food, beverage and associated products processing
  334. 9214 Supervisors, plastic and rubber products manufacturing
  335. 9215 Supervisors, forest products processing
  336. 9217 Supervisors, textile, fabric, fur and leather products processing and manufacturing
  337. 9221 Supervisors, motor vehicle assembling
  338. 9222 Supervisors, electronics manufacturing
  339. 9223 Supervisors, electrical products manufacturing
  340. 9224 Supervisors, furniture and fixtures manufacturing
  341. 9226 Supervisors, other mechanical and metal products manufacturing
  342. 9227 Supervisors, other products manufacturing and assembly
  343. 9231 Central control and process operators, mineral and metal processing
  344. 9232 Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
  345. 9235 Pulping, papermaking and coating control operators
  346. 9241 Power engineers and power systems operators
  347. 9243 Water and waste treatment plant operators

Immigration news round-up – August 2015

This month has seen the release of interesting findings from Canada’s new Express Entry visa system, and the launch of three new exciting provincial visa streams in Canada.

There’s also news of incentives for would-be Kiwis who are willing to live and work in areas outside of Auckland. Find out how to get your skills assessed in Australia; know your rights on an Australian Working Holiday visa; and beware a phishing scam in New Zealand.

Australia

Assessing Authorities

With some visa applications, you’ll be required to prove that your international skills are transferable and relevant to Australia. To do this, you will need a skills assessment undertaken by an authorised organisation. You’ll need to contact them direct and they can provide you with all the relevant forms and information. You may need to pay to have your skills assessed.

View the assessing authorities in Australia.

Being treated fairly on a Working Holiday Visa

Australia offers Working Holiday visa schemes to many countries, including the UK, Europe and China, giving young people (aged 18-30) the opportunity to travel, work and enjoy Australia.

However two Dutch backpackers are taking their Working Holiday employer to court and suing them for unpaid wages. They undertook the unusual job of golf-ball diving (that’s recovering thousands of lost golf balls from golf course lakes and water features) and are claiming that they weren’t paid fairly for their work.

It’s a good reminder to make sure you fully understand the rules and regulations around Australia’s Working Holiday visa and your rights.

Read more about the backpackers’ experience.

Canada

Express Entry report released

Following the launch of Canada’s Express Entry system in January 2015, Citizenship & Immigration Canada has released a report of key findings from its first six months.

These findings include:

  • The pool is growing by about 1,500 persons/profiles per week.
  • The number of profiles completed was 112,701, with 48,723 (that’s roughly 43%) of these not eligible.
  • The most dominant countries of citizenship of invited candidates are India and the Philippines, which each supplied around one-fifth of those invited to apply.

Through the first 11 draws:

  • 4% of those invited to apply did not have a qualifying job offer or enhanced provincial nomination certificate.
  • 65% had a qualifying job offer.
  • 4% had an enhanced provincial nomination certificate.

However, not including the first four draws (because at that stage only applicants with a score above 600 were invited to apply before this threshold was lowered:

  • 41% of those invited to apply did not have a qualifying job offer or an enhanced provincial nomination certificate.

The majority of candidates selected in the sixth (March 27), eighth (April 17) and eleventh (June 27) draws had neither a qualifying job offer nor a provincial nomination certificate.

See the official data from Citizenship & Immigration Canada.

All of this is great news for people looking to apply for a Canadian visa as the requirements are becoming slightly less restrictive.

British Columbia launches new entrepreneur program

British Columbia has recently launched a new visa program aimed specifically at experienced business people and entrepreneurs. Successful applicants will be awarded a work permit. Then, if their business is commercially viable and provides significant benefits to the local economy, they (and their families) will be able to apply for permanent residency through the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP).

Like other Canadian visa programs, this one will work by you entering a pool of candidates with the aim of getting as many points as possible, out of a maximum 200. Only 200 candidates are accepted into the pool each month. BC PNP will then invite the highest-scoring candidates to submit visa applications.

Requirements for this program include factors such as:

  • Business and/or work experience
  • Personal net worth and source of funds
  • Adaptability
  • Business proposal, including proposal investment and local job creation

Find out more about the BC PNP.

Ontario opens two new immigration streams

Ontario is the most sought-after province by would-be Canadians and it’s just opened two new immigration schemes that are aligned with the Express Entry system:

  1. The Human Capital Priorities stream; and
  2. The French-speaking Skilled Worker stream

Find out more about the streams and whether you’re eligible – Human Capital Priorities stream or French-speaking Skilled Worker stream.

New Zealand

Incentive to move to New Zealand’s provincial centres

Auckland is New Zealand’s largest city, and home to thousands of newly landed skills – and now New Zealand wants to encourage people to look beyond Auckland if they’re making the move.

Effective from November 2015, skilled migrants will have bonus points trebled if they apply for residence with a job offer not from Auckland – although you will have to stay in that region for 12 months, rather than three. If you’re starting a business in the provinces, you’ll have your Entrepreneur Work Visa points doubled.

This means it could be easier and quicker for you to move to New Zealand, as long as you’re willing to live and work outside Auckland.

Scam Immigration NZ website warning

A fake website has been set up that is trying to trick people in providing their passport details. The official Immigration NZ website is www.immigration.govt.nz and the fake one is http://www.immigration-govt.nz.

Beware of this site if you’re searching for the Immigration NZ website.

Read more about the scam. 

Planet-Earth

How to get reliable immigration advice

Hi Everyone

This week, we have some great tips for helping you to find reliable visa and immigration advice. If you’re serious about moving country, one of the best things you can do for yourself is to get a reputable immigration adviser. Why? You’ve all heard the saying a stitch in time saves nine, and this is one case where it’s certainly true!

Why use an immigration adviser?

  • An immigration adviser will give you a realistic idea of your chances of success right from the word go. Of course, your eligibility will depend on your individual circumstances, including factors such as your age, work experience, skills and language ability.
  • If you are eligible, you’ll be told what immigration pathways are available and which one is going to work best for you. You won’t waste time and money heading down the wrong path then having to do a ‘u-turn’ later on.
  • You get the bonus of expert advice to sort out any hitches along the way. Immigration law can be a difficult beastie at the best of times and it’s constantly changing, so up-to-date advice not only smooths out the snags en route, it helps prevent them in the first place!

How can I pick a reliable immigration adviser?

  • Choose someone who is licensed or registered. Legitimate advisers and agents are regulated by a professional body which helps ensure that they are competent. While it won’t necessarily guarantee you professional service, it will go a long way to weeding out ‘cowboy’ outfits! In New Zealand, agents are called licensed immigration advisers, and they are regulated by the Immigration Advisers Authority (IAA); in Australia, they are called registered  migration agents and they are regulated by MARA; and in Canada, they are called immigration consultants and they are regulated by the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC).
  • Ensure that their membership is current. If a licensed agent or business has been investigated for failing to provide a professional service, their licence will have been cancelled. Make a quick call to the regulatory body first to make sure they are still legit before you hand over any money!
  • Check out their credentials. You wouldn’t rent out your house or employ someone without checking their references, so ask if you can speak to a recent client, and check out the agency online too (web, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn). A reputable company will have a professional online presence with a history that can be tracked. If you have friends who’ve already migrated, ask them who they used and what their experience was, or visit ex-pat forums and get recommendations that way. This kind of research takes a bit of extra effort, but it pays off in the long run!

What next?

  • Read up about the immigration categories for New Zealand, Australia and Canada so you know what to expect.
  • If you’re considering emigrating as a skilled migrant, take Working In’s free online visa assessment to have see if you have the right skills to move to Australia or New Zealand. This will help you to determine if it’s worthwhile proceeding.
  • Visit our visa sections for Australia, New Zealand and Canada. There’s loads of info here, including more about visa categories and policy, and reputable advisers in Australia, NZ and Canada who can help you with your move.

Come and see us in person in the UK in June/July!
We have immigration advisers and migration agents attending our Opportunities Overseas Expos to help you with your migration questions so, if you are relocating, make sure you come along to an expo near you! We’ll be in in the UK in Leeds on 30 June-1 July, and in London on 7-8 July, and we’ll have some great job opportunities as well.

Hope to see you there!

So how do you get a visa?

Kia Ora,

I want to start by thanking the thousands of people who read our blogs over the past week, almost 11,000 of you!  The response has been amazing and thanks for all the great questions and comments.  We would love to reply to all the comments but Jenny and I make sure we read every one.  Some of the comments ask the same question, so we will use your comments to help create future blogs.  Do let us know if there is any topic in particular you’d like to see on our blog and Jenny and I will do our best to include that in one of our posts.

Jenny’s blog about how to write a CV was hugely popular.  Please don’t send your CV’s to us. There is much more involved in the immigration process than sending your CV to an employer or recruiter. One of the most frequent comments we had was “How can I get a visa and can you help me?”  So in today’s blog I am going to give you some information to help you plan your move.

The visa and the job offer are obviously 2 very important factors to focus on when making the move.  But there is so much more involved.  One of the first things you need to do is get accurate answers to important these important questions:

  • What type of visa’s am I eligible for?
  • What are my employment prospects?
  • Do I need a job offer to secure a visa or can I apply without a job offer?

You can only make an effective plan if you know the answers to these questions.

Other things you need to know:

  • How much money will I need?
  • How long will it take?

The answer is that every move is different. We help hundreds of people move to Australia and New Zealand each year and every application is unique.

Communication is crucial to the whole process.  English language ability is tested if English is not your first language and employers will want to know that you have excellent communication skills.  You may be able to move to New Zealand or Australia within a couple of months of securing a job offer but if you are applying for jobs now, are you ready to catch that plane and start work?

So, here is how Working In Visas help people make the journey:

  • Complete our online migration map questionnaire, find out if you are eligible to migrate http://www.workingin-visa.com/visa-assessment/free/stage-1
  • If eligible; you may be invited to talk to one of our experienced consultants who will answer all your questions and outline your migration options
  • You will be assigned your own Migration Agent to manage your move and be given all the tools and support you need to search and apply for jobs
  • Your visa application will be lodged so that it meets current Immigration Policy

Many applications are declined, simply because the migrant involved do not get accurate advice about their move, right at the start of the process.  Emigrating is one of the most life changing events you can undertake and so it is critical to make sure you make a plan.  If you are eligible to migrate and meet the immigration criteria then we may be able to help you.

On a lighter note it is Friday here in Auckland and we are just hours away from the highly anticipated Rugby World Cup 2011 Opening Ceremony!! I have my All Blacks shirt on and will be heading up to Parnell to watch New Zealand’s largest firework display and then off to watch the big game.  It makes me feel even luckier than usual to be able to live here right now – New Zealand as a whole has come alive, and with 90,000 international fans here to watch the rugby, the world really has come to play – It is fantastic!!  Check out the coverage if you get a chance it will also give you an insight into our culture http://www.tvnz.co.nz

Ka Kite (bye for now),

Paul

Where have we been?

Hi Everyone,

sorry it has been so long since our last post but as you know we were over in the UK at our Expos in Leeds and London and the interest was even higher than expected. Over 5000 people attended and we were flat out busy. Jenny and I are now back safely in the New Zealand office (well, actually Jenny is taking a well deserved break in Fiji) and I just wanted to let you know how things have moved on already for some of the people we met at the expo.

The employers and recruiters who flew over from Australia and New Zealand were all really pleased with the quality of the people they met in the UK. Many have already offered jobs to the people they met who are ready to move and they are busy following up on the hundreds of others whose skills are needed.

The key thing to remember here is that when you come to an expo the exhibitors will be talking to a lot of people and they will be focusing very closely on those people who are ready to make the move. Coming to the expos and being able to show how committed you are will put you ahead of the others who are researching the move. Although employers and recruiters have flown thousands of miles to meet you they are still looking for the best quality people who are committed to making the move.

Of course we have lots of people who come along to the expos because they are researching the move and they want to know the best way to proceed. I personally met thousands of people who attended our working in seminars on Australia and New Zealand and hopefully got to speak to most of you. If you are not sure of the best way for you and your family to migrate then the best thing to do at the expo is sign up for our migration map and hundreds of people did this and we are now busy having consultations with these people giving them all the information they need to be able to proceed and that information is tailored to them and their circumstances.

Of course it’s not all work and it was good to spend some time in Leeds as I hadn’t been there in years and any down time in London is always fun. There is a lot of meeting and mingling with all the exhibitors at these events and this is where we have a unique position compared to other immigration companies. Not only do we organise the expos but we also exhibit at them and build relationships with all the other exhibitors and are in constant touch with them making those relationships work for our visa clients.

So if you did come along to the expo I would love to hear from you so please leave a comment. We are already getting busy organising our Canadian, South Africa and next round of UK expos due to take place in November.

I’ll be giving you some insider tips on how to make the most of the expo and even running some competitions so you can win some free tickets so do interact with us on this blog and we will respond to all comments.

We aim to blog more frequently (well when Jen gets back from FIJI, can you tell I’m jealous) so do keep checking in and tell your friends.

For those of you looking for jobs in New Zealand or Australia here are some handy tips to help you on your way.

A Positive attitude – You need to come across to employers as committed to the move with an upbeat positive flexible attitude. If you can also show commitment to the move by visits you have made to Australia or New Zealand or show engagement with a company such as workingin visas this can also add to your appeal

A Good CV – It is very important to have your CV formatted in a way that suits the employers. This could be very different to how you currently format your CV. Grammar and spelling is crucial and your CV should be tailored to each application

Understand your potential employer – Read the job description carefully. What are they looking for? Who are they and what do they do? You need to do as much research as possible before applying

Be Proactive – Follow up your job applications with phone calls as well as emails. Phone calls show motivation and are the best way to make contact. Keep track of your applications and even follow up the rejections with a request for feedback.

Know your timeframes – This is essential. Do not apply for jobs unless you are able to move. Some employers will wait months but most will want you to start work ASAP.

Leave your comments we want to hear from you

Ka Kite (bye for now)

Paul Goddard

IAA license 201001948

Interest in emigrating is still high

I am now getting used to being back in the UK and it looks like we have bought the sun with us from New Zealand. The expos went really well and were very busy. It was great to meet such a wide range of people and see that the interest in emigrating is very strong. Apparently around 50% of people consider moving to a different country at some point in their life. For most people it’s not an easy decision and it takes a lot of research and the expo was great for getting information. A lot of people I met were totally committed to making the move but were unsure of how to proceed. It was great to be able to help them take that first step to a new life and it reminded me of how I felt when we first commited to making the move. It’s exciting and scary but also helps focus your plans to make the move successful.
Looking forward to seeing a bit of London later on today while the sun is shining. Have to buy something for my wife and children so a call into the shopping centre in Hammersmith might be on the cards. I had to remember it was mothers day yesterday as we have a different date in New Zealand so my parents are lucky they as they get two days per year.
Will update you with another blog before I get on the train to Manchester. If you are interested in coming along and meeting us you can book here http://www.expo-newzealand.com

See you soon

Paul Goddard

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