Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘visas’

Canada is #1 in the world because…

What comes to mind when you think of Canada? The imposing rugged wilderness of the Rockies? Maple syrup and Tim Hortons? Ice hockey? Hat-clad, horse riding Mounties? Famously friendly inhabitants?

Wherever your mind takes you about Canada, it seems that the rest of the world agrees with all the good stuff. Take a look.

The world’s most admired country

The Reputation Institute’s 2015 Country Reptrak® Survey has revealed that Canada is the world’s most reputable country – beating 54 other nations to the top spot. In particular, Canada scored highly for its effective government, absence of corruption, friendly and welcoming people, and welfare support system.

The Institute surveyed approximately 48,000 residents of G8 countries to gather the data for their rankings. Survey respondents ranked the reputations of the world’s 55 wealthiest nations on a variety of environmental, political and economic factors.

This highlights how Canada still remains a popular choice for people looking to move countries.

Check out the full report here.

Clifton Hill, Ontario - by Gary Burke, courtesy of Flickr.com

Clifton Hill, Ontario – by Gary Burke, courtesy of Flickr.com

The world’s safest country

Your well-being is influenced by your feelings of personal security and how unlikely it is you’ll be physically assaulted or become a victim of crime. In Canada, the chances of you being assaulted are incredibly low.

The OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) Better Life Index focuses on the well-being of inhabitants across countries, rather than looking at economic statistics and cold data. Their most recent findings showed that 1.3% of people in Canada reported being an assault victim in the past 12 months. This is the lowest rate in the OECD, where the average is 3.9%.

So expect a safer, happier you if you make the move to Canada – see how else Canada scores in the Better Life Index.  For a sneak peek, it ranks above average in housing, well-being, health status, income and wealth, social connections, environmental quality, jobs and earnings, education and skills, and civic engagement.

Call Canada home

If you’re keen to make the move to one of the world’s best countries, don’t miss our Working International Job Expo next March in the UK.  As always, we’ll have a section devoted exclusively to Canada, with Canadian employers and exhibitors there to help you find a job, and learn more about visas.  In the meantime though, you can still search for a job online and find out more about Canadian visas.

You tell us

What do you think Canada is #1 in the world for? Find us on Facebook and share your thoughts with us.

Spirit Island, Canadian Rockies - by Ann Badjura of Ann Badjura Photography, courtesy of Flickr.com

Spirit Island, Canadian Rockies – by Ann Badjura of Ann Badjura Photography, courtesy of Flickr.com

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Australia is #1 in the world because …

You might imagine that Australia’s beaches, exciting career opportunities or national sports teams are all world-beating – but what does the data show?

It shows that Australia does top the charts – here’s a look at what Australia does better than anywhere else in the world.

The world’s most liveable cities

Each year the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) undertakes and releases its Global Liveability Ranking and Report which provides scores for 140 cities worldwide. Its latest report (from 2014 data) places Melbourne at the top of the list – for the fifth year in a row.

The report looks at 30 factors across five areas: stability, infrastructure, education, healthcare and environment. Melbourne received perfect scores in healthcare, education and infrastructure, culture and environment and sport. Overall, it scored a near-perfect 97.5 out of 100.

It’s not hard to see why. Melbournians enjoy unburdened, effective infrastructure. Melbourne may be a big city but it has the Yarra River flowing through it and masses of green open parks and gardens, contributing to its residents’ sense of wellbeing. It boasts impressive arts and culture and winding laneways of bars, restaurants, cafes and shops. It also has a low murder rate, helping its residents feel safe.

Australia also has three other cities in the top 10 – no other country has that many top-ranking cities in the list. Adelaide is joint fifth, with Sydney seventh and Perth eighth.

Check out the rest of the world’s best cities here.

Twelve Apostles by Worakit Sirijinda, sourced from FreeDigitalImages.com. Northern Territory.

The top in civic engagement

The OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) Better Life Index goes beyond GDP data and economic statistics. Instead it delves into the well-being of countries’ residents, looking at 11 essential areas of living conditions and quality of life.

The OECD believes that trusting your government is essential to your sense of well-being and that a high voter turnout is a measure of citizen engagement. In Australia, voter turnout is 93% – whereas the OECD average is 68%.

This means Australia tops the chart of OECD countries in terms of civic engagement. It suggests that the Australian political system performs well as it reflects the will of a huge proportion of the population.

See how Australia performs in other OECD measures.

Make the move

If you think Australia is right for you, you can put your plan into action this October – the Working International Expo is coming to London and Manchester. Meet Australian employers, find out more about your visa options and sort out your move – all under one roof. See you there!

You tell us

What do you think Australia is #1 in the world for? Find us on Facebook and let us know your thoughts.

Dancing Lights by Gav Owen, sourced from Flickr.com. Melbourne.

Immigration news round-up – October 2015

This month, Australia has recently launched a work and holiday arrangement with the People’s Republic of China and a new online visa label system. In Canada, there’s a mixed bag of news – from holds on some visa schemes to increased thresholds for other schemes. With all these changes, you could benefit from some Canadian visa advice – see who can help.

Plus in New Zealand there’s great news for overseas agricultural workers seeking seasonal work, plus some handy information about what you can and can’t bring into the country.

Flag - Australian

Australia

Work and Holiday arrangement with the People’s Republic of China now live

As of 21 September 2015, up to 5,000 educated young Chinese nationals per year will be able to take advantage of the Work and Holiday visa arrangement between Australia and the People’s Republic of China.

The visa allows young Chinese nationals to have an extended holiday of up to 12 months in Australia, where they can undertake short-term work or study.

If you’re a Chinese national visit the Australian Embassy Beijing website to see if you’re eligible. Or find out more about Australia’s working holiday visa scheme.

Electronic visa record replaces passport labels

Traditionally when you received your Australian visa, a label was fixed into your passport. However, from 1 September 2015, you’re no longer able to request and pay for a visa label.

Instead, you access your visa record through the free Visa Entitlement Verification Online (VEVO) service. When you scan your passport at the airport, it’s linked automatically to this service and will let passport officials know your visa status.

This change reflects the Australian Government’s agenda to make their services more accessible and convenient to their clients through the provision of secure online services. VEVO is also efficient, reliable and provides real-time information about your visa.

This demonstrates Australia’s commitment to a overhauled, more streamlined and efficient visa system. More information is available at the Department of Immigration and Border Protection.

Flag - Canada

Canada

Fast track your move to Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia, on Canada’s east coast, has just announced they will be able to fast track another 300 migrant workers who qualify under the express entry visa scheme that’s aimed at skilled workers.

It also means that Nova Scotia can nominate a total of 1,350 immigrants in 2015 under their provincial nominee program – almost double the previously allowed 700.

Nova Scotia remains a popular choice for skilled workers. In 2014, 2,670 newcomers settled in Nova Scotia – more people than have ever arrived in the past 10 years. Nova Scotia clearly offers a lot to would-be Canadians too – Statistics Canada show a retention rate of 71 per cent for immigrants that landed in Nova Scotia between 2007 and 2011.

If you’d like to take advantage of this fast track entry to Nova Scotia, take a look at some job opportunities – having a Canadian job offer may help your visa application. Or find out more about Nova Scotia’s nominee program.

Alberta and British Columbia release updates to their Provincial Nominee Programs

Canadian provinces manage their own visa schemes, called Provincial Nominee Programs (PNP). They all have their own rules, requirements and application thresholds. Alberta and British Columbia have both released updates to their programs:

Alberta

Due to a 10,000-application backlog, no new applications will be accepted to the Alberta Immigration Nominee Program until January 2016. However, if you’re interested in moving to Alberta, you can still apply through Canada’s express entry visa scheme.

British Columbia

Applications to the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BCPNP) Skills Immigration stream and Express Entry stream have been put on hold until early 2016, due to application thresholds being met.

However, the Health Care Professional, Northeast Pilot Project and Entrepreneur Immigration streams will continue to accept applications.

Find out more about the BCPNP.

Skill shortages felt across Canada

A new survey by CareerBuilder.ca shows the impact of skill shortages on Canadian businesses:

  • 29% of survey respondents (almost three in 10 employers) have jobs that have been unfilled for 12 weeks or longer.
  • Three quarters of those respondents say this has negatively impacted upon their companies.
  • 31% of respondents said that un-fillable job openings lead to work not getting done – with 22% saying their companies are losing revenue.

With Canadian businesses feeling the pinch of a lack of skilled workers, this may be good news for skilled workers wanting to move to Canada – watch this space.

Flag - NZ

New Zealand

Overseas agricultural contractors able to work easier in NZ

By 1 June 2016, seasonal workers from overseas could find it easier to temporarily work and live in New Zealand. A new visa deal means that rural contractors can more simply bring in overseas workers to help them over the busy summer harvest season.

Rural Contractors New Zealand (RCNZ) president Steve Levet estimates that the industry requires around 900 seasonal staff from overseas each year. In New Zealand there is a shortage of suitably skilled operators able to handle highly sophisticated machinery – so they look overseas for the skills they need.

These overseas workers – traditionally from Ireland and England – have good mechanical skills and are already up and running, meaning they don’t require extensive training.

About the new scheme

With a less rigorous process than what currently has to be followed, under the new scheme RCNZ would apply for Approval in Principle on behalf of all its members.

Then their members can apply online for a visa for the person they’re recruiting without having to meet any of the current requirements, which include having to advertise and going through Work and Income New Zealand first.

No further details are available at this stage – we’ll keep you updated. If you’re not already on our New Zealand mailing list, sign up [Link to: NZ newsletter sign up] and you’ll be the first to know.

Arriving in New Zealand – What you need to know

Whether you’re just visiting or are coming to New Zealand permanently, there are things you need to know.

For starters, do you need a visa? If you’re going on holiday, you might not – see if you need a visitor’s visa.  If you’d like to work and live in New Zealand, you will – read more about NZ visas.

What you can’t bring in to NZ

Pretty standard stuff, but this list includes:

  • Hazardous materials.
  • Endangered species (without a permit).
  • Weapons (without a permit).
  • Objectionable publications, including videos and digital images, or
  • Controlled drugs.

What you have to declare

New Zealand has very strict biosecurity rules – not surprisingly as any rogue flora or fauna can wreck havoc on its unique ecosystem. This means you have to declare the following items when you arrive:

  • Food of any kind – this even includes any food, especially fruit, you might have picked up on the plane or coming through duty free.
  • Plants or parts of plants (alive or dead).
  • Animals (alive or dead) or their products.
  • Equipment used with animals.
  • Camping gear, golf clubs and used bicycles – even muddy walking boots.
  • Biological specimens.

Anything you declare will be examined to check it’s ok to bring into NZ. This may include it being cleaned or treated before being allowed in.

The fines for not declaring any of the above are very high – and not worth the risk.

For more information about what you can (and can’t) bring in New Zealand, visit the New Zealand Government website.

Migration to New Zealand reaching its peak

New Zealand has always been a popular choice for skilled international workers but now, finally, the figures seem to be nearing their peak. A recent report by Westpac, a NZ bank, shows that migration to NZ is slowing.

One reason that could be behind this is the approval process for a resident visa, which favours applicants who have a job offer in New Zealand. Another is that NZ’s residence approval targets remain at 45,000 – 50,000 a year, which simply has not kept up with the demand.

Finally, Westpac estimated that Auckland (prime location of choice for most migrant workers) is not keeping up with the housing demand, which is under pressure from both migrant arrival and natural occupant increase.

So, if you’re thinking of coming to New Zealand, make sure you consider other parts of the country before you make the move.  It’s not impossible to get your metaphorical foot in the door in Auckland, but making sure you’ve ticked key boxes (like getting a job prior) will help you get ahead.

The Best 3 Ways to Move to Canada

You’ve imagined tellng your current boss that you’re leaving for Canada. You’ve researched where you want to live. You’ve started the job search. But you’re still not sure how to actually make the move from the computer screen to Canada.

Sound familiar?

We’ve compiled our top three ways to make your move to Canada a reality this year.

canada lake

Work in an in-demand industry, and land a job before you go

An obvious start, but make sure you’ve researched what jobs are actually in demand in Canada. You’ll get extra points on your visa application if you have a qualifying job offer from a Canadian employer.

We’ve compiled a post about Canada’s latest skill shortages – check it out to see if your occupation is needed in Canada.

If your occupation is on there, start your job search. You can try Working In Canada’s job board which is frequently updated.

If your occupation isn’t on the list, there are other visa options available to you – see ‘Get clued up on Canadian visas’ below.

Meet Canadian employers face-to-face

Or, even better than a job board, you could visit the Working International Expo. This October we’re coming to London and Dublin (our boutique, Canada-only show) with Canadian employers recruiting for a range of job skills and industries.  Attending an expo is a great way to meet these Canadian employers face to face. You’ll get the opportunity to sell your skills and experience and you may even interview while you’re there.

consider a move outside the big cities

Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver are really popular with would-be Canadians, so think about making the move to some of the smaller provinces. The provinces experience critical skill shortages (meaning they’re more likely to look internationally for the skills they need) but still offer the incredible lifestyle and landscape of Canada’s major cities (arguably more so, as they’re less populated).

Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) operates currently in these provinces:

  • Alberta
  • Manitoba
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Yukon
  • British Columbia
  • New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia
  • Saskatchewan
  • Ontario

PNP applications are given preference over other skilled visa applications (like the Federal Skilled Worker stream) by Citizenship & Immigration Canada, as they look to find the skills the provinces really need.

Get clued up on Canadian visas

There are multiple visa options into Canada for skilled workers, entrepreneurs, business owners, students, family members, and more.

The best way to understand the different routes into Canada and the options available to you is to get specialist visa advice.  At the Working International Expo, we’ve got Canadian visa experts (like Brazolot Migration Group) on hand to guide you through your different options and the visa process.

You can also explore Citizenship & Immigration Canada’s website to determine your eligibility.

Show your commitment

Canadian employers want to see an understanding about what relocating to Canada will really mean to you – and they want to see your commitment to making your new life work.

Have you ever visited Canada?  Do you have family in Canada?  Will you be bringing all your family with you to Canada? Or will all of your family be back home? How will you adjust to your new life?  Are you in it for the long haul or will you turn around and head back home after only a few months?

Consider the above questions and be sure that a move to Canada is right for you.

…It is? Great, going to the Working International Expo is a good way to show your commitment and enthusiasm. You can research all your visa options, meet potential employers and sort your move – from arranging professional movers to opening a bank account.

Make the move to Canada this October

You can arrange your move to Canada this October without leaving the UK or Ireland. The Working International Expo is coming to London, Dublin (our boutique, one-day expo featuring Canadian employers only), and Manchester, starting in a fortnight!

See you there!

Aurora Borealis, Canada

Immigration news round-up – September 2015

As September slides around, it’s been a bit quiet on the visa news front from Australia, Canada and New Zealand. This is true for New Zealand especially – perhaps because the national focus is on that upcoming Rugby World Cup?

This month find out the financial benefits of moving to Australia for skilled workers; about two more visa schemes for Canada; and an upcoming snapshot of life for new Kiwis.

Australia

Moving to Australia pays off?

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has, for the first time, released some data on the personal income of Australian migrants. If you’re wondering about the financial implications of a move to Australia, have a look at some key figures:

  • The total income of migrant taxpayers in the 2009-10 financial year was $37.7 billion
  • Employee income contributed 92% to total income, of which $25.5 billion was reported by migrants from the skilled visa stream
  • Skilled visa holders’ average employee income was about $5,000 higher than the national average of $48,907 for all Australian taxpayers

So moving to Australia under the skilled visa stream means you could have an income higher than other Australian taxpayers.

Read all the data on the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ website, or start looking for that skilled job in Australia.

Canada

Quebec Immigration Investor Program reopens

If you’re keen on Canada, you’ll be pleased to hear that Quebec’s Immigration Investor Program has reopened. One of the world’s most popular immigrant investor programmes, this visa scheme allows qualified investors and their dependent family members the chance to gain Canadian permanent residency through investing CAD$800,000 risk-free, through an approved financial intermediary.

Applications opened on 31 August 2015 and will close 29 January 2016 – although it’s expected that the application quota of 1,750 will be reached before then.

Find out more about the requirements at Quebec’s official immigration website.

British Columbia needs skilled trade workers

Fort St John, in the north of the Canadian province of British Columbia, has recently announced the establishment of a pilot programme to bring in skilled international workers.

They are looking especially for skilled and experienced trade workers, such as electricians and welders.

No further details are available yet, but we’ll update you as soon as they become available.

New Zealand

Migrant Survey

Immigration New Zealand has begun the process of collecting data for its 2015 Migrant Survey. It’s an annual survey, sent out to a random sample of people who’ve been through New Zealand’s immigration process, that asks for feedback on topics including jobs, education background and levels of happiness.

Immigration New Zealand then takes on board the feedback to work out how new Kiwis settle into New Zealand and whether they can improve their services for future new migrants.

As the survey has just been sent out, we don’t have details of the results yet but it’s sure to be an interesting snapshot of life in New Zealand for new Kiwis. We’ll make sure we post the survey results when they’re released – if you haven’t already, sign up to our newsletter.  We’ll then email you this survey data when it’s available – easy!

Maid of the Mist VII, Niagara Falls

The 3 Best Ways to Move to New Zealand

Auckland Skyline
Exciting career opportunities.  Jaw-droppingly beautiful scenery.  The All Blacks.  Hobbiton.  There are hundreds of reasons why you should move to New Zealand…

…but what about how to move to New Zealand?  We’ve put together our top three ways to help you make the move.

1.  Be in demand in New Zealand

Firstly, do your research to understand if your unique skills and experience are needed in New Zealand. The more in demand you are, the more likely it is you’ll get a visa.

Thankfully we’ve done all the hard work and recently produced an article about the latest skill shortages in New Zealand. Take a look to see if you’re needed…

You are?  Brilliant, get started with your job search today. Working In New Zealand’s online jobs board is regularly updated with jobs across New Zealand in a variety of industries.

If your occupation isn’t listed – and you don’t fancy retraining – there are other visa options available. See ‘Discover your New Zealand visa options’ below.

Meet New Zealand employers face to face

Searching for jobs online is convenient, but nothing beats meeting potential employers face to face.  You can do just that this October at the Working International Expo in London and Manchester.  Enjoy face to face time, get all your questions answered, and even interview with employers while you’re there.  Immigration New Zealand will be on hand too, with plenty of useful information about New Zealand jobs and visas.

2.  There’s more to New Zealand than Auckland

Even Prime Minister John Key recognises it – that’s why he’s announced new visa schemes that’ll give you more points if you work in one of the regions, rather than Auckland.

From November 2015, skilled migrants will have bonus points trebled if they apply for residence with a job offer not from Auckland.  If you’re starting a business in the regions, you’ll have your Entrepreneur Work Visa points doubled.

If you’re willing to live and work outside Auckand for at least 12 months, it could be easier and quicker for you to move to New Zealand.  There isn’t any more information available yet, but sign up to our newsletter and we’ll let you know when more information is released.

Discover your New Zealand visa options

Skilled workers, students, family members, entrepreneurs – there are multiple visa options for New Zealand.  To find out what’s right for you, it’s best to get expert visa advice from licensed immigration advisers.

This October you can meet the real experts – Immigration New Zealand. They’ll be in London and Manchester.  Migration Planners, experts in New Zealand migration and visas, will also be there.

3.  Prove your commitment

Kiwi employers want to be sure that you understand the implications of leaving your life behind and starting again in New Zealand – and that you’re committed to this.

Have you ever visited New Zealand?  Do you have friends or family there?  Are you planning to visit?  Have you spoken to anyone who’s already made the move?  How will you cope thousands of miles (or kilometers) from home?  Will you land and start to settle in, only to go back a few months later?

If you still think the move is for you, great. Going along to the Working International Expo is one way to show your commitment. You can chat to Kiwis face to face, and understand what it’s really like to live and work in New Zealand.

Make the move to New Zealand this October

At the Working International Expo, you can get all your questions answered under one roof. Meet Kiwi employers, find a job, sort your visa and arrange your move – from professional movers to opening your bank account.

We’re heading to London and Manchester, and tickets are flying out the door.  Get in quick – we’ll see you there!

Wairoa, New Zealand

What jobs are on the New Zealand Skills Shortage List?

Before you get too carried away switching your rugby allegiance to the All Blacks or starting to brush up on your Kiwi slang, it’s a good idea to see whether your skills are needed in New Zealand.

waiheke_Fotor

Although having a job on one of New Zealand’s skill shortage lists isn’t a guarantee of a job or a visa, it can help make the job- and visa-getting experience a bit easier.

There are four skill shortage lists in New Zealand:

  1. Long Term Skill Shortage List
  2. Immediate Skill Shortage List
  3. Canterbury Skill Shortage List
  4. List of Skilled Occupations

Immigration New Zealand has a great tool – put in your occupation and see if it’s a skill in demand. Try the skill shortage list check.

The Long Term Skill Shortage List (LTSSL)

The LTSSL shows the occupations that are in ongoing shortage throughout New Zealand, and the rest of the world.

If you get a job in an occupation that’s on the LTSSL, plus meet any extra requirements, you may be granted a work visa under the Work to Residence category.

That means you may be able to apply for residency in two years, as long as you meet the standard requirements and that your job has a base salary of at least NZ$55,000 per year.

See if your occupation is on the LTSSL.

Immediate Skill Shortage List (ISSL)

The ISSL has occupations where skilled workers are needed immediately in New Zealand and where there are no available New Zealand citizens or residents to take the jobs. This means the applications can be processed quicker.

If you’re offered a job on the ISSL, and meet the requirements, you may be granted an Essential Skills work visa. You can work in New Zealand temporarily but may not be able to apply for residency.

See if your occupation is on the ISSL.

Canterbury Skill Shortage List (CSSL)

Following the Christchurch 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, the CSSL lists the occupations in critical shortage in the Canterbury region. It has occupations on the Immediate and Long Term Skill Shortage Lists that are directly relevant to the Canterbury and Christchurch rebuild.

If your skills are on the CSSL and you have a job offer in Canterbury you may be granted an Essentials Skills work visa which allows you to work temporarily in New Zealand. However if your occupation is also on the LTSSL, then you may be able to apply for residency.

See if your occupation is on the CSSL.

List of Skilled Occupations

If your occupation is on this list, you’re able to apply for a resident visa under the Skilled Migrant  category. This points-based visa considers factors like your age, work experience, qualifications and job offer.

To apply for a Skilled Migrant visa, you must be under 55 years old, meet the skill level for your occupation and meet English language, health and character requirements.

See if your occupation is on the List of Skilled Occupations.

Where to Next?

If you’ve checked the lists and found your occupation, that’s a great first step. You can now:


Make sure you plan your move to New Zealand right the first time, and get the right visa to avoid unnecessary complications later on.  Best of luck!

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