Specialists in Migration, Visas, and Overseas Recruitment

Posts tagged ‘jobs’

Canada is #1 in the world because…

What comes to mind when you think of Canada? The imposing rugged wilderness of the Rockies? Maple syrup and Tim Hortons? Ice hockey? Hat-clad, horse riding Mounties? Famously friendly inhabitants?

Wherever your mind takes you about Canada, it seems that the rest of the world agrees with all the good stuff. Take a look.

The world’s most admired country

The Reputation Institute’s 2015 Country Reptrak® Survey has revealed that Canada is the world’s most reputable country – beating 54 other nations to the top spot. In particular, Canada scored highly for its effective government, absence of corruption, friendly and welcoming people, and welfare support system.

The Institute surveyed approximately 48,000 residents of G8 countries to gather the data for their rankings. Survey respondents ranked the reputations of the world’s 55 wealthiest nations on a variety of environmental, political and economic factors.

This highlights how Canada still remains a popular choice for people looking to move countries.

Check out the full report here.

Clifton Hill, Ontario - by Gary Burke, courtesy of Flickr.com

Clifton Hill, Ontario – by Gary Burke, courtesy of Flickr.com

The world’s safest country

Your well-being is influenced by your feelings of personal security and how unlikely it is you’ll be physically assaulted or become a victim of crime. In Canada, the chances of you being assaulted are incredibly low.

The OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) Better Life Index focuses on the well-being of inhabitants across countries, rather than looking at economic statistics and cold data. Their most recent findings showed that 1.3% of people in Canada reported being an assault victim in the past 12 months. This is the lowest rate in the OECD, where the average is 3.9%.

So expect a safer, happier you if you make the move to Canada – see how else Canada scores in the Better Life Index.  For a sneak peek, it ranks above average in housing, well-being, health status, income and wealth, social connections, environmental quality, jobs and earnings, education and skills, and civic engagement.

Call Canada home

If you’re keen to make the move to one of the world’s best countries, don’t miss our Working International Job Expo next March in the UK.  As always, we’ll have a section devoted exclusively to Canada, with Canadian employers and exhibitors there to help you find a job, and learn more about visas.  In the meantime though, you can still search for a job online and find out more about Canadian visas.

You tell us

What do you think Canada is #1 in the world for? Find us on Facebook and share your thoughts with us.

Spirit Island, Canadian Rockies - by Ann Badjura of Ann Badjura Photography, courtesy of Flickr.com

Spirit Island, Canadian Rockies – by Ann Badjura of Ann Badjura Photography, courtesy of Flickr.com

Australia is #1 in the world because …

You might imagine that Australia’s beaches, exciting career opportunities or national sports teams are all world-beating – but what does the data show?

It shows that Australia does top the charts – here’s a look at what Australia does better than anywhere else in the world.

The world’s most liveable cities

Each year the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) undertakes and releases its Global Liveability Ranking and Report which provides scores for 140 cities worldwide. Its latest report (from 2014 data) places Melbourne at the top of the list – for the fifth year in a row.

The report looks at 30 factors across five areas: stability, infrastructure, education, healthcare and environment. Melbourne received perfect scores in healthcare, education and infrastructure, culture and environment and sport. Overall, it scored a near-perfect 97.5 out of 100.

It’s not hard to see why. Melbournians enjoy unburdened, effective infrastructure. Melbourne may be a big city but it has the Yarra River flowing through it and masses of green open parks and gardens, contributing to its residents’ sense of wellbeing. It boasts impressive arts and culture and winding laneways of bars, restaurants, cafes and shops. It also has a low murder rate, helping its residents feel safe.

Australia also has three other cities in the top 10 – no other country has that many top-ranking cities in the list. Adelaide is joint fifth, with Sydney seventh and Perth eighth.

Check out the rest of the world’s best cities here.

Twelve Apostles by Worakit Sirijinda, sourced from FreeDigitalImages.com. Northern Territory.

The top in civic engagement

The OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) Better Life Index goes beyond GDP data and economic statistics. Instead it delves into the well-being of countries’ residents, looking at 11 essential areas of living conditions and quality of life.

The OECD believes that trusting your government is essential to your sense of well-being and that a high voter turnout is a measure of citizen engagement. In Australia, voter turnout is 93% – whereas the OECD average is 68%.

This means Australia tops the chart of OECD countries in terms of civic engagement. It suggests that the Australian political system performs well as it reflects the will of a huge proportion of the population.

See how Australia performs in other OECD measures.

Make the move

If you think Australia is right for you, you can put your plan into action this October – the Working International Expo is coming to London and Manchester. Meet Australian employers, find out more about your visa options and sort out your move – all under one roof. See you there!

You tell us

What do you think Australia is #1 in the world for? Find us on Facebook and let us know your thoughts.

Dancing Lights by Gav Owen, sourced from Flickr.com. Melbourne.

The Best 3 Ways to Move to Canada

You’ve imagined tellng your current boss that you’re leaving for Canada. You’ve researched where you want to live. You’ve started the job search. But you’re still not sure how to actually make the move from the computer screen to Canada.

Sound familiar?

We’ve compiled our top three ways to make your move to Canada a reality this year.

canada lake

Work in an in-demand industry, and land a job before you go

An obvious start, but make sure you’ve researched what jobs are actually in demand in Canada. You’ll get extra points on your visa application if you have a qualifying job offer from a Canadian employer.

We’ve compiled a post about Canada’s latest skill shortages – check it out to see if your occupation is needed in Canada.

If your occupation is on there, start your job search. You can try Working In Canada’s job board which is frequently updated.

If your occupation isn’t on the list, there are other visa options available to you – see ‘Get clued up on Canadian visas’ below.

Meet Canadian employers face-to-face

Or, even better than a job board, you could visit the Working International Expo. This October we’re coming to London and Dublin (our boutique, Canada-only show) with Canadian employers recruiting for a range of job skills and industries.  Attending an expo is a great way to meet these Canadian employers face to face. You’ll get the opportunity to sell your skills and experience and you may even interview while you’re there.

consider a move outside the big cities

Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver are really popular with would-be Canadians, so think about making the move to some of the smaller provinces. The provinces experience critical skill shortages (meaning they’re more likely to look internationally for the skills they need) but still offer the incredible lifestyle and landscape of Canada’s major cities (arguably more so, as they’re less populated).

Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) operates currently in these provinces:

  • Alberta
  • Manitoba
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Yukon
  • British Columbia
  • New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia
  • Saskatchewan
  • Ontario

PNP applications are given preference over other skilled visa applications (like the Federal Skilled Worker stream) by Citizenship & Immigration Canada, as they look to find the skills the provinces really need.

Get clued up on Canadian visas

There are multiple visa options into Canada for skilled workers, entrepreneurs, business owners, students, family members, and more.

The best way to understand the different routes into Canada and the options available to you is to get specialist visa advice.  At the Working International Expo, we’ve got Canadian visa experts (like Brazolot Migration Group) on hand to guide you through your different options and the visa process.

You can also explore Citizenship & Immigration Canada’s website to determine your eligibility.

Show your commitment

Canadian employers want to see an understanding about what relocating to Canada will really mean to you – and they want to see your commitment to making your new life work.

Have you ever visited Canada?  Do you have family in Canada?  Will you be bringing all your family with you to Canada? Or will all of your family be back home? How will you adjust to your new life?  Are you in it for the long haul or will you turn around and head back home after only a few months?

Consider the above questions and be sure that a move to Canada is right for you.

…It is? Great, going to the Working International Expo is a good way to show your commitment and enthusiasm. You can research all your visa options, meet potential employers and sort your move – from arranging professional movers to opening a bank account.

Make the move to Canada this October

You can arrange your move to Canada this October without leaving the UK or Ireland. The Working International Expo is coming to London, Dublin (our boutique, one-day expo featuring Canadian employers only), and Manchester, starting in a fortnight!

See you there!

Aurora Borealis, Canada

The Best 3 Ways to Move to Australia

It’s already September – not too much time left in 2015 to make your goal of moving to Australia a reality.  Luckily we’re on hand with our top three tips to get you off your couch and onto that plane to Australia this year.  Yep, this year.  Really.

Sort a job before you land

For your best chance at an Australian visa, it’ll help to work in an industry that desperately needs your skills and experience. We’ve recently done a round-up of the occupations in demand in Australia – check out the list to see if your occupation is on it.

If it is, start searching for your new job in Australia. Working In Australia’s job board is updated regularly with opportunities across Australia in a variety of industries.

However, if your occupation isn’t on the list, there are still other visa options open to you – see ‘Understand your Australian visa options’ below.

Meet Australian employers in the UK

Even better than looking online for your job in Australia is meeting Australian employers on your home turf in the UK.  You can do that this October as the Working International Expo is returning to London and Manchester.

The expos have a fantastic range of Australian employers, across a range of industries. This October we have upmarket retail giant David Jones exhibiting with us, looking for top UK Buyers. Also exhibiting are Retail FM, looking for Maintenance and Refrigeration Engineers. In Healthcare we have four organisations attending the expo, looking to lure doctors, nurses, and other Healthcare professionals to a job in the lucky country.

You’ll also have a chance to learn what it’s really like to live and work in Australia – face-to-face.

Think Beyond Sydney and Melbourne

Sydney and Melbourne are consistently found in the world’s most liveable cities surveys – but the rest of Australia has a lot to offer too.  Competing against the big city lights, certain areas in Australia are desperately in need of skilled workers and they’re attractive options too.

Secure employment, progressive career opportunities, enviable lifestyles without the big city bustle, and incredible scenery can all be found outside Australia’s major centres.  Even better – there’s a visa programme dedicated to regional centres, called the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme.

It’s not a points-based visa scheme which may mean you find it easier to meet the criteria. Applying for this scheme means you cannot move to:

  • The Gold Coast
  • Brisbane
  • Newcastle
  • Sydney
  • Wollongong
  • Melbourne

aborigine art 3

Understand your Australian visa options

There’s a wide range of visa options available in Australia for business owners, family members, students, skilled workers and more.

The best way to understand the Australian visa process and the different options available to you is to get expert visa advice.  At the Working International Expo in London and Manchester, you can meet Australian visa specialists like Migration Planners face to face.  You’ll be able to understand the visa requirements and which visa may be right for you.

The Australian Government’s Department of Immigration and Border Protection has a helpful visa finder tool, too.

Prove your commitment

Australian employers want to know that you’re really committed to taking the big step of moving, living and working in Australia.

Have you visited Australia?  Are you planning to?  Do you have family or friends there?  Are you going to bring all your family with you, or are they staying behind?  How will you cope thousands of kms from home?  Will you arrive only to leave a few months later?

Think carefully about all of the above questions.  If you’re still keen, then great.

One way to show your commitment is to attend the Working International Expo.  All in one place you’ll find answers to all of your questions, and Aussies to grill about what it’s really like to live and work in Australia.

Make the move to Australia this October

From London and Manchester, you can get all you need to make the move to Australia – find a job, sort your visa and make all your moving arrangements, from finding movers to opening your bank account.

***

Join us in London or Manchester – we’ve got special discounted Early Bird tickets still available for the Manchester event, but only until this Friday (25 September 2015), so get in quick.

See you there!

aborigine art 2

The Jobs in Demand In Canada

On 1 January 2015, Canada launched its most exciting immigration overhaul yet – Express Entry.  A smarter and more streamlined process, it aims to get the skills and experience Canada needs into the country quicker than before.

If you’re one of 347 eligible occupations and meet certain criteria, you could successfully move, live and work in Canada and start living the Canadian dream.

Quebec

Are you eligible for Express Entry?

To be able to apply for Canada’s Federal Skilled Worker program, you need to use Express Entry. To be eligible for Express Entry you must meet all of the below criteria:

  • Your occupation is on the eligible occupation list (see below) and have one year of continuous full-time paid work experience or the equivalent in part-time continuous employment within the past 10 years;
  • Your work experience must be classified by Canada’s National Occupational Classification system as Skill Type 0 (Managerial Occupations), Skill Level A (Professional Occupation) or Skill Level B (Technical Occupations and Skilled Trades);
  • You must score sufficient points under the skilled worker point grid that has six selection factors including language skills, education, age, and work experience. The current pass mark is 67 out of 100;
  • You must undergo language testing to prove your English or French language skills;
  • You must have enough funds to allow you to settle in Canada;
  • You must successfully pass a background security check and medical exam.

How Express Entry Works

If you’re interested in applying for Express Entry, here’s how the process works:

  1. Fill out an online profile that includes details of your language test scores and work experience. There is no charge to do this.
  2. Your application then goes into a pool with other applicants where you’ll be ranked against other applicants. You can remain in the pool for up to one year.  If after a year you haven’t been invited to apply, your application will expire.
  3. If you’re a top candidate, you will receive an invitation to apply.
  4. If you’re invited to apply, you can apply online for permanent residency.

The current processing time is six months or less.

Eligible Occupations

Before you apply for Express Entry, you need to make sure that your occupation is on the eligible occupation list. There are 347 occupations on this list – for the full list, check out our separate blog entry.

Where to go for Help

To help you through the Express Entry process, there are places you can go:

You can also start your job search today, for jobs located in Canada – good luck!

Great Bear Rainforest

The Skills in High Demand in Australia

Whether it’s calling one of the world’s most liveable cities home (hello Melbourne), exploring some of the most famous skylines (hi Sydney) or losing yourself (not literally we hope) in the stunning job opportunities in the outback, Australia offers a lot to potential new Aussies.

If you’ve got the skills and experience Australia needs then you could be moving, living, working and playing there soon. See if your skills are in demand in Australia.

Sydney Harbour

About the Skilled Occupation List (SOL)

The SOL is updated regularly to reflect the changing needs of Australia. You need to nominate an occupation on the SOL if you’re applying for:

  • Independent points-based skilled migration and you’re not nominated by a state or territory government agency – this is SkillSelect
  • A Family Sponsored Points Tested visa
  • A Temporary Graduate visa (subclass 485) – Graduate Work stream

About SkillSelect

SkillSelect is how Australia chooses which applicants to invite to apply for a visa. To apply you submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) online. You’ll then go into a pool of other applicants where you’ll be ranked on things like your work experience, skills, age and language abilities.

Depending on your ranking in the pool of applicants, you may then be invited to apply for a visa.

Find out more about SkillSelect.

The skills on the SOL

There are currently 191 occupations on the SOL. If you need a skills assessment as part of your visa application, you need to contact the assessing authority directly to get this. They will provide all the necessary forms and information you need and there will be a cost for this.

View the SOL, along with details of the relevant assessing authorities.

The Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List (CSOL)

If you’re applying for a visa under these programs:

  • Points-based skilled migration and you’re nominated by a state or territory government agency under a State Migration Plan
  • The Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS), and you’ve been nominated by an Australian employer to fill a position in an occupation that appears in the CSOL
  • The Temporary Work (Skilled) visa – subclass 457
  • The Training and Research visa (subclass 402)

You need to find your occupation on the CSOL, not the SOL.

View the current CSOL.

Get help with your Australian visa

To help you through the Australian visa process, you can:

You can also start searching for your new job today – good luck!

The Opportunities Overseas Expo UK and Ireland roadshow July 2013

This July, it certainly seemed like the Opportunities Overseas Expo brought the best of the weather to the UK – we landed in a heat wave that continued throughout the week and half of this July’s roadshow.

London: 6-7 July

We started in London, our flagship location where hundreds of people turned up (even though the weather was glorious and it was the Wimbledon final).

A nicely busy expo, visitors enjoyed meeting overseas employers and recruiters such as the Department of Health – Western Australia, Hays Recruitment (Australia and New Zealand), Hire A Hubby (New Zealand), The Physicians Recruitment Agency of Saskatchawan (Saskdocs – Canada) and Top Energy (New Zealand).

Opps Overseas Expo London July 2013_2Opps Overseas Expo London July 2013_1

Dublin: 10 July

Next stop was Dublin with a dedicated New Zealand jobs and seminars tour. Three employers flew in from New Zealand (Naylor Love Construction, Ryman Healthcare and Top Energy), alongside migration experts VisaFirst and Bayleys Real Estate Taranaki.

All the employers were really impressed with the expo attendees and met some great candidates.

Irish media really helped to plug the event with coverage in the Irish Examiner and the Daily Edge.

Top Energy Dublin July 2013

Newcastle: 11 July

We visited Newcastle for the very first time this July with a boutique event focused on migration advice and employment in Australia and New Zealand plus Canadian visa information.

The Department of Health – Western Australia and Hays Recruitment had roles available in Australia and New Zealand whilst Brazolot Migration Group was kept busy with Canadian visa enquiries.

Birmingham: 13-14 July

Our final stop was Birmingham, another busy weekend expo in the midst of the glorious British summer. The first time we’d been to Birmingham in a few years, the show brought a large number of Kiwi employers to central England, including Hire A Hubby, Naylor Love Construction, ACCENT Health Recruitment and Hays Recruitment.

They were joined by visa specialists Migration Planners, the Government of Western Australia running skilled migration seminars, The Physicians Recruitment Agency of Saskatchawan (Saskdocs – Canada) and Brazolot Migration Group (Canada).

What’s it like to attend an Opportunities Overseas Expo?

Here’s a selection of visitor feedback from the July shows:

“Really informative seminar, all questions/facts answered. Friendly staff and great venue. Very enjoyable.”

“Was brief but good. I found the Canada stand very helpful and quick. Very satisfied with attending.”

“It was great having a chance for one-on-one conversation.”

“Keep up the good work. The knowledge at the booths was good.”

“Generally interesting, had most of our questions answered and have lots of useful contacts.”

Next events

The Opportunities Overseas Expo will be back in October, details of upcoming events can be viewed at Working In Events.

Latest skill shortages in New Zealand

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHays quarterly report has highlighted the occupations that are most in demand in New Zealand. The most recent report, covering April – June 2013, shows that tradesmen continue to be needed as the Christchurch rebuild picks up pace and other professions joining the demand include accountancy and IT professionals.

New Zealand is on the hunt for skilled, experienced professionals with at least a few years’ work experience under their belts (rather than recent graduates or students) in the following areas:

Accountancy and finance – commerce and industry

  • Senior Payroll Consultants/Payroll Managers
  • Payroll Officers
  • Credit Control – candidates with the proven ability to maintain a strong relationship with a client or a customer whilst successfully collecting monies owed are in constant demand.
  • Accounts Payable – there’s a high demand for skilled and experienced Accounts Payable Processors, in particular in temporary and contract positions, as organisations look to maintain their invoice processing.
  • Assistant Accountants
  • Financial Analysts
  • Company Accountants – candidates who have a large scope of skills and abilities and who can take on varied roles are in demand as more companies restructure or absorb roles.
  • Financial Accountants – technical candidates, who can work through year end and month end, especially at this time of year, are in high demand.
  • Manufacturing Accountants – there is a high demand for skills in the manufacturing sector. Because it is such a specialist industry, the background in this sector is essential for most candidates. Therefore, there is a shortage of candidates in this area.
  • Auditors (Professional Practice) – these candidates are always going overseas or joining the commercial realm, which is creating a shortage in this space.
  • Internal Audit – this is notoriously a high-demand area as these candidates require a very “different” blend of skills.

Accountancy and finance – professional practice

  • Business Advisory Services Intermediates – in demand at all intermediate, senior and manager levels.
  • Manager and Senior – as corporate businesses start ramping up due to the Christchurch rebuild they are asking for more advisory services, for example, cash flow forecasting, tax advice, financial modelling, and it’s the Senior and Managers that can provide this advice.
  • Intermediates – with the Seniors and Managers time being absorbed in doing more ‘advisory’ work there is demand for Intermediate Accountants to do more compliance work.
  • BAS – demand is particularly high for candidates from big firms as they have big client experience.
  • Audit
  • Tax – many candidates leave tax before reaching Manager or Assistant Manager level, leaving this area candidate short at the upper levels.

Architecture

  • Architectural Technicians (2+ years) (ArchiCAD)
  • Project Architects (10+ years)
  • Architectural Technicians (2+ years) Revit

Construction

  • Quantity Surveyors
  • Estimators
  • Civil Site Engineers
  • Intermediate Quantity Surveyors
  • Supervisors and Engineers – particularly for those supervisors and engineers with tunnelling experience demand is high, as is being experienced globally.
  • UFB Supervisors – the UFB rollout across the country has seen high demand supervisors capable of managing multiple crews across multiple locations.

Energy

  • Glove and Barrier Line Mechanics
  • Cable Jointers – due to this trade recently becoming a stand-alone skilled profession in New Zealand the industry has a shortfall of experienced 33kv and above Cable Jointers on the distribution and transmission network.
  • Protection Technicians
  • Lines
  • Substation Engineers – Substation Engineers with local network experience and an understanding of industry standards and regulations are in demand.

Engineering

  • Structural Engineering – these candidates continue to be in demand from mature graduate to senior level. The high level of building assessments and strengthening projects taking place nationally, Christchurch rebuild and ongoing local refurbishment and new build project work across the country has created an even bigger shortage for Structural Engineers. Engineering Consultancies are requesting BEng qualified, preferable within New Zealand based on NZ design codes and local Seismic design awareness is preferred with CPEng qualified being very desirable to sign off on projects.
  • Civil Engineering Design (Transport, Water & Infrastructure) – Civil Engineers with five-plus years experience in design and project management are always in demand.
  • Geotechnical Engineers – Geotechnical Engineers with NZ bachelor degrees and anything from three years experience are always in demand in Wellington. A particular demand for senior Geotechnical engineers with 10+ years experience and NZ CPEng has been seen over the last year, as these are the rarest in the market and almost every consultancy in NZ would be interested in interviewing this type of candidate.
  • Land Surveyors

IT

  • Senior Network Engineer
  • Senior Systems Engineer – a high volume of project-based work lasting between 12-18 months is driving the demand for Senior System Engineer willing to take on contract employment.
  • Database Administrator – particularly within SQL, Database Administrators are in short supply. Solid ETL and report/cube building skills (SSIS, SSRS and SSAS) are in highest demand.
  • SharePoint Developer

Insurance

  • Brokers – these candidates are in demand within the F&G commercial space at the intermediate, senior and management levels across the country both in major cities and in regional areas.
  • Underwriters – there is some recruitment in the F&G space both in regional and main cities as candidates relocate and employers backfill vacancies where staff have moved on.
  • Loss Adjustors and Worker Compensation Officers – Australian companies are advertising in New Zealand for Loss Adjustors, Worker Compensation Officers and Underwriters as they endeavour to attract candidates with excellent training and work ethic, creating a shortage in New Zealand.

Legal

  • Senior Lawyers – candidates with major firm experience who offer a transferable client base are in demand as firms seek to develop their practices again after a holding pattern.
  • Senior Commercial, Property and General Practitioners – candidates with small to medium-sized firm experience are sought.
  • Commercial Solicitors – with solicitors preferring big firm experience or usually working for the larger regional firms there is a shortage of candidates in the commercial space.
  • Banking and Finance Solicitors – employers are in particular looking for candidates with major firm experience.

Property

  • Building Surveyors – with a large volume of continuing work in Christchurch and across the country, demand for skilled Building Surveyors with local experience is high.
  • Quantity Surveyors – similar to the market for Building Surveyors, Quantity Surveyors with local experience are in high demand with the large volumes of work taking place in Christchurch.
  • Intermediate Property Managers

Sales and marketing

  • Category Management, Market Research and Technical Sales
  • Business Development Managers and Sales Managers
  • Digital Marketers, PR and Communications – employers are favouring commercially-orientated candidates, as marketing budgets increase along with the need to demonstrate a measurable return on investment. Capable Digital Marketers are in demand on both the client and agency side.

Trades and labour

  • Excavator Operators/Drain Layers/Asphalt Layers/Drivers – Christchurch
  • Carpenter/Painter/Plasterer/Tiler/Scaffolder – Christchurch

Got the skills and experience New Zealand needs?

Head to Working In New Zealand to search for jobs and employers currently looking overseas to recruit.

Please note: this is intended as a general guide to skill shortages currently being felt throughout New Zealand and do not represent specific job vacancies specifically suitable for overseas candidates.

Christchurch, New Zealand: rising from the rubble … and better than ever

Nicky Wagner MP for Christchurch CentralBy Nicky Wagner, Member of Parliament for Christchurch Central

The Christchurch rebuild, following the devastating 2010/2011 earthquakes, is the biggest economic event in New Zealand’s history. And it is well underway.

Signs of redevelopment are everywhere and the Canterbury economy is booming – growing at more than twice the rate of the rest of the country in the past year. The current National-led Government has earmarked $5.5 billion for the region’s recovery and rebuild, while latest insurance claim estimates top $30 billion. This is, on a New Zealand scale, simply immense.

As the Member of Parliament for Christchurch Central, one of this city’s most damaged areas, I am excited about the plans for Christchurch and the blueprint for the new city centre. It has involved extensive professional and community consultation and collaboration, and many anticipate the new CBD will soon become hot property because of its redesigned compact layout.

You may well have seen images of the ReStart Container Mall, with its colourful, innovative combinations and inviting atmosphere, while the recently opened central city Enterprise Precinct and Innovation Hub (EPIC) has set out to become a world class campus for innovation-based Canterbury companies.

We look forward to the redevelopment of a number of new civic assets, including a 2,000-seat convention centre, new bus interchange, the Avon river green belt and a new 35,000-seat stadium. All over the city and Canterbury region, major infrastructure repair and reconstruction is well underway.

CEO of the Canterbury Employers’ Chambers of Commerce Peter Townsend is invigorated by the huge financial possibilities in the recovery, anticipating significant involvement as the rebuild continues to gather momentum. He emphasises this is going to go on for a long time.

And given the sheer scale of the rebuild, this means we need to recruit especially skilled people, particularly geotechnical experts and engineers, construction managers and supervisors. Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Hon Gerry Brownlee says in the past year, demand for construction project managers and supervisors increased 88% and 356% respectively, such is the volume and scale of projects beginning to come on stream.

Migrant input into the rebuild is genuinely welcome. Systems are in place to meet the demand and provide for a rise in population. We want to ensure there is a long-term vision for the rebuild – that this is no boom and bust scenario. We want to sustain a growing population, a booming economy, and a thriving new city.

Christchurch is already renowned for its quality schooling, healthy family lifestyle and of course, abundant and diverse recreational opportunities within a very short drive from the city. But with the skills, people power, capital, and palpable enthusiasm pouring into the rebuild, it can only get better.

Indeed, Lonely Planet recently ranked Christchurch in the Top Ten cities for 2013, describing it as “rising from the rubble with a breath-taking mix of spirit, determination and flair”. I couldn’t agree more. We are not just rebuilding a city, we are creating something quite special. Christchurch has a vision to become one of the best modern cities of the world and we invite you to be part of it.

Find your job in Christchurch

See roles in demand in Christchurch at Working In New Zealand.

How to answer the top 3 toughest interview questions

It’s a new year – the perfect time to gear up for your new job. Start by getting prepared for any questions your interviewer may throw at you. Today’s post comes courtesy of Richard McMunn, founder of How2become.com – be sure to take advantage of his expert tips.

In this post, I am going to give you some excellent tips on how to answer the three toughest interview questions you are likely to be asked. Of course, the toughest interview questions and what they are is open to debate; however, in my opinion, the following three questions are most difficult, simply because they can catch you out and your answers can result in a pass or a fail:

Question 1: Do you have any weaknesses?
Question 2: Why did you leave your previous employer, or why are you leaving your present job?
Question 3: Do you have any questions for the panel?

Let’s take a look at the interview questions.

Question 1: Do you have any weaknesses?

Now this has to be, in my opinion, the toughest question to answer, because anyone who says that they have no weaknesses is clearly not telling the truth! It is important to respond with an example weakness that will not do you any harm at the interview. When responding to this question before I have tended to use a weakness that has been cleverly disguised as a strength. Here’s a sample answer to this tough interview question:

“I do have one particular weakness that I am aware of. I have very high expectations of myself and of my work colleagues. If something is not done to a good standard then I usually have to make my feelings known, which sometimes has not been taken too well by the third party. However, since realising this weakness I have taken steps to improve. I still make my feelings known but in a more pragmatic and diplomatic fashion. I don’t want to ever lose my high standards, but what I want to do is continue to work on how I deliver my opinions and feelings about standards of work. Although this can be seen as a weakness there is also a strength here because I will always give 100% in any work-related role that I carry out. In addition to this I am always looking for ways to improve myself and believe strongly in continual personal and professional development.”

Question 2: Why did you leave your previous employer, or why are you leaving your present job?

Again, this is a tough question to answer because there is absolutely no way you can take a risk of slating your current or ex-employer! Many of us want to leave a job because we either dislike our boss or work colleagues, or we are not happy with our working conditions. If this is the case with you, do not under any circumstances be disrespectful of your boss or work colleagues. Here’s a great answer to this question:

“I actually really enjoy my current job but I feel it is time for me to move on. I feel that I have learnt as much as I can in the role and I would now like to take on a new and fresh challenge. Although I have been with my current employer for some time now I do believe the time has come for a change. I have thoroughly enjoyed working in my current post but I believe the job I am applying for here will take me to a new level. I have been impressed with your organisation when carrying out my research and believe I can bring a lot to the role.”

Question 3: Do you have any questions for the panel?

Of course, you do not need to ask any questions at the end of the interview; however, I feel it is important to ask one or maybe two questions as this will show enthusiasm and a desire for the role. Here are two great questions to ask at the end of your interview:

“Whilst waiting to find out if I am successful or not, can you recommend any further reading material or resources I can take away with me to learn more about the role and the organisation?”

This response is great because it shows that you are hungry and eager to learn more!

Here’s the second question:

“If I end up working for your organisation will there be an opportunity to progress in the company once I have learnt my role and gained the necessary qualifications and experience?”

Again, this is a great response because it demonstrates that you intend staying with the company for a very long time. Most employers will be spending a lot of time, effort and resources training you up in the role. If you can demonstrate that you intend staying with them for a long period of time then this can only work to your advantage.

When responding to any type of interview question always remember to answer it with enthusiasm and passion. If you do this, regardless of how hard the questions are, you will have a far greater chance of succeeding.

h2b-logo-250x250 (1)About Richard McMunn: Richard is the founder of How2become.com, the UK’s leading training and recruitment website for public sector careers. They focus on providing students with knowledge they need to prepare for and pass selection processes for specific careers such as the police and fire service. The website currently offers over 150 different titles. You can also find How2become on Twitter.

 

The real land of opportunity

This week we have a guest post, courtesy of Amy Knapp at InsideTrak. Here she tells her story about finding a job in your profession in your new country.

Blue sky with the land of opportunity written across it

When people talk of “The land of opportunity”, they’re usually referring to a country in which they’ve travelled, immigrated or done business. People rarely refer to their own country in this way – and there’s a reason for that.

You arrive in a new country blissfully unaware of the usual limitations of your profession. You don’t know the history so you don’t have the intimidation factor. And when you don’t have the intimidation factor, it becomes easy to apply for that top position at that top company, to ring the most influential person in the industry and ask her for some career advice, to switch professions on a dime and act like you’ve been doing it all your life.

It takes guts to relocate to a new country. The major bonus though, is that you leave a lot of your fears behind and leave yourself free to take chances you wouldn’t normally take in your own country. There’s no one around to judge you if you fail, no one around to say, “No kidding! You’re applying for a job there? My cousin’s been trying to get a job there for years!”

I arrived in Australia with an impressive resume that unfortunately had zero correlation with what I actually wanted to do, which was write. In Canada I’d managed a small business, been director of an NGO, and even put in three years at law school. When an opportunity came up to do some writing part-time, I jumped on it. I wrote an outrageous letter, laid the whole situation on the table and voila! I became a writer.

Some key things worked in my favour. Being a foreigner, I had some skills none of the other applicants had: I spoke French, had worked in three different countries and had a certain liveliness that must have been contagious.

Equally important were the things I didn’t know about the job, namely that there were over a hundred other applicants, most of whom had PR backgrounds and at least two internships under their belt. That should’ve been obvious. In Canada, I’d have known that I wasn’t qualified and probably not bothered at all. But since I was away from home and living life large in a foreign country, I took a shot.

The real reason they gave me the job was because they liked my letter. My employer at the time was an open-minded guy looking for a great writer. Turned out that none of the other stuff really mattered as much as I’d have thought it did (if I’d thought it through – which I didn’t).

That first writing job spiralled into another job, which spiralled into another and another and eventually became a cosy career as a freelance writer. Back in Canada, I demanded the same fees I did in Australia, even though Canadian salaries are significantly lower and technically I should have corrected for that. But you know what? Nobody complained. Not one single person.

The moral of the story is that it can in fact be an advantage not to understand the culture of your profession in a foreign country. It helps you escape your fears. It motivates you to take chances. There’s no fear of judgement or rejection. You don’t know these people. Why not take a shot?

Amy Knapp is a freelance blogger for InsideTrak, where you can find free job postings from Australian employers.

 

Lining up to help rebuild Christchurch

Our Opportunities Overseas Expo UK and Ireland November 2012 roadshow is on the road!

Last weekend we were in London where hundreds of people attended, looking for their new job – and for some, their chance to rebuild Christchurch, New Zealand.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Check out 3 News’ report of the busy expo.

We’ll be in Dublin (13 November) and Aberdeen (15 November), before finishing up in Manchester (17-18 November) – hope to see you there!

Fuelling your career abroad

Close up of flames on a black background

Fuel your energy, mining or engineering career by meeting overseas employers

Open any newspaper (or more likely these days, browse online via your favourite Apple device) and you’ll see the energy, mining and engineering industries are booming around the world. Fuelled by global demand for resources; government investment in infrastructure; or – in the very specific case of Christchurch, New Zealand – an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to rebuild a city, these industries are thriving.

Yet they’re also suffering from acute skill shortages, due in part to an ageing workforce beginning its downshift to retirement or a lack of students being enticed to train. Increasingly, those countries affected – such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand – are looking overseas to fill these skill gaps. Internationally recognised qualifications coupled with world-class experience means employers from these countries are keen to meet skilled professionals from overseas.

Explore your overseas opportunities

This November, you can meet a range of energy, mining and engineering industry employers at the Opportunities Overseas Expos in South Africa (Johannesburg) plus the UK and Ireland (London, Dublin, Aberdeen and Manchester).

You could meet Cameco. They’re a leading uranium producer from Canada who’ll be at the Jo’burg expo, looking to recruit construction managers (mining), senior metallurgists, senior project managers and senior engineers. EMS Recruitment and the Present Group from Australia will also be in Jo’burg, seeking senior mining engineers and head geotechnical engineers, amongst other roles.

Brierty Contractors from Australia will be in London and Manchester searching for civil project engineers and managers and quantity surveyors, plus more.

New Zealand opportunities include OMV New Zealand – a leading oil and gas producer based in the beautiful Taranaki region – who’ll be visiting London and Aberdeen. There’s also Truck Investments Group in Dublin and Manchester, looking for ready mixed concrete delivery drivers and heavy goods vehicle mechanics, amongst others.

Finally, if you’d like to be part of the Christchurch rebuild, come along and meet representatives from the Stronger Christchurch Infrastructure Rebuild Team. Leading multi-national companies Beca, Downer and Opus will be in London, Manchester and Dublin offering engineering and construction roles in Christchurch and throughout New Zealand.

Find out more

More job roles and further details of the industries represented at the Opportunities Overseas Expos, plus event dates and locations, can be found at Working In Events.

Canada, Australia and New Zealand in the news

Possum in a brick shed

Watch out for the power cable climbing possums in New Zealand

Here’s the latest news – with an industry and immigration focus where possible – from Canada, Australia and New Zealand:

Canada: skill shortages and immigration

A lot of Canadian news has been about their critical skill shortages, being felt by a range of industries. For example, in British Columbia they’re enjoying plenty of shipbuilding contracts, new liquefied natural gas plants and a booming mining sector. All great – apart from the fact there won’t be enough trained workers to fill the expected jobs surge.

According to Canadian Business:

“The government is projecting that among the one million job openings expected by 2020, 43 per cent will require skilled workers. It predicts there will be a gap of 22,000 to 32,000 people in northern B.C. [British Columbia] alone.”

These fears have been echoed on a national level with the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development, Diane Finley, taking the stage at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce’s Annual General Meeting to deliver a keynote speech about how to tackle Canada’s skills and labour crisis.

As part of a government initiative to discover the Top 10 barriers to Canadian Competitiveness came four key priorities identified by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. One of these priorities should be immigration – and specifically “ensuring immigration policy is aligned with local labour markets and employers’ needs”.

Read the full Top 10 barriers to Canadian Competitiveness report here.

Australia: positivity in jobs and migration

Coming off the back of the good news that Australian job vacancies have risen 4.2% in August 2012 was a report released by the International Monetary Fund showing that flexibility in the workforce will help Australia to ride out other global economic storms.

The report also identifies that temporary and permanent skilled migration will be vital so that workers can move across regions and industries:

“Their ability to do so will again be tested when investment in the resources sector comes off its peak and some labour currently employed there is to be absorbed by the rest of the economy.”

The full report can be viewed here.

New Zealand: pies and possums

It’s been a light-hearted news week in New Zealand, with a couple of ‘only in New Zealand’ moments.

This includes a pie-lover on a mission to restore a classic piece of the Kiwi culinary scene – the Georgie Pie. Apparently these tasty delicacies are unlikely to comply with today’s standards for fat and salt content. See the New Zealand Herald for more.

The culprit of a blackout across Gisborne in New Zealand’s north island has been found – a possum inadvertently climbing a power pylon. Makes a change from someone accidentally cutting through a cable at least…

Gannets, Kiwis and Fly In Fly Out (FIFO)

Our Marketing Manager Julie takes a quirky look at the Fly In Fly Out (FIFO) mining job opportunities and what they have in common with the local bird life:

Gannet flying against a blue sky next to a model of a Kiwi bird on a white background

What is the difference between a gannet, a kiwi and FIFO?

Two are high fliers, and the other is a flightless native bird.

Well, to be totally factual, the dear kiwi has no real choices on being grounded, coupled with being an endangered species treasured by New Zealanders. Now the gannet is a whole other story, having the freedom to fly around the world, eking out a living, meeting up with old friends and making new ones.

Then there’s FIFO (a.k.a. fly in fly out) which is not a feathered bird (but let’s not forget that flight is the operative word here) but best known by miners and mining companies who bid for miners then fly them out to billion dollar mining projects. So, miners and gannets both share a common goal – of making a living involving the move from one country to another.

Miners’ specialisation, skills and motivation to move to other countries means they have opportunities galore to live and learn new cultures, and can potentially earn a good living to support themselves and their families.

Did you know?

  • Mining companies will make bids to attract miners
  • There are great locations in Western Australia and Latin America
  • Accommodation and meals are provided in comfortable environments
  • You have the chance to go home on a regular basis

Now getting back to the moral of story, you may see there are a few parallels between our gannet and the FIFO miner, while the kiwi bird is clearly a rank outsider with no ability to take flight. Unlike you – so visit our website and check out those hot jobs and start your FIFO missions – what are you waiting for?

Work in New Zealand: five tips for successful job hunting

Hanna, our Visa Delivery Manager, relocated to New Zealand in 2008 and has had the privilege of working with numerous migrants who have made the journey down under – she loves making a positive difference to their experience. Here she shares her top tips for successful job hunting in New Zealand:

Pen on a help wanted ad in a newspaper

When sitting across the other side of the world with the ideology that you would like to work in New Zealand, how hard is it to get someone to take you seriously? How do you get yourself in front of the decision makers and how do you get over the initial issues of “no job, no visa, but no visa, no job”?

The New Zealand immigration process is such that many people require that elusive offer of skilled employment in order to make their dreams of relocating a reality. You’ve heard the success stories from others who have managed it all seemingly without stress or issue. You also have the skills and know that you would be an asset to a New Zealand employer. You’re able to jump on a plane and hit the ground running – so how do you get over the initial barriers?

1. Have a good CV.

A 12-page CV is daunting to anyone managing a recruitment process. Keep it to two pages and focus on your transferable skills, relevant qualifications and experience. Tailor your CV to the role you are applying for and be as specific as possible. Sell yourself.

2. Target your applications.

New Zealand is a small country with a natural propensity to rely on personal recommendations and word of mouth to get what you want. To fire your CV to all and sundry in the hope of getting someone, anyone, to respond favourably will not assist your chances of finding suitable work. It is likely to go to the same people more than once and this undermines how serious you are about your job search. Provide a covering letter which goes with your tailored CV, addressed to the person you know is managing the process. Be personally professional and stand out from the crowd.

3. Follow up.

You are on the other side of the world and in the same boat as many other hopeful migrants. When you fire off that CV and letter, keep track of the company, the contact name and the role you are applying for. Leave it a few days or until the closing date for applications has passed and then follow up with a phone call. Have they got your CV and covering letter? Do they have any questions you may be able to address? What is your availability for interview?

4. Be patient.

New Zealand is a laid back country and things tend to move at a slower pace than you may expect. But that’s why you want to live here, right? You may not get an immediate response to your enquiry, timeframes may be extended more than once and your messages may not be returned. Don’t make a pest of yourself but proactively stay on top of things and try to be patient.

5. Be prepared.

You may not get a lot of notice for an interview. Do your research into the role and the company, know what you are talking about geographically and give yourself the best chance of success. An interview is likely to be by phone or Skype and the timing may not be very appropriate, given the time difference. Be prepared to make allowances and understand if you aren’t being treated with special dispensation due to your location. If you want this to work then you have to be able to be flexible. Remind yourself of why you want to relocate and what New Zealand has on offer. What’s an 11pm phone call on a Sunday night, if it results in your ticket to a new life?

Remember, it’s never easy to find a new job in your home country so looking off-shore adds distance and a different culture to the challenges. Give yourself the best possible chance of being acknowledged. This is a marathon, not a sprint, and perseverance and a little smart thinking could be the winning approach.

In the news: Australia, New Zealand and Canada

Letters of the alphabet cut out and pinned to a notice boardHave a look at how Australia, New Zealand and Canada have been making the news this week:

Why highly educated immigrant parents choose Canada

For anyone thinking about a move overseas, you might consider the work opportunities or the lifestyle the country offers – this article from the Globe and Mail shows how some parents make the move based on the educational chances offered to their children. Not surprisingly, as this article explains:

“Immigrant students in this country [Canada] outperform their native-born peers.

They post stronger scores on standardized math and science tests and are more likely to go on to postsecondary education. The same does not hold true for immigrants to other countries, including the United States and the United Kingdom.”

Rebuilding Christchurch

More than a year on from the Christchurch earthquake, in which around 60% of the historic city centre was damaged, Christchurch is still working hard to rebuild – even as it’s been rocked by more than 11,200 aftershocks since the very first earthquake struck in September 2010. Watch Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee talk about the challenges of rebuilding Christchurch in the wake of criticism about the slow pace of recovery. See how Christchurch looked in February 2012 with this BBC News article.

Demand for skilled workers grows in Australia

The Clarius Skills Index, released on 3 September, shows that the demand for skilled workers has risen to its highest level in 12 months, with a shortage of 2,300 skilled positions. Additionally, “the index, based on 20 occupations representing 2.6 million skilled Australian workers, found nine occupations were in shortage – an increase from two in the previous quarter”. The most in demand workers were engineers. Read the full article on The Australian.

Flight attendants confess

Anyone considering the long flight across the world to Canada, New Zealand or Australia may be interested to hear flight attendants’ top tips to stop passengers annoying them.

Is the mine life for you?

Reckon you’ve got what it takes to work in the mines? Hays have released some interesting thoughts about who’s most suited to the mining life.

What it takes to succeed in a fly-in-fly-out (FIFO) role, according to Hays:

  • A willingness to work in remote locations
  • An ability to cope with the lack of services while onsite and the distance from family and friends
  • A genuine interest in the industry
  • The right attitude and adherence to compliance and the ability to deal with risk and rigour
  • The ability to commit to a project long-term

The pros and cons of a FIFO role:

Pros

  • Personal expenses can be reduced when living on site for extended periods
  • Long periods off can lead to more time at home and with families
  • Stronger sense of community at work
  • Opportunity to pursue other pursuits in time off

Cons

  • Long time away from home can impact on family and personal life negatively
  • Rigid work schedules can result in important family occasions or community events being missed
  • A nomadic lifestyle poses challenges to social life and to wellbeing
  • Some onsite facilities don’t provide much privacy with shared rooms and bathrooms

What is FIFO?

Fly in Fly Out – or FIFO as it is more commonly referred to – is a method of employing people for remote country locations which is very commonly used in Western Australia. As an alternative to relocating entire families to often remote locations, the employee is flown to the work site for a number of days, and then flown home again.

Why FIFO?

Employers prefer their workers to be FIFO as the cost of transporting employees to site is far less than it would be to build, maintain and develop long term communities. Employees may prefer the FIFO opportunity as their families are often reluctant to relocate to small towns in remote areas.

What should I expect?

Mine Workers in Bengalla

Mine Workers in Australia

Rosters dictate how long you are on site, and how long you are home. Most rosters offered are 4 weeks on site and 1 week at home – 4:1 however these rosters vary depending on the project and the site.

Usually a FIFO position involves working a shift of 10 hours each day for a number of continuous days. When on site, you will be supplied with all meals, accommodation, house-keeping – some camps also offer swimming pools, tennis courts, gyms, cable TV and unlimited internet as a way of attracting and retaining skilled staff.

Read on for more on what’s driving the industry here in Australia and how you can get your FIFO job:

(more…)

Could Australian heavy construction projects be the opportunity you are looking for?

Newman Hub Conveyors

Conveyors at the Newman Hub processing centre

Australia currently has tremendous job opportunities on some the biggest heavy construction projects wordlwide.

Within the construction industry the term “heavy” refers to items produced such as iron ore, coal, oil and gas etc. Owners of heavy construction projects are usually large, for-profit, industrial corporations. These corporations can be found in such industries as Infrastructure, power transmission and distribution, metallurgical and material handling, oil and gas, chemical, power generation, mineral processing etc.

Heavy construction projects require a team of qualified individuals to ensure successful project completion. Specifically, in the fields of mechanical and structural engineering, project management, construction management, quality surveying, Health Safety & Environmental and quality assurance management. In Australia majority of heavy construction projects are located in regional areas ‘outback Australia’ therefore, fly in and fly out (FIFO) rosters have been adopted as a method of employment.

Read on for details on some of the biggest current projects here in Australia:
(more…)

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: